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Posted: 6/20/2010 6:53:37 AM EST
The last thread was locked for dumbassery, please mind your peas and cues to avoid giving the beer slayer any heartburn.


Link Posted: 6/20/2010 6:54:55 AM EST
FUCKING IN ON ONE!!!!

(my first You aint seen bad thread)
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 6:55:32 AM EST
http://mises.org/daily/4511

Henry Hazlitt article.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 6:57:31 AM EST
Is it time for this again?


How many of these we gotta have before we see some of the BAD?
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 6:57:45 AM EST

Originally Posted By DesuDurDesu:
http://mises.org/daily/4511

Henry Hazlitt article.

I usually just skim most of the articles posted in these threads but after a short skim I'm going to read this one.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 6:59:59 AM EST
Originally Posted By Justin-Kase:
The last thread was locked for dumbassery, please mind your peas and cues to avoid giving the beer slayer any heartburn.




Shame it wasn't the right "dumbass" that got locked

Either way, let's keep the anti-awesome going, as we usually have a fair amount of wonderful(ly depressing) info here, and we could do with more of the same and less jack-assery this time around.


Oh, and in on one!
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:02:32 AM EST
Originally Posted By Justin-Kase:
The last thread was locked for dumbassery, please mind your peas and cues to avoid giving the beer slayer any heartburn.




In on Page 1. The other thread would have died anyway as it was within 5 posts of reaching the 100th page.

Anyway, here is something to consider:
Russian president wants New World Order (and some socialism too)
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:02:52 AM EST
California is taking a seismic drubbing

The whole enchilada could let loose before this thread is over.

People are FLEEING California. Fact.



and every day we inch ever closer to 2012...


Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:04:14 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:04:49 AM EST
This thread is definitely getting another tag.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:08:19 AM EST
Hmm. Your ideas are intriguing to me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.

Again
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:08:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/20/2010 7:10:16 AM EST by Dru]
Originally Posted By Merrell:
California is taking a seismic drubbing

The whole enchilada could let loose before this thread is over.

People are FLEEING California. Fact.

http://blog.american.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/streeter-61810-c.gif

and every day we inch ever closer to 2012...




I read something the other day (can't find the link now) that the mayans did the math wrong (or something like that) on 2012....

They said 2012...... it should have been 2010

Now we've got Oilmageddon in the gulf.....


Anyhoo... not to stray off course.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:09:00 AM EST
Originally Posted By Spikes08:
Is it time for this again?


How many of these we gotta have before we see some of the BAD?



I strongly recommend that you go back and read the previous threads - the "bad" is happening right now for a whole lot of people and is only getting worse. Rome didn't descend into anarchy in a few months or years and neither will we. "Collapse" doesn't necessarily mean "Mad Max wandering the Outback" as many seem to think. The money HAS to run out at some point - ignoring the data doesn't make it go away...

Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:09:46 AM EST
in on 1 of 6. pretty sure bad is here.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:12:34 AM EST
I think the oil gusher in the gulf might be a game-changer.



And not a good one.

Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:21:06 AM EST
Interesting. Part six started on the worst note ever, exactly one year to the day part one was created.


Tips: If they piss you off, ignore them. If they are acting like a troll, ignore them.


I'd like to add this one from the last thread. A precursor to what we can expect for the next two years as nothing much gets done.
Obama says GOP making life harder for the jobless



Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:26:30 AM EST
tag
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:26:42 AM EST
In.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:28:07 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:28:22 AM EST

Originally Posted By rippersde50:
Interesting. Part six started on the worst note ever, exactly one year to the day part one was created.


Wow. Talk about an omen.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:29:41 AM EST
In typical ARFCOM fashion, in on 1, in before Dave_A and in before sherrick13.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:30:34 AM EST
In on 1
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:32:05 AM EST
oh what the hell.....














N
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:33:14 AM EST
Bad things happening on page 1...
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:33:56 AM EST
In on one of the "Debbie Downer" thread.

Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:34:37 AM EST
Good work, Justin-Kase.



"...A contractionary implosion has been set in motion that, simply put, possesses the power to fiscally wreck our nation, and destroy the current world economic order."




Me, 1/26/09

In.


Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:35:26 AM EST
tag
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:35:51 AM EST
Originally Posted By CletusRoundbelly:
I think the oil gusher in the gulf might be a game-changer.



And not a good one.



Most certainly so
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:36:27 AM EST
I'm In
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:37:34 AM EST
I'll get in on this one.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:39:21 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/20/2010 7:42:24 AM EST by BangStick1]
Thread #6

The sky is still falling, isn't it? How long is it gonna take to get here?

The suspense is killing me! I have to get it on!




Bangstick to the economy

Shit or get off the pot!





Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:39:35 AM EST
Let's try to stay on-topic this time.

Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:42:45 AM EST
Originally Posted By DesuDurDesu:
http://mises.org/daily/4511

Henry Hazlitt article.


"it would be difficult to think of a more serious threat to world stability and full production than the continual prospect of a uniform world inflation to which the politicians of every country would be so easily tempted."


While he got to write about, we get to live through it.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:43:46 AM EST
Originally Posted By mongo001:
In typical ARFCOM fashion, in on 1, in before...<snip>


Rich V, you were right; all my dealings with trolls were left in part 5:



From henceforth in the YASBY series, and I encourage all to join with Rich and others who have long advocated it,

I SHUN ALL TROLLS.


Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:44:38 AM EST
Originally Posted By Fist-of-Freedom:
Good work, Justin-Kase.



"...A contractionary implosion has been set in motion that, simply put, possesses the power to fiscally wreck our nation, and destroy the current world economic order."


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/22/EtruscanM-01.svg/500px-EtruscanM-01.svg.png

Me, 1/26/09

In.




World War III is coming...
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:44:57 AM EST

Originally Posted By Fist-of-Freedom:
Originally Posted By mongo001:
In typical ARFCOM fashion, in on 1, in before...<snip>


Rich V, you were right; all my dealings with trolls were left in part 5:



From henceforth in the YASBY series, and I encourage all to join with Rich and others who have long advocated it,

I SHUN ALL TROLLS.


Agree. Don't even quote them.

Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:45:48 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/20/2010 7:46:38 AM EST by Atomic_Ferret]
In, with an interesting observation.

Was at the grocery store yesterday to pick up a few things and noticed something odd. The store seemed really down on inventory, to the point where they had white cardboard boxes taking up the back 1/3 to 1/2 of each shelf. The boxes were empty, not cased stock (I checked).

Dunno if they have decided to cut down on inventory to keep waste to a minimum, the store has trouble paying it's bills or what. But this is a major chain. Never seen it before and don't quite know what to make of it, just relaying what I saw.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:47:08 AM EST
in on page 1!

Shitty economy, Mexican drug lord invasion, Oil Spill, and a dumb ass in the white house
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:48:11 AM EST
Researchers Identify Male Menopause Symptoms

Decreased Sex Drive and Fatigue Are Among Symptoms of Late-Onset Hypogonadism
By Katrina Woznicki
WebMD Health NewsReviewed by Laura J. Martin, MDJune 17, 2010 –– European researchers have identified physical and psychological symptoms that along with a decreased testosterone level can help diagnose “male menopause.”

Male menopause, known clinically as late-onset hypogonadism, refers to a drop in testosterone levels, which sometimes occurs as men age. Although all women experience menopause (a significant decline of estrogen) as they age, only a small number of aging men have male menopause. The study appears in the June 17 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

In this study, researchers from the Development and Regenerative Biomedicine Research Group at the University of Manchester in England suggest that about 2% of elderly men enrolled in the European Male Aging Study may have male menopause. The UK team based their findings on a random sampling of men participating in the European Male Aging Study. Their sampling included 3,369 men between the ages 40 and 79 who came from eight European centers.

Study researcher Frederick C. W. Wu, MD, and his colleagues surveyed the men about their physical, sexual, and psychological health. Morning blood samples were collected to assess testosterone levels. Men with pituitary or testicular diseases were excluded from the study.

Wu and colleagues identified three key symptoms related to sexual health that were associated with a decreased testosterone level and contributing to a male menopause diagnosis –– erectile dysfunction, reduced sex drive, and decreased frequency of morning erection. Six non-sexual symptoms were also identified as possibly contributing to a male menopause diagnosis. The three physical symptoms were: difficulty in engaging in vigorous physical activity, inability to walk one kilometer, and inability to bend or stoop. The three psychological symptoms were: low energy, feeling sad, and fatigue. However, the researchers noted the physical and psychological symptoms were not as strongly associated to low testosterone levels as the three sexual symptoms.

Overall, 2.1% of study group participants had testosterone levels and at least three sexual symptoms associated with criteria for late-onset hypogonadism. Researchers reported the prevalence of hypogonadism would likely increase with age; from 0.1% for men aged 40 to 49 to 0.6% for men aged 50 to 59, to 3.2% for men aged 60 to 69, and to 5.1% for men aged 70 to 79. The study also showed that men who had male menopause were more likely to have other health problems, such as being obese.

The findings, Wu said, could help doctors identify who is at risk for male menopause and who could benefit from testosterone-replacement therapy.

"The diagnosis of classical hypogonadism is corroborated by underlying diseases affecting the testes or pituitary gland, which controls testicular function, but this well-practiced diagnostic approach is frequently found wanting when dealing with the age-related decline of testosterone in elderly men who are prone to have a significant background of non-hormone-related complaints," Wu said. "Our findings have for the first time identified the key symptoms of late-onset hypogonadism and suggest that testosterone treatment may only be useful in a relatively small number of cases where androgen deficiency is suspected, since many candidate symptoms of classic hypogonadism were not associated with decreased testosterone levels in older men."

Wu and his team noted that the differences in testosterone levels between men with symptoms and men without “were marginal, highlighting the weak overall association between symptoms and testosterone levels.” Researchers also pointed out that their data collection about the patients’ symptoms were based on the patients’ recall, so there could be a potential bias.

Wu said there is a risk of overdiagnosing male menopause, a condition some critics say is just a part of the natural aging process and not a medical condition at all. It is estimated that hormone therapy has increased by 400% in the United States since 1999, though this spike in treatment has not been observed in other countries.

"The application of these new criteria should guard against the excessive diagnosis of hypogonadism and curb the unwise use of testosterone therapy in older men,” Wu said.

A U.S. study published last month in the International Journal of Clinical Practice reported a high prevalence of hypogonadism among older men and projected that this figure would increase given the fact that men are living longer into old age. The article also reported an association between male menopause and other chronic health problems, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, osteoporosis, and metabolic syndrome, an endocrine disorder that can increase the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

Christopher Saigal MD, MPH, an associate professor of urology at the University of California, Los Angeles, said one of the strengths of the study is that it is a general population study that is not focused on men seeking care for urology problems, such as erectile dysfunction.

“Many of the complaints ascribed to having 'low testosterone' seem as likely to be found in men with normal testosterone,” Saigal tells WebMD via email. “The authors found that some sexual symptoms and a lower self-reported vitality were consistently associated with low testosterone levels.”

Saigal said that it’s known that circulating testosterone decreases by about 1% per year in men after age 30, but whether this decline causes risks to one’s health or whether testosterone therapy would be beneficial or induce risk remains unknown.

“We still don't know how effective supplementation will be at ameliorating these, or the long-term risks of the medication, but we now have an evidence-based definition of men who might be helped,” Saigal said. “They must have specific symptoms as well as properly collected blood tests.”

"This article raises more questions than it answers," says Natan Bar-Chama, MD, associate professor of urology and associate professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive science at The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City.

"It is essentially a statistical exercise with, in my opinion, limited clinical implications … Firstly, clear guidelines by the endocrine society exist and have been recently updated to diagnose hypogonadism (total testosterone of <300 ng /dl),” Bar-Chama says. “Is the linkage between fewer morning erections, fewer sexual thoughts –– reflecting a reduced sex drive –– and impotence with hypogonadism newsworthy? We have known this since testosterone was discovered. Furthermore one may draw the incorrect conclusion, which is that by treating hypogonadism one would effectively cure erectile dysfunction.”



Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:48:46 AM EST
I'm in for more Chicken Little.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:49:20 AM EST

Originally Posted By Atomic_Ferret:
In, with an interesting observation.

Was at the grocery store yesterday to pick up a few things and noticed something odd. The store seemed really down on inventory, to the point where they had white cardboard boxes taking up the back 1/3 to 1/2 of each shelf.

Dunno if they have decided to cut down on inventory to keep waste to a minimum, the store has trouble paying it's bills or what. But this is a major chain. Never seen it before and don't quite know what to make of it, just relaying what I saw.
Walmart has really cut back on their selection and has instead added much to their own label line. Seriously though, Glad sandwich bags run about $2.50/box, the Walmart label is about a buck cheaper.

Interesting though, is how micro-brews and specialty beers continue to get good fanfare when the typical American light beer is half the cost. Every now and then I'll go cheap and buy a 12pack of Bud Light, but I still shell out $8/six pack.

Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:53:39 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/20/2010 8:17:02 AM EST by jeffers_mz]
I tried to stay on topic last time.

Sherrick came in and created as much havoc as he could while staying just under the level of CoC violation.

In case it's too difficult for site staff to search, Sherrick attempted to start the last iteration of this thread, a thread he disagrees with, and was successful until he was overruled by majority opinion. If that isn't BLATANT trolling, then there is no such thing as trolling.

Does majority opinion count here anymore, or is the agenda ruling site moderation confident that the party line can be imposed and any member dissent ignored?

I called his bullshit when I saw it, to the point of possibly crossing lines myself.

Someone figured I was going to cross a line eventually, and they were right.

That someone, I still do not know who it is, bought me a membership, so I could ignore the obvious troll, but that worked only long enough for the troll to change his tactics.

For the past two weeks, it has been impossible to access the subject matter of this thread due to Sherrick's persistent and obvious trolling of this thread, to the point that entire off-topic PAGES are dedicated to quotes of his bullshit.

Now he has managed to get the most productive poster of this information in the entire thread locked and silenced and I have had all I intend to take.

I will NOT have my news censored, which is what this amounts to, and I will NOT pretend I see anything other than precisely this going on.

If this website cannot...or WILL not recognize obvious trolling, and DEAL with it at least as severely as those whom Sherrick provoes, I have no further use for this webste.

Mods and site staff, take your pick.

Enforce the rules consistently and fairly, or move ahead as a partisan, politically active support structure for those who are actively destroying this country, AND BE RECOGNIZED HERE AND ELSEWHERE AS SUCH.









Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:54:39 AM EST
What concerns me is that gas is cheap, and this heading into the peak of vacation season.

That means people aren't using much gas, and that means not only the tourism insdustry is suffering, but nobody has any bucks to do even short vacations.

Couple that with the commercial real estate collapse looming in 2011, (and am guessing that will be after a lackluster Holiday sales season) and the blig slide could start in earnest.

Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:58:59 AM EST
In on 1. I still think we're going down the toilet.
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 7:59:24 AM EST
Originally Posted By Merrell:
What concerns me is that gas is cheap, and this heading into the peak of vacation season.

That means people aren't using much gas, and that means not only the tourism insdustry is suffering, but nobody has any bucks to do even short vacations.

Couple that with the commercial real estate collapse looming in 2011, (and am guessing that will be after a lackluster Holiday sales season) and the blig slide could start in earnest.




Unemployed people don't use a whole lot of gas - either for work or for vacations...

Link Posted: 6/20/2010 8:00:44 AM EST
http://www.financialarmageddon.com/2010/06/what-are-they-thinking.html

In honor of the fact that household ownership of municipal bonds –– a $2.8 trillion market –– now exceeds $1 trillion for the first time ever, indicating that Americans are extremely comfortable with the credit exposure they have to state and local governments, I bring you the following report from Toronto's Globe and Mail, "California On 'Verge of System Failure,’" which makes you wonder just what those investors –– gamblers? –– are thinking:

Golden State, like many others, is nearly bankrupt and desperately needs a bailout

Arnella Sims has seen a lot in her 34 years as a Los Angeles County court reporter, but nothing like this.

Case files piling up by the thousands, phones ringing off the hook, forced midweek courthouse closings and occasional brawls as frustrated citizens queue for hours to pay parking fines.

“People think we’re becoming a Third World country,” said Ms. Sims, 55. “They don’t understand.”

It’s a story that’s being repeated all across California – and throughout the United States – as cash-strapped state and local governments grapple with collapsed tax revenues and swelling budget gaps. Mass layoffs, slashed health and welfare services, closed parks, crumbling superhighways and ever-larger public school class sizes are all part of the new normal.

California’s fiscal hole is now so large that the state would have to liberate 168,000 prison inmates and permanently shutter 240 university and community college campuses to balance its budget in the fiscal year that begins July 1.

Think of California as Greece on the Pacific: bankrupt and desperately needing a bailout.

“We are on the verge of system failure,” warned Jean Ross, executive director of the California Budget Project, an independent think tank based in Sacramento.

None of this would matter much to anyone outside the not-so-Golden State except that California’s budget crisis is a harbinger of a grim dilemma that all Americans will soon confront. The country has built an elaborate and costly government machine, tied to a regressive tax system that can’t generate enough revenue to pay for it all.

Canadians too have a stake in all this. Dramatic cuts by state governments are threatening to derail the U.S. recovery, dampening expectations for global growth.

“This is a classic American dilemma,” explained Peter Dreier, a professor of politics and director of urban and environmental policy at Occidental College in Los Angeles. “Americans expect a lot of their government. But politicians have convinced them they’re not getting what they want.”

Americans have been “brainwashed” into believing they pay a lot of taxes, Prof. Dreier added. In fact, they are among the least-taxed people in the Western World, particularly if they’re wealthy, he said.

After unveiling a grim budget last month that scraps a popular welfare program for a million children and slashes countless other programs for the poor and elderly, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger complained that the state’s broken budget process has left him facing a “Sophie’s Choice.” That’s a reference to the story of the Polish Jew forced by the Nazis to choose between saving her son or her daughter from the Auschwitz gas chambers.

Experts say the U.S. government will inevitably have to come to the rescue, using its borrowing clout to save the state from near-bankruptcy or devastating service cuts. Do nothing, and the entire U.S. economy could be put at risk. California, like the country’s banks, may be too big to fail.

California is looking at a gap of $19-billion (U.S.) this year and $37-billion next year on a roughly $125-billion-a-year budget. Local governments, including the City of Los Angeles, are in similarly dire financial straits and are now scrambling to shed workers and services.

“We have to get some federal money,” argued Ms. Ross of the California Budget Project. “The impact [of the Schwarzenegger budget] would be enough to slow down the U.S. economy. It would be bad for the U.S. and, arguably, bad for the world to do the shock therapy approach.”

And California isn’t alone in angling for a bailout. U.S. states are facing shortfalls totalling nearly $300-billion in 2010 and 2011; they also must wrestle with hundreds of billions more in unfunded pension obligations to their workers. “There are a few Greek crises brewing among the United States of America,” said economist Ed Yardeni of Yardeni Research Inc.

The task is made all the more difficult because California and virtually all other states are barred by legislation from running operating deficits, forcing them to balance their budgets annually by slashing spending, raising taxes or both. Typically, states can only borrow short-term funds, or for capital projects.

Billionaire Warren Buffett, who advised U.S. President Barack Obama during his White House run, suggested recently that a Washington bailout of California and other troubled states is inevitable. How, he wondered, can Washington deny California after saying yes to General Motors, AIG and dozens of banks.

“I don’t know how you would tell a state you’re going to stiff-arm them with all the bailouts of corporations,” Mr. Buffett said.

The alternative for many state and local governments may be default. Mr. Buffett said many state and municipal bonds are only triple-A rated because investors assume there’s a federal backstop. “If the federal government won’t step in to help them, who knows what [the bonds] are,” he said.

Link Posted: 6/20/2010 8:00:53 AM EST
Bring out the dead , I'm in before the LOCK.... WTF OVER
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 8:01:18 AM EST
one
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 8:03:23 AM EST
Page 1!!!!

btw the cali thing is the dems just stuffing the ballots with people in the rest of the country
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 8:04:07 AM EST
IN!
Link Posted: 6/20/2010 8:05:33 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/20/2010 8:07:11 AM EST by AC_Doctor]
[AC_Doctor] Get ready for $8-$9 dollar a gallon gasoline
welcome to the second DEPRESSION
[/AC_Doctor]

US, Israel Warships in Suez May Be Prelude to Faceoff with Iran

http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/138164

by Tzvi Ben Gedalyahu


Egypt allowed at least one Israeli and 11 American warships to pass through the Suez Canal as an Iranian flotilla approaches Gaza. Egypt closed the canal to protect the ships with thousands of soldiers, according to the British-based Arabic language newspaper Al Quds al-Arabi.

One day prior to the report on Saturday, Voice of Israel government radio reported that the Egyptian government denied an Israeli request not to allow the Iranian flotilla to use the Suez Canal to reach Gaza, in violation of the Israeli sea embargo on the Hamas-controlled area.

International agreements require Egypt to keep the Suez open even for warships, but the armada, led by the USS Truman with 5,000 sailors and marines, was the largest in years. Egypt closed the canal to fishing and other boats as the armada moved through the strategic passageway that connects the Red and Mediterranean Seas.

Despite Egypt’s reported refusal to block the canal to Iranian boats, the clearance for the American-Israeli fleet may be a warning to Iran it may face military opposition if the Iranian Red Crescent ship continues on course to Gaza.

The warships may exercise the right to inspect the Iranian boat for the illegal transport or weapons. Newsweek reported that Egyptian authorities could stop the ship for weeks, using technicalities such as requiring that any official documents be translated from Farsi into Arabic.

The magazine’s website also reported that the Iranian navy is the weakest part of its armed forces. Tehran has already backed down from announced intentions to escort the Iranian ships with "volunteer marines” from the Iranian Revolutionary Guards.

The Iranian news site Hamsayeh.net reported, “The move might be in connection to U.S. self-inflicted embargo against Iran aimed at inspecting Iran bound ships for suspected goods related to the country’s nuclear program.”

Another battle on the high seas may involve one, and possibly two, Lebanese vessels that are aimed at challenging Israel’s sovereignty over the Gaza coastal waters. Hizbullah, gearing up for a reaction to a possible clash between the Israeli Navy (pictured) and the Lebanese boats, has delayed rocket units near Lebanese ports, according to unofficial military sources.

Israel has warned U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon that Israel will use force, if necessary, to stop the boats, one of which is carrying approximately 70 women passengers and crew organized by Hizbullah support Samar al-Hajj. Her husband is one of several jailed suspects involved in the assassination for former Lebanese anti-Syrian Prime Rafik Hariri.

Hizbullah has denied it is connected with the Lebanese flotilla, but it has been reported that Al Hajj met with Hizbullah leader Hassan Nasrallah last month. (IsraelNationalNews.com)
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