Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 2/1/2006 7:37:51 PM EDT
blanco wants to create a united-nations-type-black-hole for MONEY

La. Governor Demands U.S. Pay Royalties
February 01, 2006
ASSOCIATED PRESS
www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nat-gen/2006/feb/01/020103120.html
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - Gov. Kathleen Blanco is demanding that the federal government give Louisiana more of the billions in royalties from oil and natural gas extracted off its coastlines, saying she'll block future leases without an increase in the state's share.

Blanco's warning, in a letter this week to the federal agency that manages offshore drilling, comes as the state is struggling to finance up to $40 billion in hurricane recovery and protection projects, and complaining that the federal government isn't helping enough.

The state wants half the royalties from oil and gas produced beyond its three-mile boundary - a sum that could amount to more than $2 billion a year.

The state currently gets 27 percent of royalties produced between three miles and six miles offshore. For oil and gas production in the Gulf of Mexico from six miles offshore to international waters, Louisiana received just $32 million of the $5.7 billion the federal government brought in.

Under federal law, for lease sales to go through, governors in adjacent states must agree that the sales are consistent with their states' coastal management plans.

The U.S. secretary of the interior, who oversees the Minerals Management Service, could override Blanco if she attempts to block the next lease sale. But Sidney Coffee, Blanco's executive assistant for coastal activities, said the federal government probably will want to avoid the yearslong legal battle that could result.

The Minerals Management Service has not completed its review of Blanco's letter and has not issued a response, an agency spokesman said Wednesday.

The governor met with oil and gas industry officials last week.

Jeff Copeskey, of Louisiana Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association, said Blanco's letter is meant to bring attention to the issue, and is not a slap at the industry.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 7:40:13 PM EDT
She's such a cunt
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 7:45:04 PM EDT
I'm all for that...As soon as the state of Louisiana starts paying for the subsidies that those same oil companies recieve out of the federal till. And also as soon as the Louisiana Coast Guard takes over rescue and patrols of the Gulf. They will also need to take over management of all coastal management activities paid for by the government. Then go ahead and send me a refund on the money it has cost MY state to house and feed her refugees. Then pay me back for the wear and tear all my vehicles have sustained driving on her shitty goddamn roads over the years.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 7:45:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:
She's such a cunt



pretty much sums it up
+.9 bar
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 7:49:24 PM EDT
after telling her to f-k off, she will stop us how
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 7:49:26 PM EDT
As soon as she pays back the billions in federal money that took care of the job she could not, mabye, maybe we could talk.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 8:37:46 PM EDT
LA gets a pretty raw deal when it comes to oil... Other State's have it better. Our coastline has been constants eroded by all kinds of federal and private (oil company) enterprises down there. Also, their definition of where exactlt our coastline is located, is tragically flawed. I'm not saying some people in LA screwed up, but the FED, whom some here seem to think of as the good guy, is truly the root of this particular problem.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 8:58:03 PM EDT
Kinda gives new meaning to the term "Welfare State." Even the politicians there think they fucking deserve it.

Blanco should just go back to being stuck on stupid. It really suited her just fine.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 9:06:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 22bad:
blanco wants to create a united-nations-type-black-hole for MONEY

La. Governor Demands U.S. Pay Royalties
February 01, 2006
ASSOCIATED PRESS
www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nat-gen/2006/feb/01/020103120.html
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - Gov. Kathleen Blanco is demanding that the federal government give Louisiana more of the billions in royalties from oil and natural gas extracted off its coastlines, saying she'll block future leases without an increase in the state's share.

Blanco's warning, in a letter this week to the federal agency that manages offshore drilling, comes as the state is struggling to finance up to $40 billion in hurricane recovery and protection projects, and complaining that the federal government isn't helping enough.

The state wants half the royalties from oil and gas produced beyond its three-mile boundary - a sum that could amount to more than $2 billion a year.

The state currently gets 27 percent of royalties produced between three miles and six miles offshore. For oil and gas production in the Gulf of Mexico from six miles offshore to international waters, Louisiana received just $32 million of the $5.7 billion the federal government brought in.

Under federal law, for lease sales to go through, governors in adjacent states must agree that the sales are consistent with their states' coastal management plans.

The U.S. secretary of the interior, who oversees the Minerals Management Service, could override Blanco if she attempts to block the next lease sale. But Sidney Coffee, Blanco's executive assistant for coastal activities, said the federal government probably will want to avoid the yearslong legal battle that could result.

The Minerals Management Service has not completed its review of Blanco's letter and has not issued a response, an agency spokesman said Wednesday.

The governor met with oil and gas industry officials last week.

Jeff Copeskey, of Louisiana Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association, said Blanco's letter is meant to bring attention to the issue, and is not a slap at the industry.




As a Louisiana resident I can say OPPOSE IT. New Orleans will sort itself out do not put more money in the hands of criminals. By criminals I mean our Louisiana elected officials.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 9:14:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 9:15:05 PM EDT by jpman7]

Originally Posted By Mattl:
New Orleans will sort itself out do not put more money in the hands of criminals. By criminals I mean our Louisiana elected officials.

+1
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 10:08:00 PM EDT
Well, I can't find my asbestos suit, but here goes anyway...

All we're asking for is our fair share of the royalties. Other states get much more than we do. We take the environmental hits from oil & gas companies, like carving canals through the coastal wetlands (which serve as a buffer for incoming hurricanes), but don't get much of the revenue compared to other states.

I haven't been around here much in the past several months, but I take it Louisiana isn't very popular right now on ar15.com, eh? :)

Yes, Blanco and Nagin are not exactly the poster-children for effective leadership, and we'll likely be doing something to fix that very soon. But in the meantime, our state is still totally fucked up from Katrina. People who were told they didn't need flood insurance are now sitting on big mortgages for worthless houses. I have flood insurance... lots of it. But I also understad how some people in areas that had never flooded before could think that they didn't need flood insurance. Regardless, I don't feel comfortable standing by as hundreds of thousands of families face financial ruin. And, on top of that, I would assume that 200,000+ foreclosures of this nature will affect the mortgage market nationwide. Simply ignoring these people is just plain wrong.

The failure of the federally-built levees are the reason why property damage was so high. We need to rebuild, and we also need to take steps to prevent this from happening in the future, and that takes money... lots of it.

--Mike
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 10:21:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 10:23:02 PM EDT by 22bad]

Originally Posted By mcaswell:
I haven't been around here much in the past several months, but I take it Louisiana isn't very popular right now on ar15.com, eh? :)



blanco and nagin were absolutely UNBELIEVABLE
(I won't go into the refugees impact on neighboring states)

The general idea is that the corruption is so prevalent in LA politics
that ANY money under their control will be stolen or "redirected"

You must share our opinion of LA politicians, I have been going to LA for decades
and they have always said that their politicians were some of the most corrupt anywhere
and, they always said that if a hurricane hit the levy "it will wash us all away"

They were proven correct, on both counts
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 4:08:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/2/2006 4:30:08 AM EDT by John_Wayne777]

Originally Posted By mcaswell:
Well, I can't find my asbestos suit, but here goes anyway...

All we're asking for is our fair share of the royalties. Other states get much more than we do. We take the environmental hits from oil & gas companies, like carving canals through the coastal wetlands (which serve as a buffer for incoming hurricanes), but don't get much of the revenue compared to other states.

I haven't been around here much in the past several months, but I take it Louisiana isn't very popular right now on ar15.com, eh? :)

Yes, Blanco and Nagin are not exactly the poster-children for effective leadership, and we'll likely be doing something to fix that very soon. But in the meantime, our state is still totally fucked up from Katrina. People who were told they didn't need flood insurance are now sitting on big mortgages for worthless houses. I have flood insurance... lots of it. But I also understad how some people in areas that had never flooded before could think that they didn't need flood insurance. Regardless, I don't feel comfortable standing by as hundreds of thousands of families face financial ruin. And, on top of that, I would assume that 200,000+ foreclosures of this nature will affect the mortgage market nationwide. Simply ignoring these people is just plain wrong.

The failure of the federally-built levees are the reason why property damage was so high. We need to rebuild, and we also need to take steps to prevent this from happening in the future, and that takes money... lots of it.

--Mike



Nobody is proposing ignoring people.

The federal government has appointed billions to help, and private organizations have given additional billions of aid.

That doesn't mean that we are going to allow the rest of the nation to get told what to do by this incompetent hack of a governor.

The levee problem wasn't the Feds fault.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 4:19:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 22bad:
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - Gov. Kathleen Blanco is demanding that the federal government give Louisiana more of the billions in royalties from oil and natural gas extracted off its coastlines, saying she'll block future leases without an increase in the state's share.



I guess that sorry cunt would rather the oilfield workers to collect unemployment. Sorry, I don't keep up with what other states receive for this but I do know that shit like I highlighted in red highly pisses me off. Especially considering I'm typing this from a drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico right now. Fuck Blanco, this is her last term.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 4:19:49 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 4:26:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mcaswell:
Well, I can't find my asbestos suit, but here goes anyway...

All we're asking for is our fair share of the royalties. Other states get much more than we do. We take the environmental hits from oil & gas companies, like carving canals through the coastal wetlands (which serve as a buffer for incoming hurricanes), but don't get much of the revenue compared to other states.

I haven't been around here much in the past several months, but I take it Louisiana isn't very popular right now on ar15.com, eh? :)

Yes, Blanco and Nagin are not exactly the poster-children for effective leadership, and we'll likely be doing something to fix that very soon. But in the meantime, our state is still totally fucked up from Katrina. People who were told they didn't need flood insurance are now sitting on big mortgages for worthless houses. I have flood insurance... lots of it. But I also understad how some people in areas that had never flooded before could think that they didn't need flood insurance. Regardless, I don't feel comfortable standing by as hundreds of thousands of families face financial ruin. And, on top of that, I would assume that 200,000+ foreclosures of this nature will affect the mortgage market nationwide. Simply ignoring these people is just plain wrong.

The failure of the federally-built levees are the reason why property damage was so high. We need to rebuild, and we also need to take steps to prevent this from happening in the future, and that takes money... lots of it.

--Mike



It was my understanding that a local committee that was supposed to be overseeing the maintenance of the levees (the ones that were worked on and faield) spent most fo their money and time jetting around the nation in a corporate jet purchased by them with federal dollars. Is this not so?
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 4:35:03 AM EDT
mcaswell,
Valid points all but think about it.
Your state elected (from top to bottom) poor money managers
AND
They screwed the preparedness pooch big time with Katrina.

It seems like giving them more will not translate to better services, just more of the same poor management...

I'd like to see them booted from office for thier inability to govern, NOT have them get MORE funds to misuse.

Living in NJ under Whorzine, I do feel yur pain.

Pete
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 11:10:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:
Nobody is proposing ignoring people.

The federal government has appointed billions to help, and private organizations have given additional billions of aid.


But these people ARE being ignored, at least in the context in which I am referring to. The money that's been allocated has been/is being used for many different tasks, but it won't help the well-over 200,000 people facing financial ruin.

There is the Baker Plan, universally supported by virtually all of the leadership and residents, that will buy flooded properties from homeowners who choose to participate. The homeowner does not walk away with every penny that their home was worth... they'd get about 60% of their equity, and the mortgage company would get a similar amount of the balance owed to them in exchange for forgiving the rest of the debt. In other words, homeowners are not given back 100% of what they had pre-Katrina, but they'd have enough to help them start over. That's one aspect of this plan, directly helping homeowners in devastated areas, and preventing the industry-wide financial hit from massive numbers of foreclosures.

The other aspect of the Baker Plan is that it would facilitate the rebuilding of the city. A few people with the means to do so are rebuilding. Others with the means are sitting back and waiting, not wanting to invest a mountain of money in rebuilding their home, only to end up with a really nice house in the middle of what resembles Somolia. The Baker Plan, after buying the destroyed homes, would then sell off the property to developers who would clear the property, rebuild infrastructure, and redevelop the area. Everyone, even those who don't choose to sell, benefits.

This plan is estimated to cost about $30 billion, but about half this money would be PAID BACK to the government as the properties were sold to developers.

It's not a perfect plan, but it's by far the best thing we've been able to come up with, and it is VITAL to the recovery of this area.

The Bush administration is not supportive of the Baker Plan. Their "alternative" is to use the $6 billion in community block grants to help about 20,000 of the affected homeowners. I'm sorry, but to me, that is IGNORING the other 200,000 people.

The massive federal aid that has been sent down here so far is very much appreciated, but it's not nearly enough to help these people get back on their feet.

As a side note, I've been following a story in the news that really illustrates federal bureaucracy. In the past I've heard comments like "for every $1 allocated to the welfare program, only 20 cents or so actually goes to welfare recipients... the rest is used for administrative costs." Well, here in St. Tammany Parish where I live, we had thousands of trees knocked down. FEMA told Parish government that they'd pay for most of the cost tree removal. The only catch is that the Parish must document each and every tree in excruciating detail. This includes using a GPS receiver to assertain the exact lat/lon of each tree. Of course, the problem is that GPS wil give the position to an accuracy of 15 or 30 feet, but there can be quite a number of trees in that space. So, FEMA is giving the Parish a hard time on some of these, because they see multiple trees listed with the same location. I'd be interested to know how much this, along with the other paperwork requirements, affect the final price of tree removal. I'm sure the cost to taxpayers would be DRASTICALLY reduced if FEMA were to, for example, simply utilize satellite imagery to estimate the number of downed trees, adding a little for a fudge factor, and write the check.

A similar story can be found with the trailers that FEMA is providing (about half the houses in my neighborhood have them). These basic, stripped down trailers end up costing approximately $70,000 each after transportation, hook-up, and eventual removal are factored in. Amazing.

My point is that, of the $85 billion in aid that has been cited, how much actual value is coming from that money vs. how much is being thrown away via bureaucratic red tape?



That doesn't mean that we are going to allow the rest of the nation to get told what to do by this incompetent hack of a governor.

Well, I can't argue with you about the "incompetent hack" comment... I don't like Blanco, never did, probably never will. But in this particular area, I support her 100%. Over half the oil in the Gulf comes through Louisiana. Give us our fair share, or that supply may very well be disrupted, with national consequences. This may sound extreme, but as a local radio guy said yesterday, we're backed into a corner, and have nothing to lose.


The levee problem wasn't the Feds fault.

Some of the blame certainly falls on the local levee boards. But the failure of these levees was NOT a "maintenance" issue, it was an engineering failure, and it is the Army Corps of Engineers who oversaw design and construction of the levee system.

--Mike
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 11:14:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mcaswell:
Well, I can't find my asbestos suit, but here goes anyway...

All we're asking for is our fair share of the royalties. Other states get much more than we do. We take the environmental hits from oil & gas companies, like carving canals through the coastal wetlands (which serve as a buffer for incoming hurricanes), but don't get much of the revenue compared to other states.

I haven't been around here much in the past several months, but I take it Louisiana isn't very popular right now on ar15.com, eh? :)

Yes, Blanco and Nagin are not exactly the poster-children for effective leadership, and we'll likely be doing something to fix that very soon. But in the meantime, our state is still totally fucked up from Katrina. People who were told they didn't need flood insurance are now sitting on big mortgages for worthless houses. I have flood insurance... lots of it. But I also understad how some people in areas that had never flooded before could think that they didn't need flood insurance. Regardless, I don't feel comfortable standing by as hundreds of thousands of families face financial ruin. And, on top of that, I would assume that 200,000+ foreclosures of this nature will affect the mortgage market nationwide. Simply ignoring these people is just plain wrong.

The failure of the federally-built levees are the reason why property damage was so high. We need to rebuild, and we also need to take steps to prevent this from happening in the future, and that takes money... lots of it.

--Mike



No offense, but not many other states have the same history of corruption and waste. There's a lot of that around but Louisiana has it down to a science.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 3:29:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By LArifleMAN:
She's such a cunt





Why would you insult cunts, sir????????????
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 3:31:54 PM EDT
The Mardi Gras tourism should be more than enough to carry them over.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 3:34:55 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 3:43:25 PM EDT
I remember a news story a few years ago on Dateline where LA police were stopping travellers on the interstates and shaking them down. Anyone carrying more than $100 was considered a drug dealer and had thier money and car confiscated.

Maybe they just need to lower the amount to $25 and they could get the revenue they need that way.
Top Top