Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 4
Posted: 7/21/2013 5:10:52 PM EST
So you are flying through space in your starfighter and are attacked by another spaceship with a skittle cannon. You are forced to make violent maneuvers to avoid the sugary bringers of death. Would you be subject to "g" type forces while doing so in a zero gravity environment? I am thinking centrifugal firce would maybe impart a g-type loading to the pilot's body. Thoughts?
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:11:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/21/2013 5:18:38 PM EST by Undefined]
No.

Never ask a man who has had a couple of drinks if he has any thoughts about inertial forces in a zero g environment.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:12:02 PM EST
Do astronauts masturbate in space?
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:12:28 PM EST
I have no idea, therefore I'm going to say yes and in before Keith J or someone smarter than me
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:12:57 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Undefined:
No.
View Quote


Actually...yes.

Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:13:21 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Undefined:
No.
View Quote

Wrong.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:13:50 PM EST
Yes.

Inertia is a bitch regardless of gravity.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:13:55 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cpt_Kirks:


Actually...yes.

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cpt_Kirks:
Originally Posted By Undefined:
No.


Actually...yes.



The OP's question was "Thoughts?". I answered honestly.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:14:06 PM EST
I'll say yes.

Inertia and centrifugal forces still hold true in zero gravity.

Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:14:30 PM EST
Yes.

Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:14:55 PM EST
Things in motion tend to stay in motion...
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:15:02 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/21/2013 5:15:14 PM EST by 2AFAN]
Is a treadmill involved. . . ?
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:15:15 PM EST
Only when he activates Death Blossom.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:16:19 PM EST
Physics...

Arfcom aint got time for no physics...
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:16:23 PM EST
Yes, G's come from acceleration/deceleration. Whether the source is gravity or thrust is irrelevant.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:16:46 PM EST
Yes. Any change in vector requires acceleration. Acceleration means pulling Gs.

However, there is no aerodynamic turning in space. It won't be wings, it'll be thrust vectoring that does the work.


Visual range combat between two small vessels in space will NOT happen unless both ships run out of all kinds of ammo
and have to resort to throwing the contents of their tool kits at each other.

Thus, there will be no dogfighting. Nor would such maneuvering resemble aerial dogfighting in any way. Without aerodynamic
lift and drag, no way, no chance, no how.

Spacecraft do not maneuver like aircraft.

Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:16:47 PM EST
Does the pilot have mass? Or is he just a figment of your imagination? (Like your Star Fighter)
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:17:02 PM EST
Yes. Pulling g's isn't from gravity (except for, on earth, the first one), it's from acceleration.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:17:10 PM EST
You'll feel 1G accelerating at 9.8 m/s^2 whether gravity is present or not.

Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:17:13 PM EST
Yes, g-force is just an object's acceleration normalized to earth's gravitation acceleration constant. It isn't dependent on gravity being present.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:17:13 PM EST
Originally Posted By Powerkicker:
So you are flying through space in your starfighter and are attacked by another spaceship with a skittle cannon. You are forced to make violent maneuvers to avoid the sugary bringers of death. Would you be subject to "g" type forces while doing so in a zero gravity environment? I am thinking centrifugal firce would maybe impart a g-type loading to the pilot's body. Thoughts?
View Quote


Of course. "G" or gravity is only one vector of acceleration. Acceleration happens whenever we change velocity as well, like when we hit the accelerator on our car and are pushed back into our seats or take a turn at a good speed. These physics are universal.

Wear your seatbelt! Not just on thee road but in space as well. In fact, you are typically moving at much higher speeds in space such that any sudden change in direction will make you loose your lunch and smash your head into a bulkead.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:17:50 PM EST
Yes. Battlestar Galactica explained this.

Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:18:08 PM EST
Of course. How does one experience g-forces greater than one in the first place. Those forces are due to acceleration. As your space craft accelerates in a new direction, your body and the parts of the space craft undergo g-forces. Force is just mass times acceleration (F = mA).
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:18:57 PM EST
Originally Posted By Powerkicker:
So you are flying through space in your starfighter and are attacked by another spaceship with a skittle cannon. You are forced to make violent maneuvers to avoid the sugary bringers of death. Would you be subject to "g" type forces while doing so in a zero gravity environment? I am thinking centrifugal firce would maybe impart a g-type loading to the pilot's body. Thoughts?
View Quote


Do you think the higher "G" forces felt by fighter pilots and astronauts have anything to do with gravity? Nope, "G's" are just a very handy unit of measure.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:19:18 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Smitro:
Do astronauts masturbate in space?
View Quote


Some probably take advantage of that vacuum tube which is supposed to be for waste disposal...
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:19:30 PM EST
Only if they have mass.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:19:41 PM EST
Yes. But Space Dogfights? Laff.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:19:57 PM EST
Yes.

There is one G acting on you at all times on earth. You can modify the direction you feel the most G's, but that one positive G is always there, always acting on you. So that means all the G's you feel in maneuvers are pretty much independent of the Earths gravity.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:20:26 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By happycynic:
Yes. Battlestar Galactica explained this.

View Quote
But first Babylon 5 had to explain it to them so they could get it right the 2nd time.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:21:00 PM EST
yes.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:21:02 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Yes. Any change in vector requires acceleration. Acceleration means pulling Gs.

However, there is no aerodynamic turning in space. It won't be wings, it'll be thrust vectoring that does the work.


Visual range combat between two small vessels in space will NOT happen unless both ships run out of all kinds of ammo
and have to resort to throwing the contents of their tool kits at each other.

Thus, there will be no dogfighting. Nor would such maneuvering resemble aerial dogfighting in any way. Without aerodynamic
lift and drag, no way, no chance, no how.

Spacecraft do not maneuver like aircraft.

View Quote


There isn't anything special about space that would negate dogfighting. Now dogfighting is pretty much a thing of the past due to better weapons, but you COULD do it in space.

Completely non-scientific demonstration: go play freespace 2.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:22:09 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By crushtheturtle:
I'll say yes.

Inertia and centrifugal forces still hold true in zero gravity.

View Quote


No such thing as centrifugal forces.

Thrusters on the right that move the spacecraft to the left, will cause the astronaut to be pushed against the right wall. Just like thrusting from below will increase g forces and make the astronaut feel he/she is heavier.

Other comments about it not being like aircraft are right on.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:22:44 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/21/2013 5:25:11 PM EST by Diesel_Maximus_2992]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Undefined:
No.
View Quote
actually yes. because you are no longer dealing with weight per say but mass and inertia. inertia still works in a zero gravity environment because it is an object in motion. the key component in this is mass, not weight. The "forces" acting upon your body would be the container you are in (i.e.) the spacecraft. it will be the thing forcing you to change your direction either by a chair and restraints. or bouncing off of a bulkhead if you are not strapped down, because weight momentum works directly off of mass and not off of weight. weight is just an extra component of force that needs to be calculated in a gravitational environment in F=ma.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:23:26 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:23:32 PM EST
Absolutely.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:24:11 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Yes. Any change in vector requires acceleration. Acceleration means pulling Gs.

However, there is no aerodynamic turning in space. It won't be wings, it'll be thrust vectoring that does the work.


Visual range combat between two small vessels in space will NOT happen unless both ships run out of all kinds of ammo
and have to resort to throwing the contents of their tool kits at each other.

Thus, there will be no dogfighting. Nor would such maneuvering resemble aerial dogfighting in any way. Without aerodynamic
lift and drag, no way, no chance, no how.

Spacecraft do not maneuver like aircraft.

View Quote
should have kept reading. well said sir.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:24:38 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:
Yes.

Inertia is a bitch regardless of gravity.
View Quote



This.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:25:56 PM EST
Yes
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:26:22 PM EST
blah blah blah blah....

F=ma
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:27:31 PM EST
Really?

Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:27:34 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By drrocket:


No such thing as centrifugal forces.

Thrusters on the right that move the spacecraft to the left, will cause the astronaut to be pushed against the right wall. Just like thrusting from below will increase g forces and make the astronaut feel he/she is heavier.

Other comments about it not being like aircraft are right on.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By drrocket:
Originally Posted By crushtheturtle:
I'll say yes.

Inertia and centrifugal forces still hold true in zero gravity.



No such thing as centrifugal forces.

Thrusters on the right that move the spacecraft to the left, will cause the astronaut to be pushed against the right wall. Just like thrusting from below will increase g forces and make the astronaut feel he/she is heavier.

Other comments about it not being like aircraft are right on.



Centrifugal, centripetal

I knew I'd pick the wrong one

Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:27:58 PM EST
is the ship on a tread mill?
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:28:26 PM EST
Spacecraft rely on inertia to keep moving forward in space. Otherwise they would need shit tons of fuel to et anywhere.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:29:19 PM EST
Absolutely, yes. But it doesn’t work like it does in an airplane.

If a gravitational field causes you to move then you don’t feel any acceleration. That’s because the gravity is acting on every particle in your body equally and acting on every part of the spaceship equally. (there is an exception near a black hole, but that’s not important right now)

When you turn in an airplane what is happening is that the airplane points its nose in another direction. The air then pushes on the wings causing the airplane to change course. The airplane then pushes on you to make you change course along with the airplane. You, of course feel this and it’s what pilots feel when they experience g forces in a turn.

OK, now say you are in your space fighter and notice a missile closing on you. You turn your nose in a different direction, and nothing happens. That’s because there’s no air acting on wings to force the fighter to turn. Oh, you feel the turning, but assuming you are at the center of the fighter, you just felt yourself turn and that’s it.

So you trigger your under jets that you normally use for landing and get pushed straight down in your seat at 2G (or whatever you had the under jets set at.) When you cut them off you feel nothing again. Then you fire your main engine and feel yourself get pushed back in the seat. As long as that main engine is running you will feel like you are laying on your back.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:30:04 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:
Yes.

Inertia is a bitch regardless of gravity.
View Quote


Came here to post this.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:31:04 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By wingsnthings:
Does the pilot have mass? Or is he just a figment of your imagination? (Like your Star Fighter)
View Quote



Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:31:44 PM EST
Yes because magnets
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:35:50 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/21/2013 5:36:11 PM EST by Admiral_Crunch]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SPECTRE:
Only when he activates Death Blossom.
View Quote

But it's never been tested. It might overload the systems -- blow up the ship.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:38:02 PM EST
Originally Posted By Powerkicker:
So you are flying through space in your starfighter and are attacked by another spaceship with a skittle cannon. You are forced to make violent maneuvers to avoid the sugary bringers of death. Would you be subject to "g" type forces while doing so in a zero gravity environment? I am thinking centrifugal firce would maybe impart a g-type loading to the pilot's body. Thoughts?
View Quote
Haven't you ever heard about how a real light speed capable craft would liquify anybody that tried to use it unless it accelerated verrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrry slowly?
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:43:51 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By fervid_dryfire:


Came here to post this.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By fervid_dryfire:
Originally Posted By GeorgiaBII:
Yes.

Inertia is a bitch regardless of gravity.


Came here to post this.

Yep.

Of course if it'son a treadmill, the laws of physics apply differently.............on Wednesdays.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 5:44:37 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Smitro:
Do astronauts masturbate in space?
View Quote

Of course wre do.
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 4
Top Top