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Posted: 1/22/2011 4:33:34 PM EDT
Grilling over propane for quick results. Hot grill as usual. Seasoned as usual. But the outside of each burger turned a kind of bright red color. What happened? All burgers were fully cooked on inside (overcooked actually )

Anybody ever seen this happen?
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:34:46 PM EDT
Happens when cooking long pig.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:34:56 PM EDT


pics?
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:34:57 PM EDT
No, I use charcoal
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:35:45 PM EDT
Propane poisoning.

Dibs on guns and wimminz.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:35:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dimmu:
No, I use charcoal


Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:36:15 PM EDT
I have seen this happen once while cooking burgers. I would point towards dyed meat to make it look fresh longer?
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:37:10 PM EDT
I would guess that you bought some shitty beef.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:37:12 PM EDT
Happens to me almost every time I grill burgers from Costco either over propane or charcoal. Don't know why. They taste good though.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:40:49 PM EDT
Wal-Mart "beef"
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:42:14 PM EDT
Dibs on guns.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:42:39 PM EDT
That's a good sign. Another communist cow off the pastures.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:42:47 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MACD:
Wal-Mart "beef"


This.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:43:50 PM EDT
It means the cow is still alive.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:44:01 PM EDT
Originally Posted By larkinmusic:
I would guess that you bought some shitty beef.


Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:50:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DV8:
Originally Posted By MACD:
Wal-Mart "beef"


This.
Thats where it was from.



Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:51:08 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bradinator:

Originally Posted By DV8:
Originally Posted By MACD:
Wal-Mart "beef"


This.
Thats where it was from.





Fail.

Freshest meat is at H-E-B.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:53:27 PM EDT
Seen it many times: maily with very fresh ground meat. Beef and venison. First time I noticed it was from a young stier we had butched at a local shop. Was some of the best hamburger ever. I say grill, eat, and enjoy!
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:54:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Venkman:
Originally Posted By bradinator:

Originally Posted By DV8:
Originally Posted By MACD:
Wal-Mart "beef"


This.
Thats where it was from.





Fail.

Freshest meat is at H-E-B.

Thats the only place i shop, however my dad picked this up.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:55:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bigdog25-06:
Seen it many times: maily with very fresh ground meat. Beef and venison. First time I noticed it was from a young stier we had butched at a local shop. Was some of the best hamburger ever. I say grill, eat, and enjoy!

We ate it, it was pretty good other than I overcooked them. Im still not great at grilling in the dark.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:55:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By larkinmusic:
I would guess that you bought some shitty beef.


Yup. Cooked out some coloring would be my guess.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 4:56:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By smokiexd45:
I have seen this happen once while cooking burgers. I would point towards dyed meat to make it look fresh longer?


Yup. Kill an animal and grind it up and the meat is much more gray than it is in the store. While the op was grilling the liquids rose up to the top of the burgers and brought the dye with them. Flip the burgers and let the heat burn off the dye and chow down on artificial processed goodness.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:10:46 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Seansworth:
Originally Posted By smokiexd45:
I have seen this happen once while cooking burgers. I would point towards dyed meat to make it look fresh longer?


Yup. Kill an animal and grind it up and the meat is much more gray than it is in the store. While the op was grilling the liquids rose up to the top of the burgers and brought the dye with them. Flip the burgers and let the heat burn off the dye and chow down on artificial processed goodness.


I work as a butcher in super market. I have not heard of or seen any dye. What makes the meat red in the packages AT OUR STORE is oxygen on the meat and then putting it under the tight plastic wrap.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:13:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Originally Posted By Seansworth:
Originally Posted By smokiexd45:
I have seen this happen once while cooking burgers. I would point towards dyed meat to make it look fresh longer?


Yup. Kill an animal and grind it up and the meat is much more gray than it is in the store. While the op was grilling the liquids rose up to the top of the burgers and brought the dye with them. Flip the burgers and let the heat burn off the dye and chow down on artificial processed goodness.


I work as a butcher in super market. I have not heard of or seen any dye. What makes the meat red in the packages AT OUR STORE is oxygen on the meat and then putting it under the tight plastic wrap.


i thought they used carbon monoxide to make it stay red.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:15:16 PM EDT
I've had that happen before with venison, nothing to be worried about. Chow down!
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:16:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Venkman:
Originally Posted By bradinator:

Originally Posted By DV8:
Originally Posted By MACD:
Wal-Mart "beef"


This.
Thats where it was from.





Fail.

Freshest meat is at H-E-B.

Eating food from Butt is not an option around here.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:17:19 PM EDT
A rational possibility:


Carbon monoxide makes blood turn VERY bright red. Grilles produce some carbon monoxide, which may have
caused residual blood in the meat to turn bright red.


Possible?


CJ
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:18:36 PM EDT
I think that means you overheated it. That's when you pour beer on it to bring it down to cooking temperature.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:19:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dimmu:
No, I use charcoal

Heat is heat. Propane had nothing to do with it. Unless you are cooking with actual wood. Charcoal and Propane are just heat sources.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:20:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/22/2011 6:21:51 PM EDT by TrijiCog]
Nothing to be alarmed about,it means your hamburger is about to magically turn into a steak.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:22:48 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Originally Posted By Seansworth:
Originally Posted By smokiexd45:
I have seen this happen once while cooking burgers. I would point towards dyed meat to make it look fresh longer?


Yup. Kill an animal and grind it up and the meat is much more gray than it is in the store. While the op was grilling the liquids rose up to the top of the burgers and brought the dye with them. Flip the burgers and let the heat burn off the dye and chow down on artificial processed goodness.


I work as a butcher in super market. I have not heard of or seen any dye. What makes the meat red in the packages AT OUR STORE is oxygen on the meat and then putting it under the tight plastic wrap.


Walmart pumps their meats with various solutions to add flavor, color and enhance shelf life. It also adds weight to the product so you pay more for it. When you cook it, the solution cooks out and you are left with a nasty tasting piece of leather.

If you don't believe it, here is a quote from Bruce Peterson, the head of Walmart meat, dairy and seafood.

BEEF (MAGAZINE): A great deal of your fresh beef products are “enhanced” with a water-based solution. What drives the decision to merchandise beef this way?

Peterson: I think the whole idea of solutions, or “pumped” product, is going to revolutionize the meat industry over time. The solution process will ultimately be one of providing a flavor profile. This is no different in meat than in other foods. “Cooking” at home is becoming a lost art — much by choice — therefore the consumer is expecting to buy a piece of meat that has a particular flavor profile, stick it in the oven for 15-20 minutes and yet have something they remember eating when they were growing up.

Food additives, whether in solutions or otherwise, are becoming part of our food experience. The fresh beef area is one of the last great food bastions that have been generally untampered.

Preservative issues are more a factor of the packaging, as opposed to the solution itself. Clearly there are color stabilization benefits with the herb-based solutions we use.


The retail product is sealed in a highly oxygenated mix of gases injected into the container. Before the package is placed in the sales case, the outer, non-permeable layer of film is removed, leaving a gas-permeable layer of film beneath, allowing the meat to “breathe” and “bloom,” and assume the colors associated with fresh meat.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:26:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
A rational possibility:


Carbon monoxide makes blood turn VERY bright red. Grilles produce some carbon monoxide, which may have
caused residual blood in the meat to turn bright red.


Possible?


CJ

That's an interesting theory, and makes a good deal of sense to me.

( I was going to suggest sodium nitrates or nitrites which I believe are added to preserve the meat's red color and to help cause cancer in the consumer.)

Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:26:54 PM EDT
I've always assumed it was carbon monoxide
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:27:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DV8:
Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Originally Posted By Seansworth:
Originally Posted By smokiexd45:
I have seen this happen once while cooking burgers. I would point towards dyed meat to make it look fresh longer?


Yup. Kill an animal and grind it up and the meat is much more gray than it is in the store. While the op was grilling the liquids rose up to the top of the burgers and brought the dye with them. Flip the burgers and let the heat burn off the dye and chow down on artificial processed goodness.


I work as a butcher in super market. I have not heard of or seen any dye. What makes the meat red in the packages AT OUR STORE is oxygen on the meat and then putting it under the tight plastic wrap.


Walmart pumps their meats with various solutions to add flavor, color and enhance shelf life. It also adds weight to the product so you pay more for it. When you cook it, the solution cooks out and you are left with a nasty tasting piece of leather.

If you don't believe it, here is a quote from Bruce Peterson, the head of Walmart meat, dairy and seafood.

BEEF (MAGAZINE): A great deal of your fresh beef products are “enhanced” with a water-based solution. What drives the decision to merchandise beef this way?

Peterson: I think the whole idea of solutions, or “pumped” product, is going to revolutionize the meat industry over time. The solution process will ultimately be one of providing a flavor profile. This is no different in meat than in other foods. “Cooking” at home is becoming a lost art — much by choice — therefore the consumer is expecting to buy a piece of meat that has a particular flavor profile, stick it in the oven for 15-20 minutes and yet have something they remember eating when they were growing up.

Food additives, whether in solutions or otherwise, are becoming part of our food experience. The fresh beef area is one of the last great food bastions that have been generally untampered.

Preservative issues are more a factor of the packaging, as opposed to the solution itself. Clearly there are color stabilization benefits with the herb-based solutions we use.


The retail product is sealed in a highly oxygenated mix of gases injected into the container. Before the package is placed in the sales case, the outer, non-permeable layer of film is removed, leaving a gas-permeable layer of film beneath, allowing the meat to “breathe” and “bloom,” and assume the colors associated with fresh meat.


NOTICE I SAID " OUR STORE"
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:29:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By twckxbzd:
Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Originally Posted By Seansworth:
Originally Posted By smokiexd45:
I have seen this happen once while cooking burgers. I would point towards dyed meat to make it look fresh longer?


Yup. Kill an animal and grind it up and the meat is much more gray than it is in the store. While the op was grilling the liquids rose up to the top of the burgers and brought the dye with them. Flip the burgers and let the heat burn off the dye and chow down on artificial processed goodness.


I work as a butcher in super market. I have not heard of or seen any dye. What makes the meat red in the packages AT OUR STORE is oxygen on the meat and then putting it under the tight plastic wrap.


i thought they used carbon monoxide to make it stay red.


Meat comes in, in vacummed sealed bags, open the bag and cut the meat, it sits in open air for a certain period of time, the longer it stays in contact with the air the redder it turns. The red really comes out once its under the wrap. If you dont get a good seal on the wrap it turns brown very quickly and then grey.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:29:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bradinator:

Originally Posted By bigdog25-06:
Seen it many times: maily with very fresh ground meat. Beef and venison. First time I noticed it was from a young stier we had butched at a local shop. Was some of the best hamburger ever. I say grill, eat, and enjoy!

We ate it, it was pretty good other than I overcooked them. Im still not great at grilling in the dark.

Get a headlamp.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:30:40 PM EDT


It means you have old meat.





Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:31:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Originally Posted By DV8:
Originally Posted By MTNmyMag:
Originally Posted By Seansworth:
Originally Posted By smokiexd45:
I have seen this happen once while cooking burgers. I would point towards dyed meat to make it look fresh longer?


Yup. Kill an animal and grind it up and the meat is much more gray than it is in the store. While the op was grilling the liquids rose up to the top of the burgers and brought the dye with them. Flip the burgers and let the heat burn off the dye and chow down on artificial processed goodness.


I work as a butcher in super market. I have not heard of or seen any dye. What makes the meat red in the packages AT OUR STORE is oxygen on the meat and then putting it under the tight plastic wrap.


Walmart pumps their meats with various solutions to add flavor, color and enhance shelf life. It also adds weight to the product so you pay more for it. When you cook it, the solution cooks out and you are left with a nasty tasting piece of leather.

If you don't believe it, here is a quote from Bruce Peterson, the head of Walmart meat, dairy and seafood.

BEEF (MAGAZINE): A great deal of your fresh beef products are “enhanced” with a water-based solution. What drives the decision to merchandise beef this way?

Peterson: I think the whole idea of solutions, or “pumped” product, is going to revolutionize the meat industry over time. The solution process will ultimately be one of providing a flavor profile. This is no different in meat than in other foods. “Cooking” at home is becoming a lost art — much by choice — therefore the consumer is expecting to buy a piece of meat that has a particular flavor profile, stick it in the oven for 15-20 minutes and yet have something they remember eating when they were growing up.

Food additives, whether in solutions or otherwise, are becoming part of our food experience. The fresh beef area is one of the last great food bastions that have been generally untampered.

Preservative issues are more a factor of the packaging, as opposed to the solution itself. Clearly there are color stabilization benefits with the herb-based solutions we use.


The retail product is sealed in a highly oxygenated mix of gases injected into the container. Before the package is placed in the sales case, the outer, non-permeable layer of film is removed, leaving a gas-permeable layer of film beneath, allowing the meat to “breathe” and “bloom,” and assume the colors associated with fresh meat.


NOTICE I SAID " OUR STORE"



My reading comprehension is fine. I posted this for the benefit of all.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:35:15 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bigdog25-06:
Seen it many times: maily with very fresh ground meat. Beef and venison. First time I noticed it was from a young stier we had butched at a local shop. Was some of the best hamburger ever. I say grill, eat, and enjoy!


"stier" "Sie sprechen Deutsch Ja"
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 6:37:12 PM EDT
It's the Viagra.

Sometimes, it makes the lights look blue too.

Link Posted: 1/22/2011 7:25:24 PM EDT
Here's my PSA as far as food industry goes.

The common practice of enhancing the coloration of meats and fish so as to make it more appealing to buyers is to treat the product with carbon monoxide.

What this does is promote a reddish color to the meat and or fish. It appears fresh, when in fact it could be beyond it's life.

This has been going on in the U.S. for about 6 years now. The FDA has yet to rule it illegal, and the trace amounts of carbon monoxide which the product retains, have not proved to be a health issue.

You can always tell if it's carbon monoxide because the reddish color disappears when the product is cooked. The reason I found out about this, is I purchased some Mahi Mahi which looked pink, knowing that swordfish can be the same color, I just accepted it as normal. When I cooked it, it went back to the normal color that Mahi is. It was on the label that I found it was treated with carbon monoxide.

Another little tid bit about treating foods with CM is that the process has been declared illegal in the European countries, but still permissible in the United States.

Now that they're able to fool our eyes into buying food past it's prime, you've got to rely more upon your nose to know what's edible and what isn't.




Link Posted: 1/22/2011 7:26:47 PM EDT
Originally Posted By smokiexd45:
I have seen this happen once while cooking burgers. I would point towards dyed meat to make it look fresh longer?


The meat isn't actually dyed. Just purged of oxygen and filled with another gas to preserve and promote a brighter red color.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 7:30:15 PM EDT
Originally Posted By WildBoar:

Originally Posted By Dimmu:
No, I use charcoal

Heat is heat. Propane had nothing to do with it. Unless you are cooking with actual wood. Charcoal and Propane are just heat sources.


Doesn't matter...I had some nice steaks turn red while grilling them on a hibachi
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 7:34:07 PM EDT
Only had that happened when I was grilling burgers I ground myself from chuck tender steak over lump charcoal and hickory.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 9:03:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By gwitness:
Originally Posted By WildBoar:
Originally Posted By Dimmu:
No, I use charcoal
Heat is heat. Propane had nothing to do with it. Unless you are cooking with actual wood. Charcoal and Propane are just heat sources.
Doesn't matter...I had some nice steaks turn red while grilling them on a hibachi

That really shouldn't happen with any good meat. I'm no high-volume chef, but the only time I've seen meat turn red after cooking was Wal-Mart ground beef, or frozen ground beef patties from Swann trucks, Wal-Mart, Sams, etc.

There might be some merit to CMJ's gas grill theory, as that's the only time I've seen it. Or it could be that gas grilling people buy the cheapest, shit meat possible

Wood and charcoal purists I know would never use frozen or questionable meat (other than trying to pass off a coyote half as a baby whitetail but that's a different story).
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 9:06:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MACD:
Wal-Mart "beef"

This or carbon monoxide generated by the choked-off fire. Yes, even propane will make CO. The same mechanism which makes it deadly is responsible for preservation of the red color of the myoglobin.

Fresh green peppers and onions can also stabilize the myoglobin.


Link Posted: 1/22/2011 9:12:02 PM EDT
The pH of the meat can also affect the amount of pink in cooked hamburger. Bulls give lower pH meat.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 9:26:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Sturmgewehr-58:
Only had that happened when I was grilling burgers I ground myself from chuck tender steak over lump charcoal and hickory.


Had it happen when grilling over mesquite too.
Link Posted: 1/22/2011 9:26:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Keith_J:

Originally Posted By MACD:
Wal-Mart "beef"

This or carbon monoxide generated by the choked-off fire. Yes, even propane will make CO. The same mechanism which makes it deadly is responsible for preservation of the red color of the myoglobin.

Fresh green peppers and onions can also stabilize the myoglobin.




Why does the meat I cut at work turn red when exposed to open air? It comes in cyrovacced bags. And its greyish to brownish in color. The same as if it was just cut from a beast. After 5 to 10 minutes exposure to open air it begins to redden up. When wrapped it turns BRIGHT RED especially when the plastic wrap is drawn tight and it contacts the meat.
Link Posted: 1/23/2011 1:27:35 AM EDT
chi-com beef
Link Posted: 1/23/2011 2:06:42 AM EDT
All of the above are excellent, excellent ideas and theories.

However, the truth be told - Your meat is loafing.

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