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Posted: 6/4/2017 5:01:09 PM EDT
Been looking at getting a trailer for over a year now. I've been able to get by without so far, but that may change soon and I'm thinking up more and more uses for it.

Primary purpose is to haul a Kubota BX23 subcompact backhoe. But I'd also use it for hauling lawn tractors (sometimes possibly 2), quads, brush, firewood, building supplies, etc.. Current tow vehicle is a 2015 Toyota Tacoma.

Last year I was pretty well set on a 16' tandem landscape utility trailer with a folding gate. I liked the rails as additional tie-down points and both the rails and gate as kind of a last ditch safety if something I was hauling ever broke loose somehow, maybe it would help keep the cargo on the trailer until I could get stopped. I frequently borrow a single axle trailer from a friend for moving a quad or lawn tractor and I guess I'm just used to have a gate and those sides.

A guy at a trailer place was suggesting a car hauler type over the landscape for my purposes. I can see some perks, the biggest by far being if I ever wanted to load something from the side (ahead of the fenders anyway). I've also read that above 45-50 mph you start to really feel the fold up gate on a landscape trailer catching the wind. Most of my hauling would be very short trips, 5-10 miles and at somewhat slow speeds. But on occasion I might be on the highway too.

Any thoughts between the two?

On a separate note, I'm also debating between a trailer with a conventional paint finish versus powder coat. From what I've read, it seems like the powder coat is a lot tougher, but when it does chip the result may be worse and more difficult to deal with than simple paint. Any opinions?

Thanks
Link Posted: 6/4/2017 5:35:21 PM EDT
[#1]
That BX23 TLB is a heavy little machine. I'm too lazy to look but IIRC it is around 2700lb.  A 16' dual axle trailer with a gvwr of 7500 lbs would be the best bet.  You will also need loading ramps becuase of the angle of departure when laoding/unloading.  Is your Taco up to the task of pulling that load?  Don't know for sure but it may be fine. Definitely will need a trailer brake controller.
Link Posted: 6/4/2017 5:45:09 PM EDT
[#2]
Weight-wise it's on the higher end of what I'd want to pull with the Tacoma. The Tacoma's tow rating is 6500#. You're correct that the BX23 has a weight of 2700#. Combined with the trailer I'm estimating the total weight will be around 4500#. That's well within the tow rating, but I see a mixed bag of reports from people who have pulled that weight with their Tacomas. Some say it handles it great, others say they wouldn't want to do it often. That said, it kind of seems like a lot of people on the Tacoma forums are pulling campers, so I suppose they're dealing with a wind issue that I wouldn't see so much pulling a tractor.

Based on the weight, it will definitely be a dual axle trailer with electric brakes. In Pennsylvania it's a requirement to have brakes on both axles too, so that's not a question.

Already picked up a Tekonsha P3 brake controller. I had one trailer dealer (who always sells used and new tractors) tell me they'd be happy to hook up a trailer and let me try pulling it with the Tacoma. I'm wondering if they may be willing to load a comparable weight tractor on there for me too.
Link Posted: 6/4/2017 5:46:42 PM EDT
[#3]
One potential downside to the car hauler is it seems like most of them have dovetailed rear ends. I can't see myself ever hauling a car on this thing. I think I'd rather not have the dovetail so there's less likelihood of dragging the back end. I can see getting a mower deck hung up while loading, been there done that, but I've also found simply loading against even a mild hill solves that. Not always an option, but frequently is.
Link Posted: 6/4/2017 6:22:35 PM EDT
[#4]
I have a 16' landscape trailer with the expanded metal gate, I haul my BX2660 and My B3200 around all the time, the deck has never hung up loading, I like the side rails for tying off but I dont usually tie either of them down, short hauls around town. I dont really notice the BX on but I do the 3200 with a brush hog or something. Both tractors have loaders on them. Only one axle has breaks on this trailer, been intending to put them on the other axle, just haven't got around to it. My Silverado 1500 does not stop so good with the bigger tractor. I have thought many times about getting a new trailer just because this one is 30 years old but I dont know of any better set-up for what I do. Good luck man, I paid $1200 cash for this one brand new, now they are very expensive I hear. They really do last forever if you take care of them.
Link Posted: 6/4/2017 7:52:59 PM EDT
[#5]
I think motor-wise you would be fine with the Taco.  The problem is stopping all that weight.  Even with a trailer brake(the tekonsha is a great unit by the way) your pads and rotors are going to take a beating.  Ask if they will load a similar weight load and let you try it out.  If it doesn't feel right and a new truck is not an option you could always upgrade your brakes to a heavy duty/performance rotor and pad package for around $600 - $1000 if you do your own work.  Don't skimp on personal safety and whatever you end up with, keep us updated on what works for you. Have fun digging in the dirt!
Link Posted: 6/4/2017 10:19:47 PM EDT
[#6]
A set of bags on your rear axle would help level your truck under load. I defiantly agree on heavy duty break pads and rotors. I absolutely hate pulling a trailer with my Ford Ranger after using One Tons for years. I use a dual axle twelve foot trailer for my UTV's and small Kubota, but the little Ranger doesn't like it.
Link Posted: 6/4/2017 10:22:57 PM EDT
[#7]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
A set of bags on your rear axle would help level your truck under load. I defiantly agree on heavy duty break pads and rotors. I absolutely hate pulling a trailer with my Ford Ranger after using One Tons for years. I use a dual axle twelve foot trailer for my UTV's and small Kubota, but the little Ranger doesn't like it.
View Quote
Do you know what the tow rating is on your Ranger?

I hate to say it, but I partly wish I'd have gone with a Tundra now. I traded in my 2007 Tacoma for a 2015 Tacoma a little over two years ago. Generally I'm quite happy with the Tacoma over a full size, particularly if I go on a trip. But for some purposes a full size would certainly make things easier.
Link Posted: 6/4/2017 10:32:48 PM EDT
[#8]
Quoted:
Been looking at getting a trailer for over a year now. I've been able to get by without so far, but that may change soon and I'm thinking up more and more uses for it.

Primary purpose is to haul a Kubota BX23 subcompact backhoe. But I'd also use it for hauling lawn tractors (sometimes possibly 2), quads, brush, firewood, building supplies, etc.. Current tow vehicle is a 2015 Toyota Tacoma.

Last year I was pretty well set on a 16' tandem landscape utility trailer with a folding gate. I liked the rails as additional tie-down points and both the rails and gate as kind of a last ditch safety if something I was hauling ever broke loose somehow, maybe it would help keep the cargo on the trailer until I could get stopped. I frequently borrow a single axle trailer from a friend for moving a quad or lawn tractor and I guess I'm just used to have a gate and those sides.

A guy at a trailer place was suggesting a car hauler type over the landscape for my purposes. I can see some perks, the biggest by far being if I ever wanted to load something from the side (ahead of the fenders anyway). I've also read that above 45-50 mph you start to really feel the fold up gate on a landscape trailer catching the wind. Most of my hauling would be very short trips, 5-10 miles and at somewhat slow speeds. But on occasion I might be on the highway too.

Any thoughts between the two?

On a separate note, I'm also debating between a trailer with a conventional paint finish versus powder coat. From what I've read, it seems like the powder coat is a lot tougher, but when it does chip the result may be worse and more difficult to deal with than simple paint. Any opinions?

Thanks
View Quote


Sounds like for your needs either would be fine. I'd probably choose the car hauler type though for the reason you stated and also incase you ever needed to haul a car or truck somewhere.

Paint vs Powdercoat.... It hurts to say this, but on a trailer, paint is a much better choice.  None of the manufacturers do the right prep work before powder coating and it's good for about 5-6 years before it starts flaking off in chunks; in a Midwest environment anyway. I Just traded off a PJ trailer that was 6 years old which was powder coated. The thing looked 20 years old. I can prolly find a pic if you want to see...
Link Posted: 6/4/2017 11:03:52 PM EDT
[#9]
My concern about a landscape trailer folding gate would be how well expanded metal is going to hold up to the tractor weight loading/unloading over time.  If you go that route, you might want to consider getting a welding shop to beef up the portion the wheels would be traversing.  The car hauler would probably have separate ramps (pull out or hung on the sides) that can be positioned to match the width needed.

We went with a 7K  18' Aluma utility (like a car hauler, but with very low rails at front & sides) with a 2' dove tail & pull out ramps for hauling the 3038e & 1025R FILB around as needed.  The only issues when using it were related to low ground clearance at the rear. I ended up making a new mount for the plate above the deck because it got beat up too much in the original under-deck mount (lights were no problem, they are  built into the rear frame so no potential to snag or drag).   Also, longer can be better when it comes to getting your tongue weight right - you have more options position wise.

Nick
Link Posted: 6/5/2017 12:22:22 AM EDT
[#10]
If your pushing the limits of your truck, get a weight distribution hitch. Helps a lot.
Link Posted: 6/5/2017 12:29:41 AM EDT
[#11]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
If your pushing the limits of your truck, get a weight distribution hitch. Helps a lot.
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Figured I'd see how it goes before I do that, but chances are I'll end up with one. I'm not pushing the limits based on the numbers, but I think I may be based on the comments I'm finding online. That said, seems like a whole lot of the people who are pulling heavier loads with their Tacomas are pulling campers, which would have a lot more wind resistance than I'll be dealing with.
Link Posted: 6/5/2017 12:31:40 AM EDT
[#12]
Starting to like the idea of this one:

http://www.bigtextrailers.com/60ch-tandem-axle-car-hauler-special/

Car hauler, no rails or gate but lots of pockets for tie-downs and spots to install sides I could build. Yet no dovetail that I may be dragging on the ground a lot.
Link Posted: 6/5/2017 12:46:33 AM EDT
[#13]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Starting to like the idea of this one:

http://www.bigtextrailers.com/60ch-tandem-axle-car-hauler-special/

Car hauler, no rails or gate but lots of pockets for tie-downs and spots to install sides I could build. Yet no dovetail that I may be dragging on the ground a lot.
View Quote
That's what I pictured when you said car hauler.   The stake pockets could easily be used to build sides if you wanted them.
Link Posted: 6/5/2017 12:47:51 AM EDT
[#14]
Also, Dexter axles are the go to when it comes to trailer axles.
Link Posted: 6/5/2017 1:43:03 AM EDT
[#15]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Figured I'd see how it goes before I do that, but chances are I'll end up with one. I'm not pushing the limits based on the numbers, but I think I may be based on the comments I'm finding online. That said, seems like a whole lot of the people who are pulling heavier loads with their Tacomas are pulling campers, which would have a lot more wind resistance than I'll be dealing with.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
If your pushing the limits of your truck, get a weight distribution hitch. Helps a lot.
Figured I'd see how it goes before I do that, but chances are I'll end up with one. I'm not pushing the limits based on the numbers, but I think I may be based on the comments I'm finding online. That said, seems like a whole lot of the people who are pulling heavier loads with their Tacomas are pulling campers, which would have a lot more wind resistance than I'll be dealing with.
Read your manual, chances are it requires a WDH for the weights you have in mind. The Tundra requires a WDH with trailer weights over 5000lbs if I remember correctly. Just googled Tacoma specs and your tongue weight max is 640 assuming you have the tow package. Just watch your weights and how you load the trailer and you may be ok.

Also the poster who doesn't tie down his equipment should be horsewhipped if he exceeds jogging pace. Even the under-sized cargo straps many people use could make the difference between a fender bender that people walk away from and a tractor through someone's windshield.

On the bright side, the Tacoma holds its value and the Tundra is more suited for the work...
Link Posted: 6/5/2017 9:00:32 AM EDT
[#16]
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Quoted:
Do you know what the tow rating is on your Ranger?

I hate to say it, but I partly wish I'd have gone with a Tundra now. I traded in my 2007 Tacoma for a 2015 Tacoma a little over two years ago. Generally I'm quite happy with the Tacoma over a full size, particularly if I go on a trip. But for some purposes a full size would certainly make things easier.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
A set of bags on your rear axle would help level your truck under load. I defiantly agree on heavy duty break pads and rotors. I absolutely hate pulling a trailer with my Ford Ranger after using One Tons for years. I use a dual axle twelve foot trailer for my UTV's and small Kubota, but the little Ranger doesn't like it.
Do you know what the tow rating is on your Ranger?

I hate to say it, but I partly wish I'd have gone with a Tundra now. I traded in my 2007 Tacoma for a 2015 Tacoma a little over two years ago. Generally I'm quite happy with the Tacoma over a full size, particularly if I go on a trip. But for some purposes a full size would certainly make things easier.
5,500# It's 4X4 with the V6. But it still sucks to pull a trailer with. But then again I'm not fond of pulling trailers with 1/2tons either. I would definitely look at tandem axles for even small loads.
Link Posted: 6/5/2017 5:42:51 PM EDT
[#17]
I have a 16' landscape trailer from a local manufacturer.   I find the rails to be useful and have made sides I can attach to haul mulch.  I'm glad I made the choice over a car hauler when I was in your shoes as I didn't really recognize the added benefits at the time.   Check the manufacturers specs on the gate.  Some of the ones I looked at were around 1,000 pounds capacity and some were a good bit more.   I haul my 8N Ford on it, which weighs more than 3,000, but less than 4,000 pounds all in.  The weight distributing hitch is definitely recommended!
Link Posted: 6/5/2017 11:32:36 PM EDT
[#18]
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Quoted:
Also, Dexter axles are the go to when it comes to trailer axles.
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Quoted:
Also, Dexter axles are the go to when it comes to trailer axles.
Good to know, thanks.

Quoted:
That's what I pictured when you said car hauler.   The stake pockets could easily be used to build sides if you wanted them.
That's what I figure. Building walls would be easier on a trailer with rails, but this leaves me with more options I think. Still on the fence between car hauler and landscape, but starting to lean car hauler I think.

Quoted:
I have a 16' landscape trailer from a local manufacturer.   I find the rails to be useful and have made sides I can attach to haul mulch.  I'm glad I made the choice over a car hauler when I was in your shoes as I didn't really recognize the added benefits at the time.   Check the manufacturers specs on the gate.  Some of the ones I looked at were around 1,000 pounds capacity and some were a good bit more.   I haul my 8N Ford on it, which weighs more than 3,000, but less than 4,000 pounds all in.  The weight distributing hitch is definitely recommended!
Do you find the rails useful for anything else? How often do you find they're in your way? The ramps on the landscape trailers I'm looking at are rated for around 4000# supposedly, so I should be good.
Link Posted: 6/6/2017 7:27:54 PM EDT
[#19]
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Quoted:


Do you find the rails useful for anything else? How often do you find they're in your way? The ramps on the landscape trailers I'm looking at are rated for around 4000# supposedly, so I should be good.
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The rails are useful for tying off light or odd shaped cargo (especially furniture), pinning in cargo (think a row of firewood or coolers for deer camp), and as I mentioned they make it easy to attach sides.  The only time the rails have been in the way for my uses is when attempting to haul two golf carts for sporting clays.  They would have fit if it were not for the high rail in the front and landscape gate.
Link Posted: 6/6/2017 10:57:10 PM EDT
[#20]
I have had straps break while hauling my utv's. Yeah I really like the rails...
Link Posted: 6/6/2017 11:12:40 PM EDT
[#21]
If I get a car hauler type, I'll build removable rails/walls. Just need to decide if that's worth doing or if I should just get the landscape trailer and be done with it.

I found this one: http://www.bigtextrailers.com/50la-tandem-axle-utility/

Has rails but no gate. I have to say, I kind of like that. Used to be I really wanted a gate, but people say they really catch wind and I also like the idea of being able to let something stick out a little past the back if I really need to.
Link Posted: 6/7/2017 12:22:27 AM EDT
[#22]
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Quoted:
If I get a car hauler type, I'll build removable rails/walls. Just need to decide if that's worth doing or if I should just get the landscape trailer and be done with it.

I found this one: http://www.bigtextrailers.com/50la-tandem-axle-utility/

Has rails but no gate. I have to say, I kind of like that. Used to be I really wanted a gate, but people say they really catch wind and I also like the idea of being able to let something stick out a little past the back if I really need to.
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Looks like a nice trailer. Hope that meets your needs.
Link Posted: 6/7/2017 6:45:34 AM EDT
[#23]
What about a 7x16 Dump trailer with some ramps? My BIL used to use one to tow his Kubota.
Link Posted: 6/7/2017 7:36:20 AM EDT
[#24]
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Quoted:
What about a 7x16 Dump trailer with some ramps? My BIL used to use one to tow his Kubota.
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Don't want to spend that much, plus any dump trailer is likely going to be too heavy with the Kubota to pull with the Tacoma.
Link Posted: 6/7/2017 8:41:05 AM EDT
[#25]
Get the car hauler. Build the sides for when needed.

6k vs 5k weight rating plus way more versatile.    
Link Posted: 6/10/2017 7:50:30 PM EDT
[#26]
Looked at a few trailers today. Nearly bought a Big Tex 60CH car hauler. It's built a little lighter than some; GVWR was 6000#. But given that I'm pulling with the Tacoma, I kind of like that it's a little lighter, around 1460#. No dovetail, which I also sort of like since I will likely only ever be hauling tractors and items I would load by hand. I don't see myself ever loading a car.

Also looked at a Quality (Baron) trailer. Built a little heavier, price was similar. 7000# GVWR. I can't find a weight listed on a website anywhere, but the dealer is telling me it weighs about 1900#. Seems like substantially more weight.

They each have their pros and cons, but I'm kind of leaning toward going back and getting that 60CH.
Link Posted: 6/10/2017 10:46:53 PM EDT
[#27]
Link Posted: 6/11/2017 11:09:10 AM EDT
[#28]
I have had a couple trailers with pretty big gates.  They are not solid so they let air through but I am sure they do add some drag to things.

Look at one and you can probably just push the gate sideways and it comes right off.  Now some are heavy so you might need help lining it back up to put on.  My uncle does it by himself on a 6x10 single axle steel utility trailer I own half of.  Tailgate is fine for quads and mowers and stuff, I would expect a 2k lb tractor to bend it or break it.  If I had to load it I would bring my 2x12 ramps probably.  You can reinforce things to work, depends if you want to mess with it.

A car trailer might be worth the cost because it is probably more mass produced and what not.

After loading some things from the side in odd ways I am tired of wheel wells.  I want a deck over.  But those tend to catch wind as well, and sit higher so load is higher.

If you think you might ever go bigger on the tractor, consider that with this trailer purchase.

With a car trailer if you wanted to haul mulch or something I would consider buying some of those 330 gallon plastic water totes and cutting the top open on em.  If you have forks for the tractor you should now be able to get your load of mulch and then unload and haul the tote with your tractor.

I don't know if the totes would handle dirt or gravel, but mulch should not matter much.

If doing a big job I often found it better to have a big dump truck bring in a single monster load, and then the bobcat or tractor gets to work.  Vs. hauling 6 or 8 or more loads back and forth with me and a truck and trailer.

Now on a car trailer with the open middle, I would make some wood planks to fill it in most likely, I despise open middle trailers if doing something other than hauling a car. 

Tie downs and other stuff can be added or figured out.  When younger I did all kinds of silly stuff with u-haul trailers but they were willing to rent me a trailer when I could not afford one and it can be used in many ways.
Link Posted: 6/11/2017 11:42:56 PM EDT
[#29]
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Quoted:


I have a long-running trailer thread in which the folks here helped me choose a trailer, which I then purchased and am still learning to back.  

Anyway....I do not feel the drag of the gate (mesh) at interstate speeds.  I have paid attention to this, and I don't notice a significant drag.

I drive about like you do mostly  10-15 mile trips into town, hauling my equipment to manage a city property. (nothing as heavy as a tractor though).

I have had it on the interstate though, several times now, and I don't notice a difference even at 70 mph.


ETA:  I have already encountered the need to have something stick out the back of the trailer.  This is a significant consideration.
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Thanks for the post. I'm getting mixed feedback now about the wind drag of a gate. I've mentioned it to a few dealers and all of them seemed to kind of scoff at it. But I've read a lot of posts from people on forums who say they do experience it.

My bigger concern is being able to have something stick out the back if I want, so I'm thinking I should probably stay clear of the gates and stick with ramps.
Link Posted: 6/12/2017 11:39:19 AM EDT
[#30]
I mentioned in my other post I have an uncle who takes a gate off by himself.  It just slides off the hinge pins.  When installed the side latches that hold it up keep it from moving sideways, so not hard to slide it sideways with those off.

Another thing you can do with a gate is use it to extend the length of your trailer.

You have to rig up something to hold the gate in the extended flat position but think of taking the braces that hold the gate in the upright position and adding a brace or something and being able to run a support down to the gate.

This really extends length and can cause it to drag easily, but depending on what you are hauling it can help a lot of it is long and flexible.

I am not all for ramp gate things, but I have modified stuff over the years and done some odd stuff with trailers.
Link Posted: 6/12/2017 5:00:44 PM EDT
[#31]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Starting to like the idea of this one:

http://www.bigtextrailers.com/60ch-tandem-axle-car-hauler-special/

Car hauler, no rails or gate but lots of pockets for tie-downs and spots to install sides I could build. Yet no dovetail that I may be dragging on the ground a lot.
View Quote
I have that trailer, bought it new in 1999. It trails well, reliable, and I've had it slightly overloaded a few times. The problems I've had with it are minimal, and mostly due to human error. The ramps hook over a bar across the back, I  bent the bar loading a skid loader. Ok, so I more than slightly exceeded the weight limit.
The tail lights on my trailer are very exposed and I've broken 3 or 4 of them. Two years ago I replaced the deck, it rotted out due to leaving stuff on the deck for a year which held moisture and rotted the boards.

When loading it to max, put blocks under the rear to prevent the tongue from lifting the  tow vehicle.
Link Posted: 6/13/2017 1:32:13 PM EDT
[#32]
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Quoted:


Thanks for the post. I'm getting mixed feedback now about the wind drag of a gate. I've mentioned it to a few dealers and all of them seemed to kind of scoff at it. But I've read a lot of posts from people on forums who say they do experience it.

My bigger concern is being able to have something stick out the back if I want, so I'm thinking I should probably stay clear of the gates and stick with ramps.
View Quote
It sure as hell does. I just returned from a trip to Florida helping a friend move. My truck normally gets between 14 and 15 MPG. On the trip down I only averaged 10. On the trip back with an empty trailer, 12. Its a 5x10 single axle utility trailer with a 4 foot ramp gate. I didn't feel the drag from the gate, but I could see it in fuel economy.
Link Posted: 6/14/2017 12:05:50 AM EDT
[#33]
Not sure what the deal is with the beaver tail.

Trailer decks are all roughly the same height, you are still going to have the breakover angle whether you have a beaver tail or not... just 1/3 of the needed ramping distance is attached to the trailer adding more length and less ramp for you to monkey around with.

Unless you are talking about the trailers where the deck jacks up... those things are freaky to load and you better hope everything is dry.  I rented one of those once.  Drive up there ready for it to flip over backwards, shut it off, leave it in gear, set the parking brake as hard as possible... very softly scurry down and out of the way because you just know the thing is going to come sliding down if you disturb it and hurriedly let the thing down before something major happens.

I haul my tractors around with dad's 18' car trailer, they load like a dream.  My C Allis is about the closest thing to your Kubota's given weight I have and I suspect a late model midsize would pull it fine.

My '02 F-150 toys with it, perfect balance of just enough weight to keep the trailer from bouncing but yet not enough for the truck to really care.
Link Posted: 6/14/2017 12:19:10 AM EDT
[#34]
I used to assume the beaver tail or dovetail was intended to split the angle change up into two softer angles rather than one sharp one. But I think you're right, it's just a way of lengthening the ramp without lengthening the ramps you have to handle. I pulled out the ramps on a dovetail trailer Saturday and mounted they ended up being roughly the same angle as the dovetail.

I would rather not have the dovetail simply because I may occasionally pull the trailer off the road onto uneven terrain or perhaps in a field and I don't want to have issues with the back end bottoming out. That said, I also don't want to have issues with mower decks hanging up on the trailer bed when I crest the top of the ramps.

Right now I frequently borrow a friend's single axle trailer with fold down ramp. Mower decks always hang up on that thing. My solution is to either prop up the end of the gate a bit while it's on the ground, or to try to back the trailer toward a hill or even just a very light slope so that the ramp isn't angling down the full height of the deck. A trailer salesman last Saturday also suggested just running the jack down on the tongue some, even if it's on a vehicle, to get the nose of the trailer up and soften the angle.
Link Posted: 6/14/2017 12:28:56 AM EDT
[#35]
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Quoted:


I have that trailer, bought it new in 1999. It trails well, reliable, and I've had it slightly overloaded a few times. The problems I've had with it are minimal, and mostly due to human error. The ramps hook over a bar across the back, I  bent the bar loading a skid loader. Ok, so I more than slightly exceeded the weight limit.
The tail lights on my trailer are very exposed and I've broken 3 or 4 of them. Two years ago I replaced the deck, it rotted out due to leaving stuff on the deck for a year which held moisture and rotted the boards.

When loading it to max, put blocks under the rear to prevent the tongue from lifting the  tow vehicle.
View Quote
Good to hear of some firsthand experience with the 60CH. I'm curious, how heavy was the skid steer? Did you end up hauling it or abandon that attempt after the ramp bar bent?
Link Posted: 6/21/2017 9:57:35 PM EDT
[#36]
I was pretty close to the point of buying a Big Tex 60CH car hauler. Kept exploring though, wanted to cover the bases and be sure that's what I wanted. I've since gone back to landscape trailers again. Strongly looking at a PJ U7 or U8 landscape utility trailer, 16' tandem. It will have a gate, which most of the time I will like anyway for loading things. The gate can be removed if need be though. One thing I really like about it though, it has side rails like a landscape trailer, but they are removable. So if I ever want to load something from the side, they don't have to get in my way. Overall the PJs seem to have some well thought out features. And the dry weight of the trailer isn't too terrible.

I have to drive at least a couple of hours to get one though, and it will be out of state.

One decision I have to make on this one, 77" or 83" wide. I'll never haul a car on it, so that's not an issue. The only things I can see loading that could be an issue are some mower decks. The one I expect to load and haul for sure though is a 5' mower deck under my BX23. It's 72.6" wide, so it doesn't leave me with much play on each side, although that's not figuring in lifting up the chute which will get me some space. Bottom line, it's doable. My parents and a friend each have 6' mower decks; I'd like to be able to move theirs too but really can't imagine why I would ever need to. If for some reason the day comes when we want to, we can always just haul the mower deck off the tractor. I figure 77" is more maneuverable than 83", but honestly the bigger reason I'm looking at the 77" is I can get it for about $500-600 cheaper right now. I think for that, it's probably worth a slightly narrower bed.
Link Posted: 6/21/2017 10:06:39 PM EDT
[#37]
Link Posted: 6/21/2017 10:15:48 PM EDT
[#38]
Haha, thanks for the advice about the ninjas, I'll be sure to secure it properly.

The width thing is really a tough one for me. That extra 6" I can see coming in handy, but $500-600 is a steep price to pay for it.

The rails I think I'll find very useful when hauling things like furniture, things like that that can be blocked in against the rails, then tied down. The rails I expect will be nice for securing things with rope too. And I like them as an added safety when hauling quads or a tractor in case something breaks lose, maybe the rails keep it on the trailer long enough for me to get pulled over. But I will indeed want walls too. I'll build walls for it, something easily removable that I can just install when appropriate, like when hauling limbs or something. My vision for the walls I'd build for a car hauler actually might have been easier, but being that these rails are removable it opens up my options.
Link Posted: 6/21/2017 10:51:19 PM EDT
[#39]
The landscaping trailers with the gate ramps will disappoint you. Your tractor will bend the shit out of the ramp after a few uses. If the ramp is built stout enough to not bend you won't be able to pick it up on your own.

Don't worry about getting side rails. They will make using the trailer a pain and will limit what and how you can haul things. You can't load from any angle and you can't have things hang over.  If you need a weird strap point or want something to keep from moving screw some blocks into your wood deck, that's why they are made of wood.  If you need rails build your own from wood.

Quit looking at trailers with ramps. Go find a good used tilt deck, they are way nicer and tons easier to use. Put a hydraulic lockout on the cylinder and you can load a couple quads side by side while it's tilted.
Link Posted: 6/21/2017 10:56:13 PM EDT
[#40]
Link Posted: 6/21/2017 11:00:41 PM EDT
[#41]
There's potentially a couple reasons for the price difference. There are no PJ dealers near me that carry these kinds of trailers. I have to look out of state. I found two dealers in one state that each have a few of the 83" wide models, and they're asking about $3k. Then I found one dealer in a different state, that also happens to be going out of business, that had a couple of the 77" models for about $550 less. So it may be related to them going out of business, or it may be related to the fact that they're in a different state. The PJ website has payment calculators, I assume for factory direct sales? Anyway their payments between these two models aren't that different.
Link Posted: 6/22/2017 7:01:00 PM EDT
[#42]
I went through my archive tonight and I could only find one photo of my trailer and it does not show the tailgate. I can take some tomorrow while at work and post them here.
Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 6/22/2017 10:04:39 PM EDT
[#43]
Link Posted: 6/23/2017 11:52:40 PM EDT
[#44]
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Quoted:
Good to hear of some firsthand experience with the 60CH. I'm curious, how heavy was the skid steer? Did you end up hauling it or abandon that attempt after the ramp bar bent?
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I have that trailer, bought it new in 1999. It trails well, reliable, and I've had it slightly overloaded a few times. The problems I've had with it are minimal, and mostly due to human error. The ramps hook over a bar across the back, I  bent the bar loading a skid loader. Ok, so I more than slightly exceeded the weight limit.
The tail lights on my trailer are very exposed and I've broken 3 or 4 of them. Two years ago I replaced the deck, it rotted out due to leaving stuff on the deck for a year which held moisture and rotted the boards.

When loading it to max, put blocks under the rear to prevent the tongue from lifting the  tow vehicle.
Good to hear of some firsthand experience with the 60CH. I'm curious, how heavy was the skid steer? Did you end up hauling it or abandon that attempt after the ramp bar bent?
I kept using it. Maybe not smart, but the bend is not horrible, just one of those things that when you notice it you go "oh shit".  Not sure of the weight of the skidsteer, but it was a small one. Thinking back, I'm not sure if it was the skid loader, or the Massey Harris 30  tractor which bent the bars. The bars probably bent once when I was off a bit when loading. The tractor has narrow front so I had 4 ramps, the 2 for the trailer lined up for the rear tires, and 2 others for the front tires. MH30 weigh between 3500 to 5200 pounds, mine is probably around 4000 pounds as setup with a belly mower.

I just remembered one more thing, when I bought the skidsteer, I loaded it behind the barn at a neighbor. There was a sharp divot when leaving, and the weight of the skidsteer was a bit too far forward. The jack hit the ground and bent backwards a bit. Yes, it was screwed up all the way.
Link Posted: 6/28/2017 11:17:11 PM EDT
[#45]
Finally picked up a trailer today. Went with a PJ Utility, 16' tandem. Haven't hauled anything with it yet obviously, but towed it about 120 miles home. Tows pretty nice empty anyway; way smoother than the single axles I've used.

I looked at a lot of trailers. I have to say, I'm most impressed with this PJ trailer. The welds are clean, wiring is by far the cleanest I've seen, the lighting isn't mounted in places where it's bound to be broken off. Aluminum fenders I think are a good idea, no rust and they're removable for when it's time to touch up the paint or if something gets damaged. The rails are removable which I really like. I went back and forth on car hauler or utility many times largely because there were pros and cons to the rails. I figure this gives me the best of both worlds. I've read some people had some problems with the powder coat on PJs, so we'll see how that turns out.

Hope it hauls well. I'll probably use it this weekend.



Link Posted: 6/28/2017 11:27:55 PM EDT
[#46]
Link Posted: 6/29/2017 2:34:42 PM EDT
[#47]
Nice!   Thanks for the follow up.
Link Posted: 7/16/2017 12:45:55 AM EDT
[#48]
First time towing the Kubota with FEL and BH (2700#) today. I took it slow. Wasn't sure of what to expect pulling with the Tacoma. In the end, I was pretty impressed. I upped the boost setting on the control one level. Stopping was no problem, trailer brakes felt just right. The Tacoma had no real issue getting the trailer moving, even on some steep hills. It pulled and rode very nice, I think nicer than a single axle trailer with a much lighter load.

Pics because this is ARF...

About to load up for the first time. I didn't bother blocking up the rear of the trailer today, thought I'd see what it does. For a moment when the tractor was on the far rear of the trailer, it certainly does lift the rear of the Tacoma up a little; not to the point of being off the ground but up high enough that if I was loading/unloading on a hill I'll definitely be blocking up the back.



Loaded:



Chaining it up. I have two 20' long 5/16" chains. I wanted a 4-point tie-down. Rather than chop the chains, I picked up four hooks and some hair pins. I attached the hooks at points on the chains to get a 4-point tie-down without chopping the chains. What I really like about this is that for moving other things, I can always move those hooks to other positions. This is why I got the hair pins for the clevis pins on the hooks, as you can see in the pic. This way I can easily move them around.





Loaded and chained:





Took it over to the property briefly, just for kicks really. Used it to push a couple dead trees that were covered in poison ivy off the trail in the back. Not much else to do there at the moment.





Loaded back up, ready to head back home.

Link Posted: 7/17/2017 5:01:40 PM EDT
[#49]
Wow, looks great man, you got everything together real well. Tractor looks kick-ass on that trailer, trailer looks kick ass behind the Toyota!
You did well!
Looks like a nice piece of property.
How far is that from your home? How far are you trailing?
How do you keep that property mowed?
What is the main use for the property?
Just being nosy.
I have a few pieces of property I keep mowed.
I rent most of it to a farmer. I just mow the entryways and edges on
3 pieces of raw land, 70 acres, 40 acres, 35 acres, plus a 11 acre driving range and my house.
I move my Kubotas around weekly in the summer, my whole life seems to be mowing or brush-hogging this time of year.
You might need to find the right spot on the trailer to park the Kubota, too far back and the trailer gets squirrely, too far front and the front of the truck gets too light.
It dont matter much on the back roads but you really see it on the highway. Most of the time I just but the bucket against the front rails on the trailer.
Like I said though, I never tie them down.
Congrats man, you did well.
Link Posted: 7/17/2017 5:11:43 PM EDT
[#50]
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