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Posted: 12/11/2013 9:01:00 PM EST
Steven M. Bellovin, a computer science professor at Columbia, uncovered a startling fact. The launch code for all U.S. Minuteman nuclear missiles for 20 years used the same code: 00000000.
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And the crews knew!!

The code itself wasn’t very secret, either. According to Karl Smallwood on Today I Found Out, Dr. Blair explained: “Our launch checklist in fact instructed us, the firing crew, to double-check the locking panel in our underground launch bunker to ensure that no digits other than zero had been inadvertently dialed into the panel.”
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http://mashable.com/2013/12/04/us-nukes-launch-code/?utm_cid=mash-com-fb-main-link
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:05:48 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 9:06:55 PM EST by tesla120]
The main NSA computer password is "Password" too.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:06:33 PM EST
123456 works allot to
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:07:27 PM EST
Easy to remember under stress, you see.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:08:30 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:09:26 PM EST
It's so simple it's BRILLIANT!!!!
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:10:31 PM EST

Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:15:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 9:19:03 PM EST by Rotors-R-Cool]
Lot of hype about nothing. I don't know anything about the launch sequence. But I bet that "000000" code is one in a list of MANY codes and steps to successfully launch a missile.

This is a story designed to make idiots who know nothing about the proper sequence think it was weak security. The security of multi-character codes has more to do with the number of possible codes than the actual code itself.

To a hacking program, 000000, if74m6, and PASSWORD are all equally secure. Plus, do you really think any of the other countries thought it was actually 0's? Do you really think that even if they were going to guess that they would have guessed 0's? And the fact that we know have this information probably means the code has never been broken and has already been changed to something else.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:18:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 9:22:30 PM EST by slick556]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Rotors-R-Cool:
Lot of hype about nothing. I don't know anything about the launch sequence. But I bet that "000000" code is one in a list of MANY codes and steps to successfully launch a missile.

This is a story designed to make idiots who know nothing about the proper sequence think it was weak security. The security of multi-character codes lies more in the number of possible codes than the actual code itself.

To a hacking program, 000000, if74m6, and PASSWORD are all equally secure.
View Quote


Yeah, but 000000 for 20 years?

FFS, AKO makes me change my password every 90 days! That's right, AKO has better security then nuke launch codes used to.

Ummm yeah , and I'll be at Lowes buying a fuckton of concrete and a backhoe to dig a new 'wine cellar' if anyone needs me.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:25:04 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 9:31:16 PM EST by Gamma762]
It's entirely possible that that particular code was integrated into the design of the missile system, and had later been superseded by other security procedures rendering it superfluous. Where there are many redundant systems, zeroing out one of the redundant systems limits potential for error with no effective change in security.

As a SWAG, if you read the open source history of weapons evolution, it seems likely that a security code was integrated into the warhead itself, so the decision was probably made to zero the redundant security code for the launch vehicle.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:31:34 PM EST
There is nothing new to the story, it has been know since the end of the Cold War. The use of launch codes was a demand by politicians, who realized that they didn't have "real" control over the missiles. General LeMay conceded, and made SAC use all zeros. He did argue that like all off the US special weapons (that's what they are really called), the Air Force ICBM's were and are under "Two Man Control", and with the exception of some of the tactical special weapons, it requires both individuals to agree to use the weapon. For example the launch keys are quite a distance apart, and have to be turned at the same time. No one man can accomplish this by himself. The chances of two people going off the rails, and launching was deemed an acceptable risk.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:38:04 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By slick556:


Yeah, but 000000 for 20 years?

FFS, AKO makes me change my password every 90 days! That's right, AKO has better security then nuke launch codes used to.

Ummm yeah , and I'll be at Lowes buying a fuckton of concrete and a backhoe to dig a new 'wine cellar' if anyone needs me.
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Originally Posted By slick556:
Originally Posted By Rotors-R-Cool:
Lot of hype about nothing. I don't know anything about the launch sequence. But I bet that "000000" code is one in a list of MANY codes and steps to successfully launch a missile.

This is a story designed to make idiots who know nothing about the proper sequence think it was weak security. The security of multi-character codes lies more in the number of possible codes than the actual code itself.

To a hacking program, 000000, if74m6, and PASSWORD are all equally secure.


Yeah, but 000000 for 20 years?

FFS, AKO makes me change my password every 90 days! That's right, AKO has better security then nuke launch codes used to.

Ummm yeah , and I'll be at Lowes buying a fuckton of concrete and a backhoe to dig a new 'wine cellar' if anyone needs me.


I wouldn't be surprised to know that they are still on analog also.

A closed analog system would seem much more secure than a digital one requiring an expiration on a p/w.


But then again, I'm not a missile man.

Paging LimaXray...


Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:46:19 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By slick556:


Yeah, but 000000 for 20 years?

FFS, AKO makes me change my password every 90 days! That's right, AKO has better security then nuke launch codes used to.

Ummm yeah , and I'll be at Lowes buying a fuckton of concrete and a backhoe to dig a new 'wine cellar' if anyone needs me.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By slick556:
Originally Posted By Rotors-R-Cool:
Lot of hype about nothing. I don't know anything about the launch sequence. But I bet that "000000" code is one in a list of MANY codes and steps to successfully launch a missile.

This is a story designed to make idiots who know nothing about the proper sequence think it was weak security. The security of multi-character codes lies more in the number of possible codes than the actual code itself.

To a hacking program, 000000, if74m6, and PASSWORD are all equally secure.


Yeah, but 000000 for 20 years?

FFS, AKO makes me change my password every 90 days! That's right, AKO has better security then nuke launch codes used to.

Ummm yeah , and I'll be at Lowes buying a fuckton of concrete and a backhoe to dig a new 'wine cellar' if anyone needs me.

No, AKO has significantly worse security. They mandate a certain number of upper and lower characters and special characters, which significantly reduces the search space. I don't know if there's a maximum character limit, but there is absolutely no reason that a password should EVER have a max length. Passwords in any reasonable system are stored in the form of a salted hash, so it doesn't matter how long the input string is. The hash is always the same length no matter the input.

Not to mention that mandating a password change every 90 days encourages REALLY awful behaviors, like writing down the password on a sticky or using the ubiquitous "ramp" that satisfies password complexity requirements but is pure babytown frolics. Easy to remember, trivial to shoulder-surf, and has a linear complexity to brute force.





Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:53:04 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
There is nothing new to the story, it has been know since the end of the Cold War. The use of launch codes was a demand by politicians, who realized that they didn't have "real" control over the missiles. General LeMay conceded, and made SAC use all zeros. He did argue that like all off the US special weapons (that's what they are really called), the Air Force ICBM's were and are under "Two Man Control", and with the exception of some of the tactical special weapons, it requires both individuals to agree to use the weapon. For example the launch keys are quite a distance apart, and have to be turned at the same time. No one man can accomplish this by himself. The chances of two people going off the rails, and launching was deemed an acceptable risk.
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Wanna bet? Gimme two vise grips and a length of string...
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 9:54:41 PM EST
I don't know about the Air Force, but in the 1980's the US Army used digital comms. It was called "Flash Traffic" when a message was received from the NCA (National Command Authority), our Field Artillery Battalion would decode the message. Obviously, the only messages the we ever received were the normal comm check during alerts and then off and on at random times. Had we received the message authorizing release of the special weapons, then we would have gone to Geissen Depot and then picked them up. Once we had them, any single man could fire one. I'm talking about the M454, 155mm cannon launched Nuclear warhead.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 10:03:52 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By tesla120:
The main NSA computer password is "Password" too.
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FPNI, and now i need to stop laughing before i pop the staples in my gut!
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 10:05:29 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
I don't know about the Air Force, but in the 1980's the US Army used digital comms. It was called "Flash Traffic" when a message was received from the NCA (National Command Authority), our Field Artillery Battalion would decode the message. Obviously, the only messages the we ever received were the normal comm check during alerts and then off and on at random times. Had we received the message authorizing release of the special weapons, then we would have gone to Geissen Depot and then picked them up. Once we had them, any single man could fire one. I'm talking about the M454, 155mm cannon launched Nuclear warhead.
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Don't forget the Flash Override precedence, which gave some lucky phones a FO button.

Link Posted: 12/11/2013 10:23:14 PM EST
Really don't think changing the password was necessary. back in the days of the atlas/titan leading up to the minuteman they were stored underground and the crews lived down there with them. it's not like russia could have gone to missle.gov and typed in 00000000 and fucked shit up.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 10:38:36 PM EST
BS.

How many Coded Switch custodians out there are laughing their ass off right now. Or PC crew dogs...

Link Posted: 12/11/2013 10:54:46 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 10:58:33 PM EST by S-28]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
I don't know about the Air Force, but in the 1980's the US Army used digital comms. It was called "Flash Traffic" when a message was received from the NCA (National Command Authority), our Field Artillery Battalion would decode the message. Obviously, the only messages the we ever received were the normal comm check during alerts and then off and on at random times. Had we received the message authorizing release of the special weapons, then we would have gone to Geissen Depot and then picked them up. Once we had them, any single man could fire one. I'm talking about the M454, 155mm cannon launched Nuclear warhead.
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Dunno about that one.

If a guy wasn't directly in the loop, it could be percieved as pretty simple from mission outline though, as it was some creepy/scary shit to sit and ponder over.
What seemed like a simple passing out of the bullets and string pulling, was actually quite involved and regimented. Small man Portable Nukes will inspire such fussyness.

I always planned on slap firing if it came to it... one last Page 11 entry for safety violations, meant Karma would be on my side.












Link Posted: 12/11/2013 11:46:56 PM EST
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Originally Posted By S-28:



Dunno about that one.

If a guy wasn't directly in the loop, it could be percieved as pretty simple from mission outline though, as it was some creepy/scary shit to sit and ponder over.
What seemed like a simple passing out of the bullets and string pulling, was actually quite involved and regimented. Small man Portable Nukes will inspire such fussyness.

I always planned on slap firing if it came to it... one last Page 11 entry for safety violations, meant Karma would be on my side.

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Originally Posted By S-28:
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
I don't know about the Air Force, but in the 1980's the US Army used digital comms. It was called "Flash Traffic" when a message was received from the NCA (National Command Authority), our Field Artillery Battalion would decode the message. Obviously, the only messages the we ever received were the normal comm check during alerts and then off and on at random times. Had we received the message authorizing release of the special weapons, then we would have gone to Geissen Depot and then picked them up. Once we had them, any single man could fire one. I'm talking about the M454, 155mm cannon launched Nuclear warhead.



Dunno about that one.

If a guy wasn't directly in the loop, it could be percieved as pretty simple from mission outline though, as it was some creepy/scary shit to sit and ponder over.
What seemed like a simple passing out of the bullets and string pulling, was actually quite involved and regimented. Small man Portable Nukes will inspire such fussyness.

I always planned on slap firing if it came to it... one last Page 11 entry for safety violations, meant Karma would be on my side.

I may have over simplified it a bit, but once the PAL (permissive action link) was off the round, it was nothing more than mating the fuse to the projectile. As long as you had that, all you need is a primer, powder bag and tube, instant canned sunshine. I would say that about half my time on the special weapons team was spent training for ED (emergency destruction). The fastest way was to take a hammer and smash all the pins on the projo. The preferred way was to use a shaped charge, and blow the round up so it wouldn't fall into enemy hands. Which leads to all the time spent in Graf playing with C4, shaped charges and det cord.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 12:29:34 AM EST
The fact that it was never broken in to is pretty good proof of how secure it was.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 2:41:31 AM EST
I doubt this. I was at the NSA on business in the mid 80's. While there I saw the typesetter that was generating and printing out the access codes for most of our nuclear arsenal. For it's day it was one impressive bit of engineering. One cool fact was that these booklets of codes were among the stuff the Walker family were selling the Russians for absurdly cheap prices. Only the Navy did not use these codes.

Link Posted: 12/12/2013 2:46:00 AM EST
I thought the W.O.P.R. was supposed to fix all that.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 3:17:03 AM EST
try space bar space bar
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 3:22:00 AM EST
Now I should ask my dad if that was in fact the Launch code. He was a Nuclear Missile Systems Officer or whatever they call em in the 70s.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 3:46:54 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
I may have over simplified it a bit, but once the PAL (permissive action link) was off the round, it was nothing more than mating the fuse to the projectile. As long as you had that, all you need is a primer, powder bag and tube, instant canned sunshine. I would say that about half my time on the special weapons team was spent training for ED (emergency destruction). The fastest way was to take a hammer and smash all the pins on the projo. The preferred way was to use a shaped charge, and blow the round up so it wouldn't fall into enemy hands. Which leads to all the time spent in Graf playing with C4, shaped charges and det cord.
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Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
Originally Posted By S-28:
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
I don't know about the Air Force, but in the 1980's the US Army used digital comms. It was called "Flash Traffic" when a message was received from the NCA (National Command Authority), our Field Artillery Battalion would decode the message. Obviously, the only messages the we ever received were the normal comm check during alerts and then off and on at random times. Had we received the message authorizing release of the special weapons, then we would have gone to Geissen Depot and then picked them up. Once we had them, any single man could fire one. I'm talking about the M454, 155mm cannon launched Nuclear warhead.



Dunno about that one.

If a guy wasn't directly in the loop, it could be percieved as pretty simple from mission outline though, as it was some creepy/scary shit to sit and ponder over.
What seemed like a simple passing out of the bullets and string pulling, was actually quite involved and regimented. Small man Portable Nukes will inspire such fussyness.

I always planned on slap firing if it came to it... one last Page 11 entry for safety violations, meant Karma would be on my side.











I may have over simplified it a bit, but once the PAL (permissive action link) was off the round, it was nothing more than mating the fuse to the projectile. As long as you had that, all you need is a primer, powder bag and tube, instant canned sunshine. I would say that about half my time on the special weapons team was spent training for ED (emergency destruction). The fastest way was to take a hammer and smash all the pins on the projo. The preferred way was to use a shaped charge, and blow the round up so it wouldn't fall into enemy hands. Which leads to all the time spent in Graf playing with C4, shaped charges and det cord.


So, just before you are overrun by the enemy you beat the nuclear warhead with a big hammer.
How often did you get to practice that?
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 3:54:18 AM EST
The second step in the launch procedure has password of 1111111
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 3:56:32 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By phurba:

No, AKO has significantly worse security. They mandate a certain number of upper and lower characters and special characters, which significantly reduces the search space. I don't know if there's a maximum character limit, but there is absolutely no reason that a password should EVER have a max length. Passwords in any reasonable system are stored in the form of a salted hash, so it doesn't matter how long the input string is. The hash is always the same length no matter the input.

Not to mention that mandating a password change every 90 days encourages REALLY awful behaviors, like writing down the password on a sticky or using the ubiquitous "ramp" that satisfies password complexity requirements but is pure babytown frolics. Easy to remember, trivial to shoulder-surf, and has a linear complexity to brute force.


http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/password_strength.png

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmarNEsjpDI
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Originally Posted By phurba:
Originally Posted By slick556:
Originally Posted By Rotors-R-Cool:
Lot of hype about nothing. I don't know anything about the launch sequence. But I bet that "000000" code is one in a list of MANY codes and steps to successfully launch a missile.

This is a story designed to make idiots who know nothing about the proper sequence think it was weak security. The security of multi-character codes lies more in the number of possible codes than the actual code itself.

To a hacking program, 000000, if74m6, and PASSWORD are all equally secure.


Yeah, but 000000 for 20 years?

FFS, AKO makes me change my password every 90 days! That's right, AKO has better security then nuke launch codes used to.

Ummm yeah , and I'll be at Lowes buying a fuckton of concrete and a backhoe to dig a new 'wine cellar' if anyone needs me.

No, AKO has significantly worse security. They mandate a certain number of upper and lower characters and special characters, which significantly reduces the search space. I don't know if there's a maximum character limit, but there is absolutely no reason that a password should EVER have a max length. Passwords in any reasonable system are stored in the form of a salted hash, so it doesn't matter how long the input string is. The hash is always the same length no matter the input.

Not to mention that mandating a password change every 90 days encourages REALLY awful behaviors, like writing down the password on a sticky or using the ubiquitous "ramp" that satisfies password complexity requirements but is pure babytown frolics. Easy to remember, trivial to shoulder-surf, and has a linear complexity to brute force.


http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/password_strength.png

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmarNEsjpDI


That XKCD actually changed how I make my passwords. The limit on me, though, is the uppercase/number/special character requirements. And length.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 4:02:44 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By phurba:

No, AKO has significantly worse security. They mandate a certain number of upper and lower characters and special characters, which significantly reduces the search space. I don't know if there's a maximum character limit, but there is absolutely no reason that a password should EVER have a max length. Passwords in any reasonable system are stored in the form of a salted hash, so it doesn't matter how long the input string is. The hash is always the same length no matter the input.

Not to mention that mandating a password change every 90 days encourages REALLY awful behaviors, like writing down the password on a sticky or using the ubiquitous "ramp" that satisfies password complexity requirements but is pure babytown frolics. Easy to remember, trivial to shoulder-surf, and has a linear complexity to brute force.


http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/password_strength.png

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmarNEsjpDI
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Originally Posted By phurba:
Originally Posted By slick556:
Originally Posted By Rotors-R-Cool:
Lot of hype about nothing. I don't know anything about the launch sequence. But I bet that "000000" code is one in a list of MANY codes and steps to successfully launch a missile.

This is a story designed to make idiots who know nothing about the proper sequence think it was weak security. The security of multi-character codes lies more in the number of possible codes than the actual code itself.

To a hacking program, 000000, if74m6, and PASSWORD are all equally secure.


Yeah, but 000000 for 20 years?

FFS, AKO makes me change my password every 90 days! That's right, AKO has better security then nuke launch codes used to.

Ummm yeah , and I'll be at Lowes buying a fuckton of concrete and a backhoe to dig a new 'wine cellar' if anyone needs me.

No, AKO has significantly worse security. They mandate a certain number of upper and lower characters and special characters, which significantly reduces the search space. I don't know if there's a maximum character limit, but there is absolutely no reason that a password should EVER have a max length. Passwords in any reasonable system are stored in the form of a salted hash, so it doesn't matter how long the input string is. The hash is always the same length no matter the input.

Not to mention that mandating a password change every 90 days encourages REALLY awful behaviors, like writing down the password on a sticky or using the ubiquitous "ramp" that satisfies password complexity requirements but is pure babytown frolics. Easy to remember, trivial to shoulder-surf, and has a linear complexity to brute force.


http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/password_strength.png

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmarNEsjpDI

Excellent post. I would subscribe to your newsletter.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 8:34:13 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Rich_V:


So, just before you are overrun by the enemy you beat the nuclear warhead with a big hammer.
How often did you get to practice that?
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Originally Posted By Rich_V:
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:

I may have over simplified it a bit, but once the PAL (permissive action link) was off the round, it was nothing more than mating the fuse to the projectile. As long as you had that, all you need is a primer, powder bag and tube, instant canned sunshine. I would say that about half my time on the special weapons team was spent training for ED (emergency destruction). The fastest way was to take a hammer and smash all the pins on the projo. The preferred way was to use a shaped charge, and blow the round up so it wouldn't fall into enemy hands. Which leads to all the time spent in Graf playing with C4, shaped charges and det cord.


So, just before you are overrun by the enemy you beat the nuclear warhead with a big hammer.
How often did you get to practice that?
As bizarre as that sounds, yes before being over run, we were to beat the warhead with a hammer. Like I said the preferred method was to use a shaped charged explosive to destroy the projectile. All US special weapons are "One Point Safe", meaning that detonating any "one" point would not cause a chain reaction (Canned Sunshine). What it would do, is spread plutonium all over the fracking place, very nasty. Since the weapon had be in "Two Man Control" at all times, we were to place the charge, move back 300 meters, and while keeping the weapon in view at all times, pop the time fuse that would detonate the shape charge. All this in MOPP 4 of course, wouldn't want anybody to get hurt.

If there wasn't time for that, then the expedient method was to destroy the fuse mating pins on the projectile. The fuse itself contained no explosive, only electrical circuits. This was to be done with a hammer, or similar object, the butt stock of an M16 would do nicely. Once that was done, thermite grenades were to be placed in the breach of the cannon, and the fuse taken with you as you un-ass the AO.

One poster above stated they saw the device that produced the "Go" codes. If he did, probably what they saw was the equipment to produce the "EAM" or emergency action message. This is the coded message that determines what part of the SIOP (Single Integrated Operating Plan) is put into action. Or to put it another way, A comms check, release of weapons, limited tactical strike, or all out retaliation.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 8:49:07 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
As bizarre as that sounds, yes before being over run, we were to beat the warhead with a hammer. Like I said the preferred method was to use a shaped charged explosive to destroy the projectile. All US special weapons are "One Point Safe", meaning that detonating any "one" point would not cause a chain reaction (Canned Sunshine). What it would do, is spread plutonium all over the fracking place, very nasty. Since the weapon had be in "Two Man Control" at all times, we were to place the charge, move back 300 meters, and while keeping the weapon in view at all times, pop the time fuse that would detonate the shape charge. All this in MOPP 4 of course, wouldn't want anybody to get hurt.

If there wasn't time for that, then the expedient method was to destroy the fuse mating pins on the projectile. The fuse itself contained no explosive, only electrical circuits. This was to be done with a hammer, or similar object, the butt stock of an M16 would do nicely. Once that was done, thermite grenades were to be placed in the breach of the cannon, and the fuse taken with you as you un-ass the AO.

One poster above stated they saw the device that produced the "Go" codes. If he did, probably what they saw was the equipment to produce the "EAM" or emergency action message. This is the coded message that determines what part of the SIOP (Single Integrated Operating Plan) is put into action. Or to put it another way, A comms check, release of weapons, limited tactical strike, or all out retaliation.
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Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
Originally Posted By Rich_V:
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:

I may have over simplified it a bit, but once the PAL (permissive action link) was off the round, it was nothing more than mating the fuse to the projectile. As long as you had that, all you need is a primer, powder bag and tube, instant canned sunshine. I would say that about half my time on the special weapons team was spent training for ED (emergency destruction). The fastest way was to take a hammer and smash all the pins on the projo. The preferred way was to use a shaped charge, and blow the round up so it wouldn't fall into enemy hands. Which leads to all the time spent in Graf playing with C4, shaped charges and det cord.


So, just before you are overrun by the enemy you beat the nuclear warhead with a big hammer.
How often did you get to practice that?
As bizarre as that sounds, yes before being over run, we were to beat the warhead with a hammer. Like I said the preferred method was to use a shaped charged explosive to destroy the projectile. All US special weapons are "One Point Safe", meaning that detonating any "one" point would not cause a chain reaction (Canned Sunshine). What it would do, is spread plutonium all over the fracking place, very nasty. Since the weapon had be in "Two Man Control" at all times, we were to place the charge, move back 300 meters, and while keeping the weapon in view at all times, pop the time fuse that would detonate the shape charge. All this in MOPP 4 of course, wouldn't want anybody to get hurt.

If there wasn't time for that, then the expedient method was to destroy the fuse mating pins on the projectile. The fuse itself contained no explosive, only electrical circuits. This was to be done with a hammer, or similar object, the butt stock of an M16 would do nicely. Once that was done, thermite grenades were to be placed in the breach of the cannon, and the fuse taken with you as you un-ass the AO.

One poster above stated they saw the device that produced the "Go" codes. If he did, probably what they saw was the equipment to produce the "EAM" or emergency action message. This is the coded message that determines what part of the SIOP (Single Integrated Operating Plan) is put into action. Or to put it another way, A comms check, release of weapons, limited tactical strike, or all out retaliation.


As I remember, nuclear artillery was envisioned to be used against a soviet armor invasion in Europe. The bomb lethal range was just about equal to the artillery range. That is a lot of pucker factor for the guys pulling the trigger.
Thanks for your service.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 9:04:34 AM EST
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As I remember, nuclear artillery was envisioned to be used against a soviet armor invasion in Europe. The bomb lethal range was just about equal to the artillery range. That is a lot of pucker factor for the guys pulling the trigger.
Thanks for your service.
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The comments below will put it into perspective, and the mission remained the same until the fall of the Soviet Union.

From Ron Chiste in 2005:
6th Bn, 40th Field Artillery, 3AD

In July, 1970 I arrived to my first permanent duty station in Hanau, West Germany, 6/40 Field Artillery (8" self-propelled howitzers - nuclear capable), after graduating from Artillery OCS and Paratrooper School. One of the unannounced monthly events to which we became accustomed were the surprise alerts during which we had to follow very detailed loading plans and move the entire battalion to an alert position to await further orders. It was a test of our speed and efficiency in preparing the battalion to move to its war position if "the balloon went up."

I had enlisted in the army at the age of 25 and had a bit of life experience under my belt, so I suppose I wasn't the typical unquestioning new lieutenant. At least once a year the battalion received a secret briefing from a general and his staff regarding war plans for the respective battalions. The briefing was referred to as the EDP (Emergency Deployment Position) Briefing and was held on the kaserne in a large room with armed guards posted and windows blackened. Plans for the transport and possible use of our nuclear rounds, of course, would be part of the discussion.

I was in awe attending my first briefing and listened intently as the general described the little amount of time the battalion would have to get to its position from the time it got the alert. In the time he gave us it would have been impossible to load all TO&E equipment and get to the position within or adjacent the Fulda Gap.

At the end of the briefing the general asked if there were any questions. I raised my hand to the utter disbelief of all the more senior officers in the room. I was a bit naive about the protocol at this point in my career. I was acknowledged and asked the question about the time he was allowing us. His response was amazing to us all, "You will not be taking tents, field kitchens, or anything like that with you. C and B Batteries will be racing across the Fulda River and A battery will be held in reserve."

And even more sobering was the general's next comment, which probably no one at that briefing has ever forgotten, "We don't expect C and B to come back."

There were no more questions and when we left the briefing the joke became, "How do we transfer to A Battery?" I think at that point we all gained a new sense of seriousness about our role in preventing the Soviet block from rolling across the East German and Czech borders to occupy Western Europe.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 9:12:18 AM EST
Analog? Nuclear?
You know who else was analog and nuclear?

AND THEY FUCKING SAVED THE PLANET.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 9:19:40 AM EST
please tell me im in before limaxray
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 9:24:38 AM EST
no i saw it in a documentary once that the launch code was CPE1704TKS
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 9:29:29 AM EST
USAF ICBM Missile Launch Procedures Manual

NOTE:
Launch codes can only be changed after the first operational use of the launch system.
Changing launch codes prior to first operational use of the launch system cannot be accomplished at the launch terminal.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 10:13:25 AM EST
I was on the PAL Management Control Team for PACOM in the mid to late '80s. I don't know whether the Minuteman launch codes were, in fact, all zeros but I can tell you that the rest of the article in the OP is pure, unadulterated bullshit. There is an extremely large amount to the tactical and strategic nuclear command and control system other than that discussed in the article and in addition to simple Two Man Rule.

And that is all I'm going to say about that.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 10:15:30 AM EST
Not 12345678?
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 8:02:59 PM EST
Originally Posted By slick556:
Steven M. Bellovin, a computer science professor at Columbia, uncovered a startling fact. The launch code for all U.S. Minuteman nuclear missiles for 20 years used the same code: 00000000.
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And the crews knew!!

The code itself wasn’t very secret, either. According to Karl Smallwood on Today I Found Out, Dr. Blair explained: “Our launch checklist in fact instructed us, the firing crew, to double-check the locking panel in our underground launch bunker to ensure that no digits other than zero had been inadvertently dialed into the panel.”
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http://mashable.com/2013/12/04/us-nukes-launch-code/?utm_cid=mash-com-fb-main-link
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It's not like they left the blast doors open or anything.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 8:05:00 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 8:20:32 PM EST
Iirc limaxray called BS on that.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 8:33:45 PM EST
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Originally Posted By FrankDrebin:
The fact that it was never broken in to is pretty good proof of how secure it was.
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Funny related story.

Sys admin I know told me once early in his career he was with a company that had just started issuing PC terminals to employees with sensitive data on them and they had to assign a password to their account. His password was simply "A" because it was easy to remember and back then there were no restrictions about length or characters in the required password.

Fast forward several years and they eventually changed policy on new passwords, requiring a minimum length and that they contain X number of letters and Y number of numerals, but they grandfathered all the old accounts and didn't require they update their passwords. He concluded that he had the most secure password in the system because:

1) It didn't conform to the expected format so it wouldn't be guessed in a brute force type attack.
2) Nobody would anticipate such a stupidly simple password would actually be in use.

I laughed at the absurdity of the story, but really it made sense in a way.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 9:10:32 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 9:28:11 PM EST
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Originally Posted By ttushooter:
Iirc limaxray called BS on that.
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he'd be the SME here

Link Posted: 12/12/2013 10:16:36 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Cypher15:
please tell me im in before limaxray
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I'm just here for the recipes. I'm thinking about making some treats and taking them to work Sat night but not sure what I should make. Hoping he has some suggestions.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 10:19:57 PM EST

Yeah, the code 000000 was easy, but the lock switches were IMPOSSIBLE to pick...

Link Posted: 12/12/2013 10:31:10 PM EST
The gate code to my work was 1234. Figure that out, and there is nothing stopping you from hopping in a brand new Volvo semi, full of product, and driving off with it...
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 10:35:15 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ATC:
The gate code to my work was 1234. Figure that out, and there is nothing stopping you from hopping in a brand new Volvo semi, full of product, and driving off with it...
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I want to send you a Christmas card. What is the address of your company....?
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 10:39:32 PM EST
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Originally Posted By mike-munich:


I want to send you a Christmas card Strippers. What is the address of your company....?
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Originally Posted By mike-munich:
Originally Posted By ATC:
The gate code to my work was 1234. Figure that out, and there is nothing stopping you from hopping in a brand new Volvo semi, full of product, and driving off with it...


I want to send you a Christmas card Strippers. What is the address of your company....?



Pick me!
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 10:44:09 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History


nothing is impossible
medeco
multilock
assa abloy
they've all been picked.
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