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Posted: 10/31/2003 1:28:39 PM EDT
I've got both the Polish and Bulgarian 7.62 styles of synthetic mags for the AK. I like both kinds enough that I've selling off my steel mags. However, I read on the other side of this board how AR synthetic mags like Thermolds and Orlites have drawbacks that make them less desirable than the standard alloy types: melting after extended periods of firing, cracking in cold temperatures, and sensitivity to dirt and fouling that gets into the magazine itself. Is there anyone who's really tested the limits of the AK synthetics?
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 1:41:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ClarenceDammit:
I've got both the Polish and Bulgarian 7.62 styles of synthetic mags for the AK. I like both kinds enough that I've selling off my steel mags. However, I read on the other side of this board how AR synthetic mags like Thermolds and Orlites have drawbacks that make them less desirable than the standard alloy types: melting after extended periods of firing, cracking in cold temperatures, and sensitivity to dirt and fouling that gets into the magazine itself. Is there anyone who's really tested the limits of the AK synthetics?



Remember it's an AR not an AK.
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 1:47:10 PM EDT
Where to start? The 5.56x45 round is hotter to begin with, and a greater percentage of the AR mag is sleeved up in the receiver instead of in open air. The straighter casing of the 5.56 round generates more feeding challenges than the x39 round's tapered shape, so the tolerances care more about dirt. Canadian Thermelts were made without the Zytel that stregthens other AR poly mags.

I am sure others will add more. I enjoy several Thermolds for AR range mags since I do not worry about bending feed lips on them. But this matters less with the LULA.
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 1:56:15 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 2:05:28 PM EDT
Waffle mags appear to be much thicker than either Thermold or Orlite magazines, and they are steel reinforced.
Link Posted: 10/31/2003 2:08:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/31/2003 2:10:34 PM EDT by HeavyMetal]
Blanks melt Thermelts, not live rounds.

Blanks won't fully obtrude (seal) like real rounds and you get alot of soot blowing back from the chamber into the action. This is also why blanks foul so badly and are so dirty.

On an M-14, you must have a shield that clips on the cartridge guide to shield your eyes from blank residue.

The hot sooty gasses blow directly onto the feed lips and in full auto fire where the mag cannot cool between shots, can melt the mags feed lips.
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 6:54:56 PM EDT
Orlites also have embedded metal mesh at the top of the magazine (including the feed lips) to aid in heat dissipation. The other difference is that you won't have as much hot gas blowing into the receiver with a gas piston action as you would with a gas impingement system.
Link Posted: 11/1/2003 7:20:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By RichinCM:
Orlites also have embedded metal mesh at the top of the magazine (including the feed lips) to aid in heat dissipation. The other difference is that you won't have as much hot gas blowing into the receiver with a gas piston action as you would with a gas impingement system.



Has nothing to do with melting thermelts. It is gasses slipping past the cartridge case straight from the chamber. The impingment system on the AR blows it mainly above the bolt carrier, not toward the magazine.
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