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Posted: 6/9/2012 2:42:13 PM EDT




I sometimes find myself at work whistling this and no one knows what it is
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 2:43:54 PM EDT
they don't recognize the tune because they're all assholes.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 2:44:58 PM EDT
David Lean is the man
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 2:45:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LightningII:
they don't recognize the tune because they're all assholes.

Also they didn't have family who lived through WWII. I knew about this song from a early age except I remember the lyrics that went along with it.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 2:46:49 PM EDT
Wow it's been a long time since I have seen that movie.


GM
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 2:48:03 PM EDT
picked up the bluray when it came out last year. great movie....
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 2:48:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By saigamanTX:

Originally Posted By LightningII:
they don't recognize the tune because they're all assholes.

Also they didn't have family who lived through WWII. I knew about this song from a early age except I remember the lyrics that went along with it.


Funny you mention this as I was just whistling that a few days ago.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 2:49:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By mcantu:
picked up the bluray when it came out last year. great movie....


One of my favorites...
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 2:50:02 PM EDT
First post and all that
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 2:51:00 PM EDT
"Kill him. Kill him"
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 2:59:05 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 2:59:31 PM EDT
I still don't understand why Obi Wan didn't just force choke that Japanese colonel.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:01:55 PM EDT
We used to get in trouble for whistling the theme while marching to class when I was in Technical School at Keesler AFB.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:06:08 PM EDT
Bridge on the River Kwai and Planet of the Apes are 2 of my favorite movies.

I can't think of one without thinking of the other, for obvious reasons.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:06:50 PM EDT
While I was in Vietnam my dad (a WWII vet) got me a 7 day leave to join him in Thailand- he was there on business.

It was a week I will always remember. We took the train to Kanchanaburi and visited the scene of the bridge. The Allied cemetery there was very inspiring, as both of us were military. The had displays of a truck converted to run the rails and much to see.

Before I left Vietnam I bought a Canon camera from a guy returning from R&R. I took several rolls of film, sent them home to be developed, not one picture turned out. The camera was defective. Oh well. Memories for sure. Go there if you ever get the opportunity.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:07:03 PM EDT
Kenneth Alford's Colonel Boogey's March

I like his "Eagle Squadron" too


There was an incident in the 70s or 80s when the Japanese Prime Minister visited Canada. The Canadian Military band on the lawn was playing Colenel Boogey.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:07:16 PM EDT
Awesome movie.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:08:02 PM EDT
Colonel Boogy March
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:18:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By saigamanTX:
...I knew about this song from a early age except I remember the lyrics that went along with it.


Comet. It makes your face turn green.
Comet. It tastes like gasoline.
Comet,
It makes you vomit.
So buy some Comet and vomit, today!
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:20:02 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:20:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bigsapper:
Originally Posted By saigamanTX:
...I knew about this song from a early age except I remember the lyrics that went along with it.


Comet. It makes your face turn green.
Comet. It tastes like gasoline.
Comet,
It makes you vomit.
So buy some Comet and vomit, today!

Hitler has only got one ball.
And that one is not much good at all.
Himmler is very similar.
And Goebbels has no balls at all.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:30:07 PM EDT
Excellent album (4 discs) with the themes from a boatload of war movies:

Album name: The Longest Day

Record Label: Silva Screen Records Limited
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:35:41 PM EDT
"BLOW UP THE BRIDGE???????"



"You...!"

"You...!"



"My God.... what have I done?"
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:36:13 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:36:43 PM EDT
There are now plans to reopen the railway now that Myanmar isn't such a pariah. I was reading about that just this past week.

Excellent movie, btw.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:51:09 PM EDT
The wife and I walked across that bridge back in 1992, really beautiful area.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 3:55:17 PM EDT
The bridge, allied cemeteries and Hellfire Pass are humbling places.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 4:01:09 PM EDT
I quite often say the single word "Madness" at work.
I don't think anyone gets it.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 4:02:07 PM EDT
Hitler has only one right ball/Georing has two but they are small/Himler has something sim’lar/but Goebbels has no balls at all”
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 4:07:32 PM EDT
Never seen this movie. I need to remedy that.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 4:12:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Kenneth Alford's Colonel Boogey's March

I like his "Eagle Squadron" too


There was an incident in the 70s or 80s when the Japanese Prime Minister visited Canada. The Canadian Military band on the lawn was playing Colenel Boogey.


Is this where I am supposed to admit that I think that Alford wrote far better marches than Sousa?

Great movie ranking up there with another of my Guinness favorites, "Tunes of Glory."

Link Posted: 6/9/2012 4:13:32 PM EDT
Winners, grow up with Malt-O-Meal.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 4:18:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bigsapper:
Originally Posted By saigamanTX:
...I knew about this song from a early age except I remember the lyrics that went along with it.


Comet. It makes your face turn green.
Comet. It tastes like gasoline.
Comet,
It makes you vomit.
So buy some Comet and vomit, today!


Scrotum, it is a piece of skin
Scrotum, it holds my testes in
Scrotum
So I can tote 'em
Tucked between my legs so I don't hurt 'em.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 4:20:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 4:24:00 PM EDT
That is a great movie, but I must admit, the first time I heard that tune was watching the original Parent Trap with Hayley Mills as a kid.

Link Posted: 6/9/2012 4:36:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By fireputrouter:
Never seen this movie. I need to remedy that.


It's an exceptional movie.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 4:51:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/9/2012 5:00:46 PM EDT by CarbineDad]
Originally Posted By Bklyn_Irish:
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Kenneth Alford's Colonel Boogey's March

I like his "Eagle Squadron" too


There was an incident in the 70s or 80s when the Japanese Prime Minister visited Canada. The Canadian Military band on the lawn was playing Colenel Boogey.


Is this where I am supposed to admit that I think that Alford wrote far better marches than Sousa?

Great movie ranking up there with another of my Guinness favorites, "Tunes of Glory."



Actually, that 25 years between them, and maybe 40 years between their polific peiods (1890s for Sousa, 1930s (28-42) for Alford –– Although I looked up Bogey's as 1914), makes a lot of differrence. The late Alford marchs were written in the big band era, and the arrangements are tighter and more complex, like all the music then. Hoiwever, Alford couldn't have done his without the Soasa blazing the way.

ETA: misc spelling –– I would start a Sousa vs Alford thread, but we would get what, three posts?
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 4:54:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Kenneth Alford's Colonel Boogey's March

I like his "Eagle Squadron" too


There was an incident in the 70s or 80s when the Japanese Prime Minister visited Canada. The Canadian Military band on the lawn was playing Colenel Boogey.


fuckin' A.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 5:06:59 PM EDT
The only thing I can think of when I watch it now is POW's who were there saying how retarded the movie was. They said there was no fucking whistling as they were beaten and starved to death. And the Japs knew how to build the bridge, the POWs were expendable slave labor.
One story that sticks with me is an American POW saying how they were burning the bodies of cholera victims, and he threw his dead best friend on the fire, and the heat made the body sit up and turn/twist to look at him.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 5:08:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By LightningII:
they don't recognize the tune because they're all assholes.


Ignorant in the extreme IMO. (those who don't recognize this tune)
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 5:11:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Originally Posted By Bklyn_Irish:
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Kenneth Alford's Colonel Boogey's March

I like his "Eagle Squadron" too


There was an incident in the 70s or 80s when the Japanese Prime Minister visited Canada. The Canadian Military band on the lawn was playing Colenel Boogey.


Is this where I am supposed to admit that I think that Alford wrote far better marches than Sousa?

Great movie ranking up there with another of my Guinness favorites, "Tunes of Glory."



Actually, that 25 years between them, and maybe 40 years between their polific peiods (1890s for Sousa, 1930s (28-42) for Alford –– Although I looked up Bogey's as 1914), makes a lot of differrence. The late Alford marchs were written in the big band era, and the arrangements are tighter and more complex, like all the music then. Hoiwever, Alford couldn't have done his without the Soasa blazing the way.

ETA: misc spelling –– I would start a Sousa vs Alford thread, but we would get what, three posts?


Maybe four?

I tend to chuckle when I hear UK military bands play Sousa marches, as you rarely hear US bands playing those by Alford.

Link Posted: 6/9/2012 5:21:07 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Bklyn_Irish:
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Originally Posted By Bklyn_Irish:
Originally Posted By CarbineDad:
Kenneth Alford's Colonel Boogey's March

I like his "Eagle Squadron" too


There was an incident in the 70s or 80s when the Japanese Prime Minister visited Canada. The Canadian Military band on the lawn was playing Colenel Boogey.


Is this where I am supposed to admit that I think that Alford wrote far better marches than Sousa?

Great movie ranking up there with another of my Guinness favorites, "Tunes of Glory."



Actually, that 25 years between them, and maybe 40 years between their polific peiods (1890s for Sousa, 1930s (28-42) for Alford –– Although I looked up Bogey's as 1914), makes a lot of differrence. The late Alford marchs were written in the big band era, and the arrangements are tighter and more complex, like all the music then. Hoiwever, Alford couldn't have done his without the Soasa blazing the way.

ETA: misc spelling –– I would start a Sousa vs Alford thread, but we would get what, three posts?


Maybe four?

I tend to chuckle when I hear UK military bands play Sousa marches, as you rarely hear US bands playing those by Alford.



High School bands tend to (at least on the West Coast) –– good saxaphone parts.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 5:22:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By xylo:
The only thing I can think of when I watch it now is POW's who were there saying how retarded the movie was. They said there was no fucking whistling as they were beaten and starved to death. And the Japs knew how to build the bridge, the POWs were expendable slave labor.
One story that sticks with me is an American POW saying how they were burning the bodies of cholera victims, and he threw his dead best friend on the fire, and the heat made the body sit up and turn/twist to look at him.

Yes, I vaguely remember something like this too––––that the idea that they would outdo themselves to build a railroad for captors that were starving and abusing them rankled some of the vets. . . The idea that they would take pride in that insulted them. . From what I've read they tried to sabotage whenever and whatever they could that they were building, if they thought they could get away with it. . .

Read "A Doctor's War" recently––––memoir of a very young Australian medical officer that was "surrendered" by the British garrison at Singapore. . .He eventually ended up in Thailand building that railway. . . .Lots of miserableness. . . .and no whistling. . good book. . worth reading. . .
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 5:31:10 PM EDT
Originally Posted By FudgieGhost1:

Originally Posted By xylo:
The only thing I can think of when I watch it now is POW's who were there saying how retarded the movie was. They said there was no fucking whistling as they were beaten and starved to death. And the Japs knew how to build the bridge, the POWs were expendable slave labor.
One story that sticks with me is an American POW saying how they were burning the bodies of cholera victims, and he threw his dead best friend on the fire, and the heat made the body sit up and turn/twist to look at him.

Yes, I vaguely remember something like this too––––that the idea that they would outdo themselves to build a railroad for captors that were starving and abusing them rankled some of the vets. . . The idea that they would take pride in that insulted them. . From what I've read they tried to sabotage whenever and whatever they could that they were building, if they thought they could get away with it. . .

Read "A Doctor's War" recently––––memoir of a very young Australian medical officer that was "surrendered" by the British garrison at Singapore. . .He eventually ended up in Thailand building that railway. . . .Lots of miserableness. . . .and no whistling. . good book. . worth reading. . .


The movie was never meant to be historical. It presents a "what if" type situation and allows a study of the human condition. It's use of skilled labor as a tool to maintain ones dignity and as a folksy connection to one's superior sense of culture is hardly original, even in prison stories. You can see similar psychological themes in Solzhenitsyn's "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich" which came out a few years later. Funny, as people accuse him also of downplaying the misery of the Gulags.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 5:40:18 PM EDT
The Colonel Bogie March it is called. I believe.


That's the whistling, right? No sound at the present.

Link Posted: 6/9/2012 5:42:49 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 49north:
Colonel Boogy March


Bogey.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 5:47:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
Originally Posted By FudgieGhost1:

Originally Posted By xylo:
The only thing I can think of when I watch it now is POW's who were there saying how retarded the movie was. They said there was no fucking whistling as they were beaten and starved to death. And the Japs knew how to build the bridge, the POWs were expendable slave labor.
One story that sticks with me is an American POW saying how they were burning the bodies of cholera victims, and he threw his dead best friend on the fire, and the heat made the body sit up and turn/twist to look at him.

Yes, I vaguely remember something like this too––––that the idea that they would outdo themselves to build a railroad for captors that were starving and abusing them rankled some of the vets. . . The idea that they would take pride in that insulted them. . From what I've read they tried to sabotage whenever and whatever they could that they were building, if they thought they could get away with it. . .

Read "A Doctor's War" recently––––memoir of a very young Australian medical officer that was "surrendered" by the British garrison at Singapore. . .He eventually ended up in Thailand building that railway. . . .Lots of miserableness. . . .and no whistling. . good book. . worth reading. . .


The movie was never meant to be historical. It presents a "what if" type situation and allows a study of the human condition. It's use of skilled labor as a tool to maintain ones dignity and as a folksy connection to one's superior sense of culture is hardly original, even in prison stories. You can see similar psychological themes in Solzhenitsyn's "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich" which came out a few years later. Funny, as people accuse him also of downplaying the misery of the Gulags.
It may have never meant to be historical, but what it meant, and what most people took away from the movie seem to be two different things. Many people THINK that it was "the way it was", and have never read any accounts of men who were there. . .

Link Posted: 6/9/2012 5:52:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/9/2012 5:53:18 PM EDT by arowneragain]
Originally Posted By FudgieGhost1:

Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
Originally Posted By FudgieGhost1:

Originally Posted By xylo:
The only thing I can think of when I watch it now is POW's who were there saying how retarded the movie was. They said there was no fucking whistling as they were beaten and starved to death. And the Japs knew how to build the bridge, the POWs were expendable slave labor.
One story that sticks with me is an American POW saying how they were burning the bodies of cholera victims, and he threw his dead best friend on the fire, and the heat made the body sit up and turn/twist to look at him.

Yes, I vaguely remember something like this too––––that the idea that they would outdo themselves to build a railroad for captors that were starving and abusing them rankled some of the vets. . . The idea that they would take pride in that insulted them. . From what I've read they tried to sabotage whenever and whatever they could that they were building, if they thought they could get away with it. . .

Read "A Doctor's War" recently––––memoir of a very young Australian medical officer that was "surrendered" by the British garrison at Singapore. . .He eventually ended up in Thailand building that railway. . . .Lots of miserableness. . . .and no whistling. . good book. . worth reading. . .


The movie was never meant to be historical. It presents a "what if" type situation and allows a study of the human condition. It's use of skilled labor as a tool to maintain ones dignity and as a folksy connection to one's superior sense of culture is hardly original, even in prison stories. You can see similar psychological themes in Solzhenitsyn's "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich" which came out a few years later. Funny, as people accuse him also of downplaying the misery of the Gulags.
It may have never meant to be historical, but what it meant, and what most people took away from the movie seem to be two different things. Many people THINK that it was "the way it was", and have never read any accounts of men who were there. . .



Would it be fair to say that To End All Wars was a more accurate portrayal of 'the way it was'?




eta: I know the movie is based on a true story, but was the true story representative of 'average' prison camp life, and is the movie faithful to the original story?
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 5:53:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By FudgieGhost1:

Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
Originally Posted By FudgieGhost1:

Originally Posted By xylo:
The only thing I can think of when I watch it now is POW's who were there saying how retarded the movie was. They said there was no fucking whistling as they were beaten and starved to death. And the Japs knew how to build the bridge, the POWs were expendable slave labor.
One story that sticks with me is an American POW saying how they were burning the bodies of cholera victims, and he threw his dead best friend on the fire, and the heat made the body sit up and turn/twist to look at him.

Yes, I vaguely remember something like this too––––that the idea that they would outdo themselves to build a railroad for captors that were starving and abusing them rankled some of the vets. . . The idea that they would take pride in that insulted them. . From what I've read they tried to sabotage whenever and whatever they could that they were building, if they thought they could get away with it. . .

Read "A Doctor's War" recently––––memoir of a very young Australian medical officer that was "surrendered" by the British garrison at Singapore. . .He eventually ended up in Thailand building that railway. . . .Lots of miserableness. . . .and no whistling. . good book. . worth reading. . .


The movie was never meant to be historical. It presents a "what if" type situation and allows a study of the human condition. It's use of skilled labor as a tool to maintain ones dignity and as a folksy connection to one's superior sense of culture is hardly original, even in prison stories. You can see similar psychological themes in Solzhenitsyn's "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich" which came out a few years later. Funny, as people accuse him also of downplaying the misery of the Gulags.
It may have never meant to be historical, but what it meant, and what most people took away from the movie seem to be two different things. Many people THINK that it was "the way it was", and have never read any accounts of men who were there. . .



People who think Vietnam was like Apocalypse now, or Good Morning America equally need their head examined, that does't take away from the work of art the is "The Bridge on the River Kwai." FWIW, nobody can study "oriental languages" at Oxford and communicate fluently with some random remote village girl in Burma.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 6:00:57 PM EDT
Guy I work with sometimes whistles it. I'm the only other peron who knows what it is. I also have a very old record of Victory at Sea that has this on it.
Link Posted: 6/9/2012 6:01:03 PM EDT
what a great movie

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