Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
PSA
Member Login

Site Notices
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 4/26/2011 6:40:07 PM EDT
I've been considering getting involved in HAM radio operation, how important do you consider it as a prep?
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 6:52:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2011 3:36:41 AM EDT by Waldo]

Removed~ Waldo
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 6:56:45 PM EDT
Quite important.  There could be situations where you may have to bug out for extended periods.  Having a communication medium to gather intel will be crucial.  Much of what may need to be done could be a death sentence if you put your self into a situation that you can't afford to be wrong about.  



The last thing I want is to run up on a blockade/ambush of Obama parasites when I'm trying to egress my family to another location.  We'll have to work to together with like minded folks to make things work.  Communication is paramount.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 6:58:16 PM EDT
if cells go kaput.....and power is gone.....this will be the way to transmit ans receive info....
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 7:08:04 PM EDT
Absolutely!

HF allows you to have long range comms from the statewide level all the way up to the other side of the world.  
VHF/UHF covers local communication well (from 0-60 miles for repeaters and 0-15ish for simplex).
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 7:08:30 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Echo2:
if cells go kaput.....and power is gone.....this will be the way to transmit ans receive info....


+1  


Link Posted: 4/26/2011 7:18:14 PM EDT
Excellent!  What do the Altoids do?
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 7:20:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/26/2011 7:38:23 PM EDT by BigDaddy0004]
Originally Posted By cbPatriot:
Excellent!  What do the Altoids do?

It's an impedance matching transformer for random wire antennas.  Banana jacks on the input (antenna) side and BNC on the output (radio) side.
The 2 OD things to the right of the Altoids tin are wire antenna reels.  Each is filled with 50' of 26awg insulated stranded wire terminated in banana plugs.  Reel 'em out and throw one end up in a tree and talk to Boris and Natasha in Moscow.  


Link Posted: 4/26/2011 7:32:56 PM EDT
Mos' def.

The little rig below can...

–– Work point-to-point tactical (simplex), via ham repeaters (which are everywhere) on VHF and UHF (6m/2m/70cm) , and local/regional/national/worldwide comms via any one of the ham HF bands (160/80/60/40/30/20/17/15/12/10 meters)

–– Its transmit modes include FM, AM, single sideband voice, CW (Morse code), and scores of digital modes using any PC and free software.

–– Can receive AM/FM broadcasts, shortwave, aviation, CB, Marine VHF, public safety, commercial, NOAA weather, and on and on.

–– Runs on nearly any DC 12 volt power source and many great antennas can be made from a spool of 14awg stranded wire from Home Depot.

–– The rig itself (a Yaesu FT-857D) is about the size of a compact CB radio. The automatic antenna tuner below it is even smaller.

So yeah, ham radio (meaning the equipment, license and knowledge/experience to use it) is absolutely integral to prudent preparations. Oh, and it's fun.

Link Posted: 4/26/2011 7:52:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By jj01:
I've been considering getting involved in HAM radio operation, how important do you consider it as a prep?


here is a thread for your late-night reading pleasure ––> Ham Radio 101

ar-jedi
































Link Posted: 4/26/2011 7:59:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
snip... bunch of sweet pics.

Geek  
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 8:06:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By BigDaddy0004:
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
snip... bunch of sweet pics.

Geek  

previously, you wrote,

It's an impedance matching transformer for random wire antennas. Banana jacks on the input (antenna) side and BNC on the output (radio) side.  The 2 OD things to the right of the Altoids tin are wire antenna reels. Each is filled with 50' of 26awg insulated stranded wire terminated in banana plugs.

what language is that?

ar-jedi
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 8:19:04 PM EDT
Great landscaping to boot!
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 8:19:55 PM EDT
LOL.  I had a feeling the Altoids were functional and not just an affectation.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 8:28:01 PM EDT
It was certainly handy listening to the storm chasers and W0STL (National Weather Service - STL) giving details on where the tornados were at last Friday as they tore across St. Louis.  Missed me by about 2 miles.  Technician is both easy and cheap to get into.  Make your own call.  General takes a bit more, but by the time you get to Technician you'll know whether you want to move up to General.
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 9:01:02 PM EDT
Wow... This forces me to re-think the very core of my fundamental belief system. A true conundrum....

I usually have to know somebody before I hate 'em!

Link Posted: 4/26/2011 9:09:52 PM EDT
Less important than food, water, ammo and firearms. But still on my list!!!
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 9:32:50 PM EDT
My main fear is when SHTF, repeaters will not be available. How far can you communicate w/o repeaters ?
Link Posted: 4/26/2011 10:15:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/26/2011 10:21:32 PM EDT by Gamma762]
Originally Posted By Pauperis:
My main fear is when SHTF, repeaters will not be available. How far can you communicate w/o repeaters ?

Nationwide/worldwide, on HF (shortwave) frequencies (depending on ionospheric conditions).

From a reasonable base antenna, VHF can do dozens to a hundred miles or more, or even further using weak signal modes (SSB, CW, etc)

Mobile to mobile using good radios and antennas can go roughly 15 miles, give or take depending on terrain, band, etc.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 5:11:17 AM EDT
Yep , My base antenna can simplex on vhf for about 2 counties in each direction to other bases ,of course HF is world wide .


Originally Posted By Gamma762:



Originally Posted By Pauperis:

My main fear is when SHTF, repeaters will not be available. How far can you communicate w/o repeaters ?


Nationwide/worldwide, on HF (shortwave) frequencies (depending on ionospheric conditions).



From a reasonable base antenna, VHF can do dozens to a hundred miles or more, or even further using weak signal modes (SSB, CW, etc)



Mobile to mobile using good radios and antennas can go roughly 15 miles, give or take depending on terrain, band, etc.






 
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 6:06:42 AM EDT
Ah, you're a Harney and Sons man.  I knew I liked you, ar-jedi.  I'm more of a Twinings devotee, myself.  Unless, of course, that H&S is just an impedance transformer.  ;)

And to answer the OP...let's take it back to the rule of threes.  You can survive three days without water, three weeks without food, three months without hope.  How long can you survive without community?  Without intelligence (the information kind)?  Commo equals both.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 8:12:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2011 8:24:33 AM EDT by Duggan]
Cool toys and a fun tech hobby, but essential to survival? I think not.

I'd estimate their usefulness is about 1,000 times overstated by those looking to justify the expense and the legitimacy of the hobby.

I suppose I can see their practical use IF you have a large group of people that is scattered, everyone has a HAM, there's no other means of communication and it's still viable to travel in the AO in order to meet up.

As far as the "learning what's happening from others" ... sorry, not buying it.  As a single guy without reachable family, group or BOL to go to, I really couldn't care less what others are doing.

The idea that I'm going to be sitting in my living room, listening to my HAM with the same leisure that I'd be watching the news on a normal night, is rather laughable in my opinion.  I dare say I'll have more important things to worry about than what a bunch of strangers on the radio are saying.

Even more laughable is the idea of taking a radio with me in my BOB ... utter waste of space and weight.

It's a cool hobby, for sure, and it appeals to the tech minded ... but I think those involved VASTLY overstate the practical uses in times of distress.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 9:00:01 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Duggan:
Cool toys and a fun tech hobby, but essential to survival? I think not.

I'd estimate their usefulness is about 1,000 times overstated by those looking to justify the expense and the legitimacy of the hobby.

I suppose I can see their practical use IF you have a large group of people that is scattered, everyone has a HAM, there's no other means of communication and it's still viable to travel in the AO in order to meet up.

As far as the "learning what's happening from others" ... sorry, not buying it.  As a single guy without reachable family, group or BOL to go to, I really couldn't care less what others are doing.

The idea that I'm going to be sitting in my living room, listening to my HAM with the same leisure that I'd be watching the news on a normal night, is rather laughable in my opinion.  I dare say I'll have more important things to worry about than what a bunch of strangers on the radio are saying.

Even more laughable is the idea of taking a radio with me in my BOB ... utter waste of space and weight.

It's a cool hobby, for sure, and it appeals to the tech minded ... but I think those involved VASTLY overstate the practical uses in times of distress.


Buddy in 3rd world countries it's often times the major method of communication in any disaster, floods, earth quakes, turmoil, gov unrest

You are SADLY mistaken.  While yes it may not be the all in one amazing solution but com is better than no com PERIOD

if shtf and ur sitting in a dark house and no tv, no radio, no internet

national guard patrolling streets telling you not to leave your home or whatever.. you better damn believe you're gonna want a radio to find out what the heck is going on
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 9:05:41 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Duggan:


Wow. Guess I'll keep wasting space and justifying expenses.

I don't suppose you'd allow the possibility that folks with a good preparedness mindset might have the maturity to distinguish between hobby and utility while recognizing the two aren't mutually exclusive. The obvious example is guns –– we have hundreds people on SF who are gun enthusiasts but will admit in a second that they recognize 1) which guns are actually practical for hard times and 2) they didn't buy their massive collection for "SHTF" but because they simply enjoy the hobby. Doesn't mean they aren't prepared with practical defensive firearms as well, but hobby and utility can easily coexist.

Ham radio is no different. I'd say I'm probably one of the least hobby-oriented active hams I know that still put effort into learning the science, operating skill, and regulations to allow me to take full advantage of the amateur service. I have very minimal equipment compared to hobby-minded hams –– the money I could have spent on additional radio gear, I divested to other prep areas because the radios were essentially "covered."

Lastly, I humbly submit that much of your skepticism is linked to a lack of knowledge of how broad the amateur radio service is. Perhaps your picture of ham radio is limited to a smelly, fat, grouchy 65-year-old smoking a cigar while tapping on a Morse key in front of a wall of tube-driven sheet metal transmitters. There are those guys, and there are also guys in their 20's and 30's getting licensed and equipped solely to augment the communications component of their personal/family preparedness plan.

Believe it or not, some of us like to go beyond buying a battery powered AM/FM/WX radio and calling it a day.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 9:17:00 AM EDT
I realize the scope and the capability ... I've lurked a decent amount on the HAM forums and have considered getting into it, as it looks fun and potentially useful.

That said, the question the OP asked was "how important?".  My answer, for me, is "not very".

I'm not saying there's no possible survival use, that's foolish ... but it's certainly not a prioirty (for me) and would be even less of a priority if I was on foot and had to bear the weight of everything I chose to bring.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 9:28:02 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By jj01:
I've been considering getting involved in HAM radio operation, how important do you consider it as a prep?


here is a thread for your late-night reading pleasure ––> Ham Radio 101

ar-jedi

That's an impressive thread you put together, thank you for taking the time to do so. Your setup rig looks awsome and a bit intimidating.


How expensive of a habbit is this going to be?
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 9:42:57 AM EDT
Understood. I realize I'm not selling you, that's ok and I respect your personal view and decisions. However for others following this thread (this is directed at them, not as a retort to Duggan), I'll just put this out there.

Just an isolated example, but the handheld radio below weighs 9.5oz, is the size of a pack of cigs, and can...

...Transmit up to 5 watts on 2m / 70cm and low power on 1.25m.
...Receive AM/FM:0.500-999.998 MHz –– shortwave, ham, WX, AM/FM broadcast, aircraft, marine VHF, military, MARS/CAP, commercial bands, public safety bands, CB, FRS/GMRS, MURS, etc.
...be hooked up to any external antennas, from improved rubber duckies to a little magnet mount up to a full tower.
...be powered with any 7.4 volt DC source with the right cables, including Li-ion, AA's, car batteries, solar chargers...
...operate simplex (point to point), through repeaters, over VoIP via enabled repeaters, make free telephone calls using repeater autopatch, transmit/receive position, atmospheric data and text messages via APRS and Packet.
...be connected to any number of speaker or microphone sources
...be submersed in water
...be computer or manually programmed with 900 memory channels and 24 banks
...be used with pre-programmed special memories for shortwave broadcasts, marine VHF, and WX band –– without additional programming or knowledge of their freqs
...be purchased for $250 or less

This is just one example on the market, and there are updated models from Yaesu with expanded features as well as formidable competitors' offerings. I think I can sacrifice the 9.5oz in my pack for that kind of flexibility. Heck, most battery AM/FM radios or Countycomm SW receiver is in the same weight/size ballpark and this runs circles around them for capability.

Link Posted: 4/27/2011 10:00:10 AM EDT


Nice rig. Mine has the defensive upgrade applied.

Link Posted: 4/27/2011 10:12:05 AM EDT
I am a general class. My vote is for "useful but not absolutely necessary".  I don't actively participate in amateur radio except to practice.  

If you need to communicate with someone more than a couple of miles away Ham radio is probably the most reliable way to do it.  It is not infallable, there are various atmospheric conditions that make communications over longer ranges more art than science. It's not as easy as turning on the radio and talking to your Cousin in Paducah.  But maybe you can talk to a guy in Little Rock, who can then relay to Paducah through traffic nets.

I think ham could be a useful conduit of information if SHTF. Who wouldn't want to know what is going on, first hand, from residents in neighboring towns or States?  Commercial broadcasts may not be operating, and information divulged may be sterilized a bit.

The ham radio community does has a decent percentage of users that are into emergency communications, I volunteer for a faith based disaster relief agency. Amateur radio operators are still part of the their plan.   The Salvation Army still has an active amateur radio volunteers called the Satern Network. Cell towers do go down in natural disasters. Admittedly, as portable satellite systems have been getting better and cheaper, they have been replacing the bulk of the communications work done by amateurs.  The last storm I went on was Ike, and cell communication out to Galveston Isalnd was a no-go. The primary conduit  became radio for a few days following the storm.  

I would place amateur radio in the tertiary class of needs. There are higher priorities, including short range communication. But getting your tech license probably only takes ten hours of study. That would give you simplex ( radio to radio)  communication range of up to fifty miles or so. Beyond that is General, which is another 10-20 hours of study. To get geared up for that is probably 1K in equipment.   But that would give you virtually worldwide communication ability when conditions are favorable.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 10:24:26 AM EDT
A few weeks back here in Orlando we were hit with some good size and intense storms. Nothing like what has happened in NC or the Midwest but enough to knock out power, street signs and make traffic a mess.

My buddy and I had the day off and since we didn’t feel like working in a flooded garage we thought that grabbing some cigars and my bottle of bourbon would be a good alternative. A few minutes prior he had just seen my HAM radio sitting on the self, full of dust. We started to play with it and I explained how it worked and what was what.

Anyways, when we decided to leave we took the radio with us, the local HAM guys here in Orlando have a backup communications group that respond in case of wide outages and or power loss, emergencies etc. The whole time we drove we were getting live updates on traffic, storm location, police reports, accidents etc. we guided ourselves the whole way through E. Orlando avoiding all the traffic congestion, accidents and downed wires.

I laughed as this was the first time one of my more pricey, seemingly ridiculous preps became a golden ticket. I always knew that it was worth it just never had a chance to prove it until then. Made me smile
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 10:54:04 AM EDT
Yep, I also have the VX-6 and a couple of different antennas.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 11:58:44 AM EDT
Yes, I consider it necessary. I am working on catching up; just got into it.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 12:10:12 PM EDT
The decision that I, personally, have decided to take is a scanner that is able to pick up not only police, fire, ems, etc signals but most HAM as well. Personally I dont feel the need to transmit. Most information could be gleaned just by listning to the airwaves. When something goes down there will be plenty of people broadcasting or asking for info.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 12:32:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ex_dsmr:
The decision that I, personally, have decided to take is a scanner that is able to pick up not only police, fire, ems, etc signals but most HAM as well. Personally I dont feel the need to transmit. Most information could be gleaned just by listning to the airwaves. When something goes down there will be plenty of people broadcasting or asking for info.


im not sure you understand how a scanner works. it doesnt scan all the freq's in every band, it only scans the freq's you have programmed into it. some, if not most, do allow you to scan all the freq's in the bands but your talking 100's of thousands of freq's. so when your scanning one band someone on another band could be giving out important info, if you cant ask them to repeat what they said how is your scanner going to help you get that info?
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 3:26:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By BigDaddy0004:
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
snip... bunch of sweet pics.

Geek  

previously, you wrote,

It's an impedance matching transformer for random wire antennas. Banana jacks on the input (antenna) side and BNC on the output (radio) side.  The 2 OD things to the right of the Altoids tin are wire antenna reels. Each is filled with 50' of 26awg insulated stranded wire terminated in banana plugs.

what language is that?

ar-jedi


Both you guys need to stop..."geek" doesn't quite cut it for you two....don't you realize that the rest of us have gotten together to come up with a word that goes beyond geek.....
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 3:49:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2011 3:58:40 PM EDT by Bhart89]




Originally Posted By ar-jedi:



Originally Posted By BigDaddy0004:



Originally Posted By ar-jedi:

snip... bunch of sweet pics.


Geek



previously, you wrote,





It's an impedance matching transformer for random wire antennas. Banana jacks on the input (antenna) side and BNC on the output (radio) side. The 2 OD things to the right of the Altoids tin are wire antenna reels. Each is filled with 50' of 26awg insulated stranded wire terminated in banana plugs.


what language is that?



ar-jedi





I have a Yaesu VX-5r and an 897d.  I have solar panels and rechargable batteries so I can keep my comms up for a very long time.  I pray that I never have make the ham radio jump from hobby to necessity.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 3:50:52 PM EDT
Heck yeah I'd consider it a necessity-or, at least another implement to round out your overall preparedness plan.  Personally, I really felt the need to get on the stick with this and after studying for awhile, I finally got things up and running.  Felt like a big weight off my shoulders in terms of my emergency preparedness.

I've got my:
food
water
arms
generator/fuel
other implements

but this one, while some may view as an extravagance, was important to me and I'm glad I'm on the ball.

Get yourself a handy-talkie "HT" model, get your license, an antenna and some coax if you're really adventurous, and you're in business.  Heck with an HT, you can lash it to your go bag while you're heading out of the hot zone and can at least have an idea of what the situation is where you're leaving and where you're headed; be it tornadoes/hurricanes, zombies, or North Koreans.  

Just last week I fired up my HT to listen to the local storm spotters.  Very valuable information and was much more timely and immediate than the local weather man.

Now-I'll personally mostly listen on this thing but will contribute every once in a while.  Plus, like the other guys said, it's neat.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 4:11:14 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 4:29:28 PM EDT
I must get some of my gear hooked back up , remodeled my room and haven't hooked anything back up !

This is what it use to look like.



This is the same wall now.

Link Posted: 4/27/2011 5:13:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2011 5:20:12 PM EDT by Unique1]





Originally Posted By BigDaddy0004:





Originally Posted By Echo2:


if cells go kaput.....and power is gone.....this will be the way to transmit ans receive info....






+1  





http://home.comcast.net/~gregbell/New%20Station%20Overview.jpg


http://home.comcast.net/~gregbell/New%20Left%20Front%203%20Q.jpg
Wow. This would be my dream. But sadly I know less than nothing about HAM.





Do I think it's important? Right up there with ammo.



ETA. Saw the rest of the pics. Now reading the 101 Thread. WOW. I didn't know what I didn't know.
 
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 5:23:43 PM EDT
We just got rocked with bad storms and more are on the way.  Cell service is up, but after seeing that weather, I would say "hell yes" ham is essential, at the very least a UHF/VHF HT.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 6:57:46 PM EDT


Ham radio for communication should be way ahead of gen 3 night vision I think.



I did not do it that way, I procrastinate.



I am refilling preps and finishing the last of some projects I got started but never completed and reading up on ham stuff.



I figure within 30 days I should be figuring out where to schedule a test for my ham license.



Information is worth a lot.



I love my night vision but to some extent I should have considered that ham can let you see way farther than your eyeballs can see with night vision.



You need someone to communicate with but there are more than a few folks who use ham and as much as I value a cb, a ham radio is way beyond a common cb radio.



I am still one of those who thinks a cb might be useful, and they are cheap and no biggy to get your hands on.



But ham around here is a heck of a filter when it comes to eliminating some of the folks who clog the cb channels with stupidity and you want real info.



I would almost compare it to general discussion on this site being cb and this section of the site being ham, but that might not make my point clear enough.


Link Posted: 4/27/2011 7:42:12 PM EDT
This is a decent example: I got a call this evening from a disaster relief coordinator. Many parts of central Alabama  have been hit by tornados. Cell towers are down, or overworked to the point that calls are not getting through reliably.  They need ham communicators to help facilitate communication between cleanup teams, the command, and other NGOs.  It took me hours to  get in touch with two of my siblings to ensure they are OK. This  demonstrates the fragility of the conventional cell infrastructure.  Communications will be dicey for a day or two in some areas, and this is a relatively small, localized event.
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 7:59:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2011 8:03:08 PM EDT by Macumazahn]
Hams are an important part of preps.  They don't take the part of food/water/shelter, protection, but they come pretty high up next on the list.

Comms are very important as they provide early warning for disaster, info during disasters, coordination of rescue/rebuilding after disaster.   So maybe the isolated single guy who is self sufficient is not gonna need to talk to anyone else or know any current events or info, but for the most part, people would benefit from HAM communication.

Remember HAM radio can stand alone.  All ya need is a radio, battery, antenna and you are good.  Throw in a solar panel/charge controller and you can operate almost indefinitely.

Our state is fortunate to have most of the large hospitals on board for emergency contingency health care, such as when a hurricane comes in, cell towers are down and patients needs to be moved around state or triaged to a different hospital.   Any citizen that is trained and active with the local ham clubs can volunteer to take part.  Google SCHEARTS to check it out.

And yet, a gratuitous pic of my latest toy (uh, i mean tool)    


Check it out here  
linky
Link Posted: 4/27/2011 10:41:07 PM EDT
No, I ran out and got my General license (only studied for tech, but they encouraged me to go ahead and try for Gen and Extra, woulda gotten Extra if I had studied it, only missed by 2 questions).



I still have yet to operate a radio, and i've had my license for about 3 years.




My problem with ham is, that I have no one to talk to who would give a shit if I were in trouble.  Unless you have someone on the other end who will help, what good is it?
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 1:25:26 AM EDT
Originally Posted By jj01:
I've been considering getting involved in HAM radio operation, how important do you consider it as a prep?


I have been a licensed amateur radio operator for 6 years. Worked in emergency management, ARES, RACES, and a host of other acronyms. I consider it a flipping joke and an antique dinosaur that is staffed by even more dinosaur volunteers.

I realize things are slightly different outside of the Tulsa, OK metro area but my impression is not good. Most hams that I've interacted with would be the ones needing help WTSHTF not giving help.

Link Posted: 4/28/2011 4:00:56 AM EDT




Originally Posted By LOW2000:

No, I ran out and got my General license (only studied for tech, but they encouraged me to go ahead and try for Gen and Extra, woulda gotten Extra if I had studied it, only missed by 2 questions).





I still have yet to operate a radio, and i've had my license for about 3 years.






My problem with ham is, that I have no one to talk to who would give a shit if I were in trouble. Unless you have someone on the other end who will help, what good is it?




For me, HAM offers the opportunity to help keep me out of trouble in the first place.  99% of the time is spent just listening.  Think about it this way, say you are on your own and you can warn others that a hoarde of mutant zombie just left your AO.  the ability to share that info may prevent others from being eaten.
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 5:06:52 AM EDT
Originally Posted By KG5S:
I must get some of my gear hooked back up , remodeled my room and haven't hooked anything back up !

This is what it use to look like.

http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i195/KG5S/hamrad001-1.jpg

This is the same wall now.

http://i72.photobucket.com/albums/i195/KG5S/6021232_photobucket_33922_.jpg


from the 1966 Bat Cave to the 2011 Man Cave
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 5:12:55 AM EDT
Originally Posted By LOW2000:
No, I ran out and got my General license (only studied for tech, but they encouraged me to go ahead and try for Gen and Extra, woulda gotten Extra if I had studied it, only missed by 2 questions).

I still have yet to operate a radio, and i've had my license for about 3 years.

My problem with ham is, that I have no one to talk to who would give a shit if I were in trouble.  Unless you have someone on the other end who will help, what good is it?


Text in red explains why you have that "problem." If you operate a little (or even just monitor), you'll see that hams don't have to know each other. People on local repeaters often talk to friends as well as some 75m ragchew nets, however for the most part, hams are prepared to talk to hams period, whether strangers or not. And any operator knows to yield to emergency traffic and then do whatever they can to render aid (by relaying your communications as necessary) –– that concept has been tested on Technician exams since the dawn of time.

To borrow an analogy I once heard from ar-jedi, I think you've probably done the equivalent of buying the AR-15 and throwing it in the closet. Equipment/licensing gets you the tools, but you have to explore the service by operating if you want the skills that will actually help you.
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 5:40:39 AM EDT





Originally Posted By LOW2000:



No, I ran out and got my General license (only studied for tech, but they encouraged me to go ahead and try for Gen and Extra, woulda gotten Extra if I had studied it, only missed by 2 questions).






I still have yet to operate a radio, and i've had my license for about 3 years.







My problem with ham is, that I have no one to talk to who would give a shit if I were in trouble.  Unless you have someone on the other end who will help, what good is it?





I'm one of the guys in his thirties that got HAM for use when traditional infrastructure is down and information is direly needed. Thanks SF forum.




Been licensed for 18 mos (tech) and have had a blast talking with people on the many repeaters that are up and running in metro ATL. Not something I do every night or even on a weekly basis but I get out there when time permits. On the balance, HAMs in my area are very welcoming to their transmitters and helpful with questions. I've not had the occasion to, but if something were to happen and I needed help getting back to normal after a storm or something, I wouldn't think twice about putting a general CQ call out in request for assistance.





I want to know what other people see and hear as a complement to whatever information is available from traditional sources if civil disturbance or disruption in municipal government operation is seen etc. Would rather NOT wait for the politicians to admit to the extent of the issue before a plan to keep me & mine safe can be made. I'm confident that there will be a voice out on the air when most homes are dark in my AO and cell coverage is down. I know my station will be used to warn of danger as I see it happen.




I actually have a few neighbors that are my age, are preppers, and have FM stations of their own. Who would've known?


 
 
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 8:42:24 AM EDT
I consider it important for a couple of reasons. Should the SHTF and I am away from my wife and kids *I sometimes travel out of state for work) I want a way to be able to communicate with them, somehow, so that we can re-group. I don't trust that cellphone service will be available, especially considering what most of my family went through following Katrina (weeks without communicating with them, not knowing how they fared, had my nerves basically shot).

I have a friend (more like a Brother, really) who lives on the opposite coast. I want to be able to communicate with him should the SHTF. Me and mine showing up in Nevada and asking "so... anyone know Mitch and where I can find him?" isn't going to cut it and he and his showing up in Georgia asking if anyone knows Chuck will be just about as useful.

Outside of my immediate family (wife and kids) he and his wife are the only other people I'm really concerned about.

So some form of communication is, for me, necessary. I can't rely solely on cellphones so HAM seems like the best backup option.
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top