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5/29/2017 5:35:05 AM
Posted: 1/8/2002 6:53:54 AM EDT
Okay, I have been to the 1911forum web site and read alot about replacing the springs to help reduce muzzle flip on the 1911. Exactly what springs are they talking about? I know the recoil spring is the main spring but are there others involved when it comes to redusing muzzle climb? Has anyone gone to a smaller recoil spring on their 1911, and if so how did it improve/change performance?

Thanks

Sgtar15(aka Sgt1911)
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 7:00:57 AM EDT
The main recoil spring is the one they're talking about. I went from a 16 lb spring to 18 lb and it did reduce the muzzle flip when using ball ammo, 230 gr.

Welcome to the 1911 club.


Link Posted: 1/8/2002 7:01:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2002 7:13:48 AM EDT by KurtsKustom]
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 7:01:49 AM EDT
I am not a expert.
I only use a reduced spring weight when I use low power loads, like target loads.
I also use a recoil buffer to help since it absorbs some rearward movement force of the slide, this has helped with muzzle flip.
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 5:41:11 PM EDT
Gee George, that heavy stainless SA had hardly any muzzle flip and functioned flawlessly. Why mess with it.

Remember, it's a real gun, not a 9mm
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 6:26:16 PM EDT
[incorekt bord coad]Yeah, I prefer a heavier spring. I installed a Wolff 18.5 lb recoil spring; it's the only modification I've made on my Colt 1991A1 so far. I haven't noticed much of a difference, but my 15-yr-old brother said he noticed a definite decrease in recoil. I just got it to help functioning in really dirty conditions, but it has that nice extra benefit of reducing felt recoil and muzzle flip.
Link Posted: 1/8/2002 7:29:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By McNamara:
[incorekt bord coad]Yeah, I prefer a heavier spring. I installed a Wolff 18.5 lb recoil spring; it's the only modification I've made on my Colt 1991A1 so far. I haven't noticed much of a difference, but my 15-yr-old brother said he noticed a definite decrease in recoil. I just got it to help functioning in really dirty conditions, but it has that nice extra benefit of reducing felt recoil and muzzle flip.



Same thoughts here as McNamara:
I upped the spring in the Springfield (no pun intended) to 18#. I was experienceing frequent miss-feeds (jams) after 200+ rounds so I polished the feed-ramp and replaced the spring.
Did not notice too much diff. in the recoil but, the gun functioned much better (aka no jams) after lots 'o rnds.
Link Posted: 1/9/2002 8:00:42 AM EDT
sgtar15,
Before you start changing out your recoil spring, you need to find the ammo that works best for you. Then you can change out the spring to a stiffer one if needed. If your shooting light loads, a stiffer spring is only going to make the gun jam, due to lack of force by the light ammo.

Also, if you change out your slide spring to a stronger one, then you should also change out the firing pin spring. This is a must on a pistol that does not have a firing pin lock, such as a colt 70. The slide will be coming back faster and the standard firing pin spring may not be strong enough to retain the pin back, this could cause a slam fire.

The one thing that you might do is to change out your rod to a full length rod, and add a shock buffer. The new rod will cycle the pistol smoother and the buffer will lessen the slide blow the frame. If you check around you can find a one piece rod for under $20 and pads go for 6 @5.99. Remember to change out the pads when they are chewed up.

If you reload, I have found a load that works in wide range of pistols using the stock spring.

185 semi wad cutter, 4.2g of clays powder, Standard pistol primmer.
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