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How to successfully use Hornady One Shot Case Lube
Mugbug  [Team Member]
Let me start by saying this is NOT an attempt to start a Blue vs Red vs Lanolin vs Imperial war though I am sure there are some that will attempt to take it that way.

There are as many ways to lube a case as there are people reloading and what works great for one person will not work so well for the next. I use One Shot for my large progressive batches and Imperial for my smaller single stage reloading so I am by no means saying the only way is the One Shot way. This is simply my attempt to help those that wish to try One Shot.

With that being said I have had zero stuck cases with One Hot since I learned how to use it correctly. I am also the first to admit the labeling on the can is misleading at best. There are several things that you must remember when using the product, some are on the label, some are not and some are on the label but just flat don't work.

The basics: Most of this is simple and a no brainer.

1. Shake the can for a full minute before starting to use the lube. I find inverting the can so the bottom is up helps mix the lube with the carrier agent if it has been on the shelf for a long time.

2. Make sure the can is at room temperature or warmer. The lube thickens as it get colder and can lead to problems with poor mixing.

3. Regardless of what the label says let the lube dry at least 10 minutes before sizing. The lube thickens as the carrier agent evaporates, sizing early can lead to a stuck case.

4. When spraying your brass you need to occasionally give the can a good shake to keep the lube mixed in the carrier agent.

5. The amount of lube needed is also misleading on the label, when starting off I suggest the following, if you think you have enough given them another good dose to be safe. Once you have used the product a bit you will get a feel for how much is enough. I feel it should be called Two Shot, you cant use too much but you sure can use to little

6. Clean all other lubes out of your sizing die, use a spray de-greaser for this. Once clean and dry give the whole die a light spray to avoid rust then give the bore of the die a heavy shot and let it dry at least 10 minutes before use. This is one time process when you change to One Shot though a occasional shot in the die is not a bad idea.

7. This should go without saying but make sure your brass is clean, dirty brass will ruin your die regardless of what lube you use.


My method of lubing cases is as follows, it is certainly not the only way but works well for me. Others use a cardboard box or a loading tray with success.

1. Take a one gallon ziplock bag, lay it flat on the bench and add brass until I have a solid SINGLE layer in the bag.

2. After shaking the can as described above I give the brass a good coating of lube being sure to get to the corners of the bag.

3. Pick the bag up and give it a good agitation to mix the brass and lube.

4. Lay the bag back on the bench and get the brass back in single layer. Repeat steps 2 and 3 twice more for a total of 3 sprays.

5. Dump the brass into a open topped container and allow to dry before using.




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DirtyDrew  [Member]
My question is why would you even try it if you have to go through all of this?
Mugbug  [Team Member]
Again I dont wish to get into a debate over which is best but that is a fair question.

As far as I know One Shot is the only spray lube commercially available that will not degrade powder or primer. If I am to use a progressive press in a truly progressive manner and not remove the lube before adding primer and powder I don't want a lube on and in my cases that stands a chance of damaging the powder and primer.

ETA: To me this is not a big complicated deal and takes no real time. I can lube 200+ 223 cases at a time in less then a minute. I don't find waiting for them to dry a large inconvenience since I normally like to take a break after a couple of hundred rounds anyway.
foxherb53  [Team Member]
D.C.L. Dillon Case Lubricant .


Shake , pump , roll around on tray , count to ten , size .
the-fly  [Team Member]
I use One Shot, and never have had problems. My method is similar to the OP's, but a tad more simple.

I have a heavy duty plastic bag thats about the size of a really large zip lock bag. I chuck about 200-300 pieces of brass in it, and spread them out so they are roughly 1 layer deep

I then spray down the brass for about 20 seconds. Pick up bag, shake it well. Spread out brass again, spray it about another 5-10 seconds. Shake again. Let it sit for about 4-5 minutes, then load.

Case lubing for me is something that takes so little time I don't give it any thought. And I reload quite a bit.

FriscoPete  [Member]
Jeez, I thought this was going to be another "HOW TO COOK A CARP" threads. You know - the one where the directions are:

Ingredients One Carp
1/2cup vinegar
1 tsp. sugar
1/2cup minced mushrooms
1/2cup minced onions 1 egg
1/2cup bread crumbs 1 stick of butter
1/2cup chopped onions 1 chopped carrot Juice of 1 lemon
salt and pepper

Directions Wash the flesh with vinegar and let it stand for fifteen minutes. Mix bread crumbs, sugar, onions mushrooms and carrots together with a cup of water or white wine and stuff the fish. Brush the fish all over with a stirred egg, cover it thickly with bread crumbs and a few lumps of butter. Then bake the carp on a mesquite board for an hour in a moderate oven, basting occasionally.

When the fish is done, place it on a heated platter and garnish with slices of lemon. Throw away carp - eat board and garnishes.

Only the last line would read "Toss One Shot case lube into trash - use Dillon product".

Mugbug  [Team Member]
*SIGH*

I don't care if you lube your cases with lard or dip them in chicken blood....... please take the thread in the way it was intended which was to be helpful.
1911smith  [Team Member]
I used to do a four angled attack from a reloading tray. Wait a few minutes, then size. That is until someone was nice enough to share how he used Imperial Wax using their left hand and pulling with their right. The Gentleman rubbed his fingers in the wax every 3rd round or so. My One Shot has not been used since. Rifle brass runs through my dies like pistol brass in carbide dies. Better actually. Give it a try.
AeroE  [Moderator]
Link the thread in the Gateway thread - it's your legacy to own now!

Here's the thing; the number of reports about stuck cases we get here won't decrease, because human nature won't change.

1911smith  [Team Member]
Ok,ok,alright already !

Here's the link. Imperial Wax by 7zero1
RFmissile  [Member]
Originally Posted By Mugbug:
*SIGH*

I don't care if you lube your cases with lard or dip them in chicken blood....... please take the thread in the way it was intended which was to be helpful.


MuGBuG,

Thanks for the insight and info on your technique.

I just recently started reloading again and I have been researching what would work with my new Hornady AP press. I have been using Imperial sizing wax for my .50 BMG reloads and it works very well.
I have reloaded .45 Auto on the AP but not .223 yet. I will give your technique a shot with the Hornady 1 Shot.

Does the One Shot spray get down inside the case neck sufficiently as well for the expander ball not to stick. I use a Q-tip with Imperial to swab the inside of the 50 BMG cases, just wondering about .223 or .308 with the One Shot?
Mugbug  [Team Member]
Using this method I do not lube each case mouth individually.

Between the fog of lube created in the bag and the mixing of the brass between sprays enough lube finds its way into the case mouths that I have had no issues. Keeping the brass in a single layer in the bag helps with this since it increases the chance of the spray entering the case mouth directly.

ETA: I have successfully used this method on 223, 308, 30-06, 7.62x54R, 303 British and 22-250 and I suspect any case of comparable size would be fine.

I have never loaded a .50 BMG so I can not speak for it's effectiveness there.
hdbiker1  [Member]
Mugbug, that is the method I use, but now that I've used the two cans of Oneshot that came with my LnL AP (approx 4-5000 cases), I've moved on to using the home made stuff.
Sabre19  [Member]
That's more or less what I do with One Shot as well.

My brass goes into an open-top plastic container. I simultaneously spray and shake/toss the brass around in the container for a few seconds, let sit for a few minutes, and thats it. No stuck cases yet.
dragon  [Member]
I use nothing but One Shot. I load 50 cases in loading block, in a left to right motion i start spraying front cases, than to
the middle than the backend. stop spraying, rotate block 180 degrees. spray cases one last time in same progression
as first time. remember when spraying to keep a 45 degree angle to block so lube gets into mouth of cases. I only wait
a minute or two before I start resizing. I've been doing it this way for the last 8 years or so, and NEVER had a stuck case
out of any calibers I reload for.....223, .308, .270, .303, 8mm, 50Beowulf.

The product isnt that hard to use people!
1911smith  [Team Member]
Yep, yep, and I used to use it exactly the way you describe dragon in a loading block. Never a stuck case until I started picking up 5.56 brass that had been run through an AK-74. (AK-102) I switched to 7zero1's method using Imperial, it's a big difference. Send me a postage paid box or envelope and I'll send you my bottle of One Shot.
ECS  [Member]
Originally Posted By AeroE:
Link the thread in the Gateway thread - it's your legacy to own now!

Here's the thing; the number of reports about stuck cases we get here won't decrease, because human nature won't change.



Couldn't have said it better myself...

RFmissile  [Member]
Originally Posted By Mugbug:
Using this method I do not lube each case mouth individually.

Between the fog of lube created in the bag and the mixing of the brass between sprays enough lube finds its way into the case mouths that I have had no issues. Keeping the brass in a single layer in the bag helps with this since it increases the chance of the spray entering the case mouth directly.

ETA: I have successfully used this method on 223, 308, 30-06, 7.62x54R, 303 British and 22-250 and I suspect any case of comparable size would be fine.

I have never loaded a .50 BMG so I can not speak for it's effectiveness there.


I wouldn't even think about trying to use it on 50 BMG.
The 50 is hard enough as it is. Some have even gone so far as to tell others to beware of Mil once fired (M2) brass.
I found that after I tumble the Mil brass, then anneal the case necks, resizing is no problem using the Imperial wax. Trying to resize without annealing first was almost impossible.
Loading 50 cal is a slow process anyway so I don't mind the finger lubing.

CherokeeT  [Member]
I'm with dragon. That is the method I use (loading blocks) and I haven't got a stuck case either.
KB7DX  [Team Member]
I have also been using One Shot for quite a while. I think the key is to start with a clean die and follow the directions. When I first started reloading, HOS must have been a different recipe. It used to dry into a white, waxy film. Now it stays greasy but still works. My method: lay cases on thier side in rows. Spray at 45 degree angle so some gets into the case mouth. Roll 180 degrees and re-spray. Let dry for 8-10 minutes (old formula dried quicker it seems) and size away. I have never had a stuck case with HOS using it for .223 and 8mm Mauser. I clean my die after every session and re-coat with HOS.
Mugbug  [Team Member]
Yes, they appear to have changed the formula several years ago. To be honest I like the new stuff a lot more, the older stuff seemed to loose some of its effectiveness if sizing did not take place within a couple of hours.

KB7DX  [Team Member]
True, now that you mention that I remember it losing it's lubricity after some time passed. I still never had trouble with HOS....some people..
Mdripley  [Member]
Thanks Mudbug, I also have been using HOS and have had zero problems with it using the loading block method. I think the key is to shake the can very well, spray the cases at @ 45degrees turning the blocks 180, repeat spraying and taking a little break to check that everything is ready for a trouble free reloading session. It is nice to see others not bashing but finding helpful solutions. I will be trying to make a home made case lube to spray on once my current supply of oneshot is gone.
just trying to find ways to reduce costs associated with reloading.
Ch0wd3r  [Member]
Originally Posted By dragon:
I use nothing but One Shot. I load 50 cases in loading block, in a left to right motion i start spraying front cases, than to
the middle than the backend. stop spraying, rotate block 180 degrees. spray cases one last time in same progression
as first time. remember when spraying to keep a 45 degree angle to block so lube gets into mouth of cases. I only wait
a minute or two before I start resizing. I've been doing it this way for the last 8 years or so, and NEVER had a stuck case
out of any calibers I reload for.....223, .308, .270, .303, 8mm, 50Beowulf.

The product isnt that hard to use people!


Thanks for saving me from having to type it.

Maryland_Shooter  [Team Member]
Originally Posted By DirtyDrew:
My question is why would you even try it if you have to go through all of this?


I agree - generic canola oil in a spray can from Wal-Mart works really well for me.

One shot got one shot with me, now they are done.
Sgt_Cottle  [Member]
Did you know that Unique is the same stuff as One Shot in a solid form .... you can use it just like Imperial and it won't contaminate the powder or primer.

One Shot would be great if you could reliably tell when it was shaken up properly (read clear bottle and pump). It's just as easy to wipe a little Unique in a coffee can ... shake ... and dump into case feeder. Goes in and out of the dies ... slick as snot!!!

No wondering if you got enough on it or not.

Sarg

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