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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/30/2005 8:37:21 AM EDT
I bought a Kimber CDP II less that 6 months ago. Functions fine. But it has a long trigger pull than what im used to. What would you recommend

1 send it to kimber

2. can i do it, never don't trigger work BTW

3. should i get a local gunsmith to do it.... due to warrranty im kinda ify on this one.

4. this is still a new pistol. it might have 500-1k rounds throught it . still need some breakin time?


thanks for any help or suggestion you can give

Link Posted: 9/30/2005 10:15:35 AM EDT
Kimber won't do it for liability reasons. If you have nevere done one or been shown how to do one you will probably screw it up. Local gunsmith may or may not do a good job. It is doubtful that more shooting will make the trigger improve. Check the forums for 1911 specialists who will guarantee their work. Charles the Gunsmith.
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 10:28:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/30/2005 10:31:49 AM EDT by TWIRE]
I think you'll have to be more specific.

Anybody can drop in a short trigger. If you can't drop one in, you probably should NEVER disassemble any gun, ever.

If you are talking about the actual amount that the trigger moves in order to break the shot, that's a different ball game. But in reality, getting a different trigger pull weight or making simple adjustments just isn't that difficult.

So whatcha really talking about?
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 11:32:49 AM EDT
i had some guy at the range insult my Kimber because of the trigger pull. It is significantly longer than his Springfield. then he laughed at me when he found out what i payed for it

his trigger was shorter and crisper, than my Kimber. This is my only 1911, and the only 1911 i've shot. So i don't have much to compare to
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 11:54:23 AM EDT
Sounds like you met a gun prick. There are many of these, the scary part is they think they are EXPERTS. He probably paid for a trigger job or action tune and by doing so became a superior being. Figure out what you would like, what budget you have to spend and check references, etc. Take care. Charles.
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 1:10:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 2:06:59 PM EDT
Again, what exactly are you talking about? Are you talking about the distance from the mainspring housing to the front of the trigger. Or are you talking about the distance the trigger travels backward in order to release the hammer? Or are you talking about the 'stiffness' of the trigger pull? A lot of Springfields come with short trigger. You can sometimes lower the pull weight by getting areduced power mainspring. I'd like to know specifically what you are talking about.

And BTW the guy at the range was an arse. He was probably jealous of your gun.
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 3:12:18 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TWIRE:
Again, what exactly are you talking about? Are you talking about the distance from the mainspring housing to the front of the trigger. Or are you talking about the distance the trigger travels backward in order to release the hammer? Or are you talking about the 'stiffness' of the trigger pull? A lot of Springfields come with short trigger. You can sometimes lower the pull weight by getting areduced power mainspring. I'd like to know specifically what you are talking about.

And BTW the guy at the range was an arse. He was probably jealous of your gun.



he said it felt like a 6lbs trigger
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 3:50:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cruze5:

Originally Posted By TWIRE:
Again, what exactly are you talking about? Are you talking about the distance from the mainspring housing to the front of the trigger. Or are you talking about the distance the trigger travels backward in order to release the hammer? Or are you talking about the 'stiffness' of the trigger pull? A lot of Springfields come with short trigger. You can sometimes lower the pull weight by getting areduced power mainspring. I'd like to know specifically what you are talking about.

And BTW the guy at the range was an arse. He was probably jealous of your gun.



he said it felt like a 6lbs trigger



He's an arse. Whether it feels like 6lbs or not has nothing to do with the travel of the the trigger stirrup. The 6lbs. comment, if indeed you are talking about, the relative stiffness of the pull could be addressed by getting a reduced power hammer spring. Nothing drastic, just take it down a notch. And if you haven't disassembled the whole thing and given it a thorough cleaning and appropriate lube, that is also in order. You could very cheaply get a short trigger from Brownells. In fact, if you go into the Brownell's website, and click on the Guntech tab, go to the How-To articles, the second article is called 'The 2.5 lb. trigger. Admittedly, they do more to achieve that pull than most shoters are willing to invest in (time and money). But the article will give you an idea of what parts are involved. There's 6 or 7 part series there on building 1911s.

Good luck.

Link Posted: 10/1/2005 5:52:47 AM EDT
No offense, but what's the problem? You sound like you're worried about your trigger due to what someone else said. Who cares what that guy thinks? You shouldn't.

TWIRE asked a couple times what it was about your pull you didn't like. Let me go over a few things with you. There are several factors to the trigger pull. Here are some:

-Trigger pull weight: this is largely affected by the engagement angles and surfaces between the sear and hammer. The sear is the internal piece that holds the hammer back in the cocked position. In a trigger job, the engagement angles and surfaces are carefully cut and polished, and are responsible for the largest redusction in pull weight. Another factor is the amount of spring tension in the system. As already mentioned by TWIRE, there is the weight of the mainspring, and there is also the weight of the sear spring, specifically the sear and disconnector/trigger legs. Also, there is friction in the system to overcome, which is achieved by polishing parts like the trigger stirrup, the diconnector, the trigger track in the frame, etc.

-Trigger takeup: this is the initial distance the trigger travels before it engages the sear. There needs to be a certain amount for the disconnector to do it's job. Another term for this is slack, and yet another is pre-travel. Eliminating this is a function of limiting how far forward the trigger sits at rest (some triggers have a tab for this), and also some sears have a fitting pad. Most smiths don't even mess with this, as the distance is so minimal to begin with.

-Triger creep: after takeup is pulled, the trigger stirrup/disconnector engages the sear, and pulling the trigger further rearward will pull the sear away from the hammer, allowing the hammer to fall. The face of the sear can dag across the bottom of the hammer hooks to a degree whare it's felt. If you can feel it, it is described as creep. It feels like sponginess or noticeable grittiness. This is not to be confused with grittiness due to dirt and rough surfaces felt during takeup. Creep is the single worst thing to most users of 1911s regarding trigger pulls. The only way to get rid of it is to properly prep the sear and hammer, and to an extent the disconnector and sear spring.

-Trigger overtravel: after the sear breaks free of the hammer, the trigger will move rearward. This is known as overtravel or backlash. There again needs to be a certain amount for the sear to clear the hammer sufficiently. Most aftermarket triggers have a small screw in them to adjust out overtravel. This is where many screw up their trigger job. Adjust out too much, and the sear bumps the hammer's half cock notch. The sear gets battered from the constant hits on it's face. Eventually you end up with creep. Adjust out too much on a Colt with Series 80 parts, and you get light firing pin hits from the insufficent lift of the plunger in the slide. Worse yet, it can cause the firing pin and firing pin stop to fall out of the gun.

Anyway, that's a lot to throw at you, but basically, if you dry fire your gun, you will figure out what it is about trigger you like or dislike. If you have issue with any of the above items, by all means have a professional trigger job done. If you have not noticed any problems, and are just worried because some a**hat told you there was something wrong with your gun, don't sweat it.
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 11:11:16 AM EDT
thanks for the input everyone,

I've gone to a couple gun shops since. held a couple other Kimbers. A new raptor too i might add. The triggers are for the most part the same. He just wanted to tick me off, cause im less than half his age and have a better pistol than him
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