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Posted: 9/17/2001 7:42:50 AM EDT
I just heard parts of a Tony Blair speech where he said that with over 300 British citizens killed last Tuesday, it is the worst act of terrorism for their nation ever.
Link Posted: 9/17/2001 7:54:16 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/17/2001 8:23:42 PM EDT
They should list as many people as they can identify as unaccounted or dead, and their country of citizenship. I think we would find that the terrorists killed many Muslims. Wonder what Allah thinks of [b]that[/b]?
Link Posted: 9/17/2001 9:24:05 PM EDT
How many did our Colonists kill at Concorde and Lexington? I am not complaining. I do not consider the Revolutionary War an act of terrorism, but a fight for Freedom. I just wondered if the Redcoats looked at it this way. Interesting?
Link Posted: 9/18/2001 6:17:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/18/2001 6:22:32 AM EDT by 95thFoot]
Originally Posted By hdhogman: How many did our Colonists kill at Concorde and Lexington? I am not complaining. I do not consider the Revolutionary War an act of terrorism, but a fight for Freedom. I just wondered if the Redcoats looked at it this way. Interesting?
View Quote
One wounded regular at Lexington, three dead at Concord/North Bridge. Two of the latter are still buried by the bridge. On the way back to Boston however.... Gen Gage's estimate of losses of regular soldiers in the entire expedition to Lexington and Concord was: 65 dead, 180 wounded, 27 missing. The Redcoats looked at it as a job to do. Not many wanted to kill anybody. Most British soldiers involved were green, and had never experienced war, unlike many on the Patriot side, who were combat vets from the French and Indian War. Gen. Gage's wife was American. As occupations go, Boston and New England had it pretty good. There were no gallows erected on Boston Common, no firing squads cutting down Patriots left and right. The initial aim of the British was to restore the rule of law (as they saw it) to British territory, as peacefully as they could, even though both sides knew that it would come to some sort of shooting war. The question was, how big a war was it going to be. A good book to read, very even-handed, is David Hackett Fischer's "Paul Revere's Ride", about the events leading up to and during the fight at Concord and Lexington. I recommend it highly.
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