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ilbob
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Posted: 12/18/2011 11:19:12 PM
[Last Edit: 12/18/2011 11:19:36 PM by ilbob]
I never camped in Afghanstan, but I always found it was warmer if I could get off the ground. Pads, anything to get some insulation between me and the infinite cold heat sink.

I also found that a couple of handwarmers down by my feet helped too.

drew5337
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Posted: 12/19/2011 12:39:15 AM
Fill up a nalgene bottle with boiling water, screw the top down good, put it in a sock, throw that in the bottom of your bag. Use the water for coffee in the AM.

I've got a wiggys solution for 40, 35, 20, 0, -20, and -40. Good luck getting me to recommend a different brand. My -20 FTRSS has been tested to -10, where I was still not only able to sleep, but very warm and comfy as well.
"She should make friends with girls with fake boobs. She needs to squeeze different ones to see what she wants. I like silicone, myself."
"When you rub one out while thinking of me, the psychic energy you release adds to my power."<
LongBeach
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Posted: 12/19/2011 2:27:39 AM
[Last Edit: 12/19/2011 2:29:36 AM by LongBeach]
Im not in the military, but maybe try a kifaru slickbag with a wobbie. Mine has been great for camping, etc... here in CA.
ilbob
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Posted: 12/19/2011 10:10:16 AM
[Last Edit: 12/19/2011 10:23:09 AM by ilbob]
I can't say how well this works, or whether it would work for you or not, but I have run across posts elsewhere from ultralight backpackers who claim a space blanket bivy and a wool or fleece blanket works surprisingly well. Literally they take a couple of space blankets and tape them together to form a bivy of sorts, and put the blanket inside and crawl in.

Personally, I suspect one would get damp inside such a getup from body moisture, but maybe not. Unless you are sweating most of the moisture would come from respiration and that could be outside the bivy kept warm by other means.

One place I ran across the guy claimed he used this arrangement at 14F (granted for a short time). To me it does not seem even possible for it to work that well, but I have never tried it.http://www.bushcraftusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=934

They all seem to agree with having a pad of some sort under it though.

Read some of these reviews

I have always considered space blankets to be just a one time use tarp, but maybe I need to rethink that.

bigsapper
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Posted: 12/19/2011 10:18:02 AM

Originally Posted By ilbob:
Originally Posted By tc556guy:
Originally Posted By ilbob:
Originally Posted By Kirch:
Well just got back from a 3 day and 2 nights Afghanistan camping trip and froze my ass off at night.


Thats a long way to go on a camping trip. :)


The Army RUINED camping for me as a fun pasttime for many years.


A guy I knew who came back from the marines wanted nothing to do with being outdoors for many years after he finished his time. In HS he was really into winter sports. Skiing, snowmobiling etc. He spent a couple winters someplace pretty cold walking a guard post outside, and completely lost interest in outdoor activities in the cold. I have not run across him in a long time. I wonder if he ever got the winter sports urge back.

One of my favorite pastimes now, is to curl up by the window with a hot cup of joe when it's cold and rainy outside and think, "sucks to be out there".

WarHound55
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Posted: 12/19/2011 8:56:39 PM
Alpaca socks are tops on wool. I have worn Wool and Alpaca, of similiar weights, while tree stand hunting. One foot wool and one foot alpaca, then switched the next day. Same result being the alpaca was warmer.

Alpaca wool mix socks here
Regnar379
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Posted: 12/19/2011 9:54:39 PM
1. Sleeping pad, bring it.
2. Bivy bag, bring it.
3. Place pad in bivy.
4. Dry off or change clothing before sleeping. Your clothing will hold moisture even if you think you are dry. I know in sector you don't always have that luxury but some gold bond powder will soak up some in a pinch.
5. Poncho and wobbie. Never leave home with out them. Tie together and use as ultra light bag in Bivy.
6. Disregard green bag. If its warm enough for it you are better off going with #5.
7. As tempting as it may seem don't seal yourself up in your bag. Your exhaled air will condense and leave you wet.
8. Buy stuff sacks for Poncho and wobbie to cut down on space
9. Black bag is warm, but bulky. No real way around it except looking to the civilian market.
Snow318
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Posted: 12/20/2011 9:03:02 PM
Originally Posted By LongBeach:
Im not in the military, but maybe try a kifaru slickbag with a wobbie. Mine has been great for camping, etc... here in CA.




This is what I have been waiting to hear. All my packs are Kifaru. I've been looking at these for a while.

50 rounds a week, whether I need it or not.
TaylorWSO
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Posted: 12/21/2011 11:54:26 AM

Originally Posted By tc556guy:
My biggest complaint about the pads have been that they are too slick. I am a restless sleeper to begin with, and the pads they have now, you slide off at some point during the night. The old foam pads were "tackier", if that makes sense.

roll it up with a shelf liner in it. It will keep you from slipping off.

I would go with the smartwool sox, down bag and a therma rest.

You out in the Konar?

If you could get your hands on a crye overcoat, that would rock. I used one before and it kicks ass.
Anything is possible, everything is temporary
LongBeach
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Posted: 12/23/2011 2:05:59 AM
[Last Edit: 12/23/2011 2:06:41 AM by LongBeach]
"This is what I have been waiting to hear. All my packs are Kifaru. I've been looking at these for a while. "


They make some really nice equipment. Im actually thinking about picking up some more gear from them. Which pack did you got with?
Snow318
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Posted: 12/23/2011 3:40:08 PM
Went with the Navigator. It's a little bigger than I need, but I figured I would grow into it. Really nice bag.
50 rounds a week, whether I need it or not.
drew5337
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Posted: 12/23/2011 4:09:15 PM
My main ruck is a MMR. If the Navigator wasn't so close in size then it would be my next pack, as its one of the few Kifaru packs I haven't had at some point.

Their bags use virtually the same insulation as Wiggys, but are make without the lamination process, use lighter shell fabric and smaller zippers. Should be very warm for the size and weight, but very spendy. For what the full modular system costs you can have one of their paratipi shelters and a stove!
"She should make friends with girls with fake boobs. She needs to squeeze different ones to see what she wants. I like silicone, myself."
"When you rub one out while thinking of me, the psychic energy you release adds to my power."<
TANGOCHASER
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Posted: 12/24/2011 3:08:25 AM
Just adda poncho liner (woobie) to what ever sleeping bag your using. Light weight, doesn't take up much room and it reflects a lot of your body heat back onto you while you sleep. Fleece works well too but gets heavy and hard to dry if it gets wet.
كافر
daemon734
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Posted: 12/25/2011 1:29:59 PM
[Last Edit: 12/25/2011 1:31:11 PM by daemon734]
Originally Posted By Kirch:
Well just got back from a 3 day and 2 nights Afghanistan camping trip and froze my ass off at night. The three layer sleeping system is great if you have room for all three layers, I don't because of limited space for gear I need accomplish the mission. I used the Bivy cover and light sleeping bag and was pretty cold in 30 degree temps and at about 1750 meters above sea level. My old MOS always allowed for me to bring the whole sleep system either in my bag or a buddies and I felt like a rookie out there on this mission.

Not too worried about price point but the smaller the bag the better. Don't care how much it weights either just as long it will keep me warm.

Socks also, need good warm socks. Any ideas or recommendations would be great.
Thanks guys,
Kirch


I ended up having to do that in the Argandab on an air assault. Last minute we had to ditch our bang bags and consolidate them into our rucks. Ended up with just the light sleeping bag. Mission went from 3 days into over 30 and the weather changed midway through. We slept on the ground and it was miserable, I was so cold I couldnt sleep at night. I went through a case of thermites we had airdropped to us just burning trash next to me to stay warm. Towards the end when it got really cold we had the terp go buy us large blankets from the locals.


I think you are a little farther north from where I was, but i've been up there too and and it was ridiculous cold even during the day moving around.
My drill sergeant had done three tours as combat arms, had a scar down the length of his face, and was no-shit bi-polar. That's how they are supposed to be.
TomJefferson
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Posted: 12/25/2011 3:01:14 PM
Sounds like you need to just add a fleece bag liner to your options. They're very light and compress pretty well.

In general, I find right at or just below freezing harder duty on bags than either much colder or much higher. I think has to do with humidity and what happens right around that freezing point, typically a warmer day going colder. I know a days going there, that's my grab and use my zero degree bags. I think you will find the commercial offerings in the zero degree bag area, not quite as tough but way less weight and not bad on size. It just seems, you're right in the nitch where the MIL system is either too much or too little.

Tj
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PFC_Dustin
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Posted: 12/26/2011 9:43:16 AM
Originally Posted By -FiveFiveSIx-:


I have a wiggys as well, great bag.... You can also store them compressed for as long as you like, it will not ruin the insulation, unlike some of the other materials..


Where can you get them and how small can you compress it?
squeeky25
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Posted: 12/26/2011 6:19:24 PM
heat up water to a boil, pour in canteen, place canteen in bag, crawl in bag, fall asleep. thats what I do winter camping
drew5337
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Posted: 12/26/2011 11:20:17 PM
Originally Posted By PFC_Dustin:
Originally Posted By -FiveFiveSIx-:


I have a wiggys as well, great bag.... You can also store them compressed for as long as you like, it will not ruin the insulation, unlike some of the other materials..


Where can you get them and how small can you compress it?


www.wiggys.com

Ask about .mil discounts when you call.

The long/wide Ultralight FTRSS (rated to -20) compresses down a bit smaller than an MSS, but is a LOT warmer. The long/wide Superlight bag by itself (rated to 0deg) is slightly larger than a basketball.
"She should make friends with girls with fake boobs. She needs to squeeze different ones to see what she wants. I like silicone, myself."
"When you rub one out while thinking of me, the psychic energy you release adds to my power."<
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