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6/25/2017 7:35:25 PM
6/21/2017 8:25:40 PM
Posted: 8/30/2001 6:47:56 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 6:51:53 PM EDT
I'm not a scholar, but I did not stay at a Holiday Inn last night. It is not a word, but it is used plenty.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 6:52:30 PM EDT
Why not just bitch about inflammable.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 6:55:53 PM EDT
Well,,, actually it is a word but it is listed at nonstandard. Sorry Larryg.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 6:57:09 PM EDT
Only if your da prez.![:D]
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 6:57:15 PM EDT
I'm from Alabama, if you want it to be a word, it is a word.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 6:59:46 PM EDT
Originally Posted By retrodog: Well,,, actually it is a word but it is listed at nonstandard. Sorry Larryg.
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Where do it say dat??
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:02:06 PM EDT
Webster's New Universal Unabridged Dictionary. And don't start rambling about it being a leftest rag or something. It's the only big dictionary I have.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:03:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:05:01 PM EDT
Well, it may be listed as a word, but classified as a corruption or colloquialism. People of good breeding & education don't use it, and those who do should be spanked. To me, it's worse than using "ain't" - I think most folks using "ain't" actually know better; those using "irregardless" are clueless. The word "regardless" serves just fine. Another common misusage that irritates me is the conditional phrase "If I was..." instead of the correct "If I were..." Subjunctive! Just recently, I busted my fancy liberal-arts Ph.D cousin on this one. -Bill Wiese The Grammar Police San Mateo, CA
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:06:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By retrodog: Webster's New Universal Unabridged Dictionary. And don't start rambling about it being a leftest rag or something. It's the only big dictionary I have.
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Damn leftist rag and furthermore...Oh, I forgot, you told me not to ramble about that. Sorry.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:07:29 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:08:56 PM EDT
Is it just one of those words they added just because people use it(albeit incorrectly?) "DOH!" has also been added to the Oxford English Dictionary because it has entered popular vernacular.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:09:31 PM EDT
Regardless if it is used regularly it is still not a word; if it were then it would be a double negative therefore making the statement the opposite of what is intended. As a side note there is an instance when two positive words combined make a negative statement.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:09:59 PM EDT
I'm sure a guy like you will come up with something brouhaha. Just think about it a little more.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:10:42 PM EDT
Irregardless is common enough in speech in the U.S. that it has found its way into judicial opinions. The U.S. Supreme Court’s Chief Justice William Rehnquist "upbraided a lawyer who used irregardless, saying: "I feel bound to inform you there is no word irregardless in the English language. The word is regardless. Linguistic Fastidiousness is no less important in oral than written argument."
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[url]http://www.hfac.uh.edu/English/classes/GU4322/items/irregardless.html[/url] It's a 'word', but people who use it are idiots.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:10:59 PM EDT
SDavid- Nail. Head. - Robbie
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:11:51 PM EDT
I can't believe this is really a thread on a AR-15 forum. Well,,, irregardless of all the comments I guess it's okay.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:18:08 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Robbie: SDavid- Nail. Head. - Robbie
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I don't get what you mean by that, I was thinking of something that a teenager would say when they don't believe what you are saying to them. (It also helps if you're surrounded by 1300 of them for six hours a day, 187 days a year.)
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:21:42 PM EDT
He was telling SDavid that he hit the nail right on the head. Either that or he wants to play with the head of SDavid's nail. Not sure.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:28:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By schnacke:
Irregardless is common enough in speech in the U.S. that it has found its way into judicial opinions. The U.S. Supreme Court’s Chief Justice William Rehnquist "upbraided a lawyer who used irregardless, saying: "I feel bound to inform you there is no word irregardless in the English language. The word is regardless. Linguistic Fastidiousness is no less important in oral than written argument."
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[url]http://www.hfac.uh.edu/English/classes/GU4322/items/irregardless.html[/url] It's a 'word', but people who use it are idiots.
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Amen. Good for Mr Rehnquist- a verbal bitch-slap in front of the whole SCOTUS- I wish I could have seen that....
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:28:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:47:49 PM EDT
retrodog- I get it now, he was writing about my statement not the side note... I be guting it now.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 7:54:59 PM EDT
Perhaps in time it will be deirregulated.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 8:04:41 PM EDT
according to [url]www.dictionary.com[/url] ir·re·gard·less (r-gärdls) adv. Nonstandard Regardless. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- [Probably blend of irrespective, and regardless.] Usage Note: Irregardless is a word that many mistakenly believe to be correct usage in formal style, when in fact it is used chiefly in nonstandard speech or casual writing. Coined in the United States in the early 20th century, it has met with a blizzard of condemnation for being an improper yoking of irrespective and regardless and for the logical absurdity of combining the negative ir- prefix and -less suffix in a single term. Although one might reasonably argue that it is no different from words with redundant affixes like debone and unravel, it has been considered a blunder for decades and will probably continue to be so.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 9:25:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By retrodog: Why not just bitch about inflammable.
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What he said. However, there is a reason [i]inflammable[/i] is a valid word - its root. From Merriam-Webster:
Etymology: French, from Medieval Latin [i]inflammabilis[/i], from Latin [i]inflammare[/i]
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[i]Irregardless[/i] doesn't have the same kind of paternity.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 10:00:45 PM EDT
I'am an english major. Irregardless iz opsolutlie knot a wird inn thy english languaje!! [:0]
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 10:04:23 PM EDT
How about aint. [(:|)]
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 10:11:24 PM EDT
Any combination of letters(symbols)is a word if you can pronounce it and give it meaning.
Link Posted: 8/30/2001 10:15:53 PM EDT
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