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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 10/27/2004 2:15:31 PM EST
Gas heater with ignitor.

It rained and flooded our basement where the water heater is. The heater is not raised and the burner sits close to the floor and basically got flooded and went out. I'm in the process of pumping it out. How should I go about getting the heater back operating, assuming it is not damaged but only damp, a little (or a lot dirty) etc?

Thanks

I'm heading to the hardware store for some gasketing for the cellar door to keep this from being such a large problem. Back in an hour.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 2:23:05 PM EST
Disconnect the gas line after turning off the valve on the line coming out of the wall. Disconnect the 2 lines coming out of the controll box on the heater and blow through them to push the water out, leave these lines disconnected for a few hours to allow any water in the controll box/regulator to evaporate. Before you hook it back up, build a stand that will hold your water heater at least 18 inches above the floor, this will help when it floods but also will keep the pilot above the combustible fumes if any flammable liquids are stored down there. Good luck.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 2:27:49 PM EST

Originally Posted By 03shooter:
Disconnect the gas line after turning off the valve on the line coming out of the wall. Disconnect the 2 lines coming out of the controll box on the heater and blow through them to push the water out, leave these lines disconnected for a few hours to allow any water in the controll box/regulator to evaporate. Before you hook it back up, build a stand that will hold your water heater at least 18 inches above the floor, this will help when it floods but also will keep the pilot above the combustible fumes if any flammable liquids are stored down there. Good luck.




Please if possible explain the "18inches above the floor to avoid combustable fumes" thing to me.

Link Posted: 10/27/2004 2:32:27 PM EST

Originally Posted By Bob243:

Originally Posted By 03shooter:
Disconnect the gas line after turning off the valve on the line coming out of the wall. Disconnect the 2 lines coming out of the controll box on the heater and blow through them to push the water out, leave these lines disconnected for a few hours to allow any water in the controll box/regulator to evaporate. Before you hook it back up, build a stand that will hold your water heater at least 18 inches above the floor, this will help when it floods but also will keep the pilot above the combustible fumes if any flammable liquids are stored down there. Good luck.




Please if possible explain the "18inches above the floor to avoid combustable fumes" thing to me.




It's code in the city's that I work in, I work for the largest natural gas company in the U.S. Most flameable liquids produce fumes that are heavier than air, therefore they tend to settle to floor level. If the pilot on the heater is at floor level it can ignite the fumes, 18 inches up and it is less of a danger.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 2:39:31 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 3:24:13 PM EST
No need to build a stand – Home Depot and other home improvement stores sell them pre-made.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 3:26:52 PM EST
Very interesting.. Thanks for the info. I will definately keep it in the back of my mind.

(I have an elect water heater)
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