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Posted: 1/21/2013 12:51:03 PM EDT
http://articles.latimes.com/1992-02-27/news/mn-4092_1_criminal-justice-system

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/25/opinion/japans-inept-guardians.html?_r=0

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7063316.stm

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2002/nov/15/worlddispatch.japan

http://www.prisontalk.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-159095.html

Illegal gun possession, like illegal drug possession, is a consensual offense. There is no victim to complain to the police. Accordingly, in order to find illegal guns, the Japanese police are given broad search and seizure powers. The basic firearms law permits a policeman to search a person's belongings if the officer judges there is 'sufficient suspicion that a person is carrying a fire-arm, a sword or a knife' or if he judges that a person 'is likely to endanger life or body of other persons judging reasonably from his abnormal behavior or any other surrounding circumstances'.[32] Once a weapon is found, the policeman may confiscate it. Even if the confiscation is later admitted to be an error, the firearm is sometimes not returned.[33](p.29)

In practice, the special law for weapons searches is not necessary, since the police routinely search at will. They ask suspicious characters to show them what is in their purse or sack.[34] In the rare cases where a policeman's search (for a gun or any other contraband) is ruled illegal, it hardly matters; the Japanese courts permit the use of illegally seized evidence.[35] And legal rules aside, Japanese, both criminals and ordinary citizens, are much the more willing than their American counterparts to consent to searches and to answer questions from the police.[36]

'Home visit is one of the most important duties of officers assigned to police...' explains the Japanese National Police Agency. In twice-a-year visit, officers fill out Residence Information Cards about who lives where and which family member to contact in case of emergency, what relation people in the house have to each other, what kind of work they do, if they work late, and what kind of cars they own.[37] The police also check on all gun licensees, to make sure that no gun has been stolen or misused, that the gun is securely stored, and that the licensees are emotionally stable.[38]

The close surveillance of gun owners and householders comports with the police tradition of keeping close tabs on many private activities.[39] For example, the nation's official year-end police report includes statistics like 'Background and Motives for Girls' Sexual Misconduct'. The police recorded 9,402 such incidents in 1985, and determined that 37.4 per cent of the girls had been seduced, and the rest had sex 'voluntarily'. The two leading reasons for having sex voluntarily were 'out of curiosity' for 19.6 per cent, and 'liked particular boy', for 18.1 per cent.[40] The fact that police keep records on sex is simply a reflection of their keeping an eye on everything, including guns. Every person is the subject of a police dossier.[41]

Almost everyone accepts the paradigm that the police should be respected. Because the police are so esteemed, the Japanese people co-operate with their police more than Americans do. Co-operation with the police also extends to obeying the laws which almost everyone believes in. The Japanese people, and even the large majority of Japanese criminals, voluntarily obey the gun controls.

There is no right to bear arms in Japan. In practical terms, there is no right to privacy against police searches. Other Western-style rights designed to protect citizens from a police state are also non-existent or feeble in Japan.

After the arrest, a suspect may be detained without bail for up to 28 days before the prosecutor brings the suspect before a judge.[42] Even after the 28 day period is completed, detention in a Japanese police station may continue on a variety of pretexts, such as preventing the defendant from destroying evidence. Rearrest on another charge, bekken taihö, is a common police tactic for starting the suspect on another 28 day interrogation process. 'Rearrest' may (p.30)occur while the suspect is still being held at the police station on the first charge. Some defendants may be held for several months without ever being brought before a judge.[43] Courts approve 99.5 per cent of prosecutors' requests for detentions.[44]

Criminal defense lawyers are the only people allowed to visit a suspect in custody, and those meetings are strictly limited. In the months while a suspect is held prisoner, the defense counsel may see his or her client for one to five meetings lasting about 15 minutes each. Even that access will be denied if it hampers the police investigation. While under detention, suspects can be interrogated 12 hours a day, allowed to bathe only every fifth day, and may be prohibited from standing up, lying down, or leaning against the wall of their jail cells.[45] Amnesty International calls the Japanese police custody system a 'flagrant violation of United Nations human rights principles'.[46]

The confession rate is 95 per cent.[47] As a Tokyo police sergeant observes, 'It is no use to protest against power'.[48] Suspects are not allowed to read confessions before they sign them, and suspects commonly complain that their confession was altered after signature. The police use confession as their main investigative technique, and when that fails, they can become frustrated and angry. The Tokyo Bar Association states that the police routinely 'engage in torture or illegal treatment'. The Tokyo Bar is particularly critical of the judiciary for its near-total disinterest in coercion during the confession process. 'Even in cases where suspects claimed to have been tortured and their bodies bore physical traces to back their claims, courts have still accepted their confessions'.[49]

In Japan, the legal system is, in effect, an omnipotent and unitary state authority. All law enforcement administrators in Japan are appointed by the National Police Agency and receive their funding from the NPA. Hence, the police are insulated from complaints from politicians or other citizens. There is hardly any check on the power of the state, save its own conscience.

What does the breadth of police powers have to do with gun controls? Japanese gun controls exist in a society where there is little need for guns for self-defense. Police powers make it difficult for owners of illegal guns to hide them. Most importantly, the Japanese criminal justice system is based on the Government possessing the inherent authority to do whatever it wishes. In a society where almost everyone accepts nearly limitless, unchecked Government power, people do not wish to own guns to resist oppression or to protect themselves in case the criminal justice system fails.

Extensive police authority is one reason the Japanese gun control system works. Another reason is that Japan has no cultural history of gun ownership by citizens.(p.31)


http://www.guncite.com/journals/dkjgc.html#fn38
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 12:57:23 PM EDT
No thanks, I could not even consider living there. I've been " spoiled " .
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 12:57:23 PM EDT
I toured a Japanese prison during the six years I lived there. It was nothing like our bs system.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 12:57:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/21/2013 12:57:47 PM EDT by djburnett]

Originally Posted By Gelgoog:
http://articles.latimes.com/1992-02-27/news/mn-4092_1_criminal-justice-system

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/25/opinion/japans-inept-guardians.html?_r=0

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7063316.stm

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2002/nov/15/worlddispatch.japan

http://www.prisontalk.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-159095.html

Illegal gun possession, like illegal drug possession, is a consensual offense. There is no victim to complain to the police. Accordingly, in order to find illegal guns, the Japanese police are given broad search and seizure powers. The basic firearms law permits a policeman to search a person's belongings if the officer judges there is 'sufficient suspicion that a person is carrying a fire-arm, a sword or a knife' or if he judges that a person 'is likely to endanger life or body of other persons judging reasonably from his abnormal behavior or any other surrounding circumstances'.[32] Once a weapon is found, the policeman may confiscate it. Even if the confiscation is later admitted to be an error, the firearm is sometimes not returned.[33](p.29)

In practice, the special law for weapons searches is not necessary, since the police routinely search at will. They ask suspicious characters to show them what is in their purse or sack.[34] In the rare cases where a policeman's search (for a gun or any other contraband) is ruled illegal, it hardly matters; the Japanese courts permit the use of illegally seized evidence.[35] And legal rules aside, Japanese, both criminals and ordinary citizens, are much the more willing than their American counterparts to consent to searches and to answer questions from the police.[36]

'Home visit is one of the most important duties of officers assigned to police...' explains the Japanese National Police Agency. In twice-a-year visit, officers fill out Residence Information Cards about who lives where and which family member to contact in case of emergency, what relation people in the house have to each other, what kind of work they do, if they work late, and what kind of cars they own.[37] The police also check on all gun licensees, to make sure that no gun has been stolen or misused, that the gun is securely stored, and that the licensees are emotionally stable.[38]

The close surveillance of gun owners and householders comports with the police tradition of keeping close tabs on many private activities.[39] For example, the nation's official year-end police report includes statistics like 'Background and Motives for Girls' Sexual Misconduct'. The police recorded 9,402 such incidents in 1985, and determined that 37.4 per cent of the girls had been seduced, and the rest had sex 'voluntarily'. The two leading reasons for having sex voluntarily were 'out of curiosity' for 19.6 per cent, and 'liked particular boy', for 18.1 per cent.[40] The fact that police keep records on sex is simply a reflection of their keeping an eye on everything, including guns. Every person is the subject of a police dossier.[41]

Almost everyone accepts the paradigm that the police should be respected. Because the police are so esteemed, the Japanese people co-operate with their police more than Americans do. Co-operation with the police also extends to obeying the laws which almost everyone believes in. The Japanese people, and even the large majority of Japanese criminals, voluntarily obey the gun controls.

There is no right to bear arms in Japan. In practical terms, there is no right to privacy against police searches. Other Western-style rights designed to protect citizens from a police state are also non-existent or feeble in Japan.

After the arrest, a suspect may be detained without bail for up to 28 days before the prosecutor brings the suspect before a judge.[42] Even after the 28 day period is completed, detention in a Japanese police station may continue on a variety of pretexts, such as preventing the defendant from destroying evidence. Rearrest on another charge, bekken taihö, is a common police tactic for starting the suspect on another 28 day interrogation process. 'Rearrest' may (p.30)occur while the suspect is still being held at the police station on the first charge. Some defendants may be held for several months without ever being brought before a judge.[43] Courts approve 99.5 per cent of prosecutors' requests for detentions.[44]

Criminal defense lawyers are the only people allowed to visit a suspect in custody, and those meetings are strictly limited. In the months while a suspect is held prisoner, the defense counsel may see his or her client for one to five meetings lasting about 15 minutes each. Even that access will be denied if it hampers the police investigation. While under detention, suspects can be interrogated 12 hours a day, allowed to bathe only every fifth day, and may be prohibited from standing up, lying down, or leaning against the wall of their jail cells.[45] Amnesty International calls the Japanese police custody system a 'flagrant violation of United Nations human rights principles'.[46]

The confession rate is 95 per cent.[47] As a Tokyo police sergeant observes, 'It is no use to protest against power'.[48] Suspects are not allowed to read confessions before they sign them, and suspects commonly complain that their confession was altered after signature. The police use confession as their main investigative technique, and when that fails, they can become frustrated and angry. The Tokyo Bar Association states that the police routinely 'engage in torture or illegal treatment'. The Tokyo Bar is particularly critical of the judiciary for its near-total disinterest in coercion during the confession process. 'Even in cases where suspects claimed to have been tortured and their bodies bore physical traces to back their claims, courts have still accepted their confessions'.[49]

In Japan, the legal system is, in effect, an omnipotent and unitary state authority. All law enforcement administrators in Japan are appointed by the National Police Agency and receive their funding from the NPA. Hence, the police are insulated from complaints from politicians or other citizens. There is hardly any check on the power of the state, save its own conscience.

What does the breadth of police powers have to do with gun controls? Japanese gun controls exist in a society where there is little need for guns for self-defense. Police powers make it difficult for owners of illegal guns to hide them. Most importantly, the Japanese criminal justice system is based on the Government possessing the inherent authority to do whatever it wishes. In a society where almost everyone accepts nearly limitless, unchecked Government power, people do not wish to own guns to resist oppression or to protect themselves in case the criminal justice system fails.

Extensive police authority is one reason the Japanese gun control system works. Another reason is that Japan has no cultural history of gun ownership by citizens.(p.31)


http://www.guncite.com/journals/dkjgc.html#fn38

Also any and all reports of crimes are up to the police deptartments discretion and there is no oversight.

Their crime numbers are based upon whatever looks best and not reality.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:01:57 PM EDT
Plus it's full of Japanese people.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:03:24 PM EDT
Having a homogeneous society helps.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:04:33 PM EDT
Where is the quoted text from?
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:06:07 PM EDT
They also sweep under the rug any case they can't solve. No body? No suspect they can easily pin it in? It didn't happen.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:10:18 PM EDT
Originally Posted By EarlBypass:
I toured a Japanese prison during the six years I lived there. It was nothing like our bs system.


I saw a documentary on their prisons.

Do not want.

Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:11:49 PM EDT
I guess it makes for a peaceful country. The flip side of this was what you had during WWII with the reverence paid to the god / emperor
If the emperor had not instructed his subjects to surrender we could still be fighting guerrilla bands.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:12:31 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:12:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/21/2013 1:13:55 PM EDT by Gelgoog]
Originally Posted By Spearweasel:
Plus it's full of Japanese people.




also

in 2005, a United Nations special rapporteur on racism and xenophobia expressed concerns about deep and profound racism in Japan and insufficient government recognition of the problem.[31][32]

Doudou Diène (Special Rapporteur of the UN Commission on Human Rights) concluded after an investigation and nine-day tour of Japan that racial discrimination and xenophobia in Japan primarily affects three groups: national minorities, descendants of former Japanese colonies and foreigners from other Asian countries.[33] In spite of the widespread belief that Japan is ethnically homogeneous, it is probably more accurate to describe it as a multiethnic society.[34]

Sankei Shimbun, a Japanese national newspaper, while expressing a support for combating discrimination, expressed doubt on the impartiality of the report, pointing out that Doudou Diène never visited Japan before and his short tour was arranged by a Japanese NGO, IMADR (International Movement Against All Forms of Discrimination). The chairman of the organization is Professor Kinhide Mushakoji (武者小路公秀), who is a board member (and the former director of the board) of the International Institute of the Juche Idea (主体思想国際研究所), an organization whose stated purpose is to propagate the official ideology of North Korea.[35]

In 2010, according to the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, Japan's record on racism has improved, but there is still room for progress.[36] The committee was critical of the lack of anti-discrimination legislation in the country and the treatment of Japanese minorities and its large Korean and Chinese communities.[23] "There seems to have been little progress since 2001," when the last review was held, committee member Regis de Gouttes said. "There is no new legislation, even though in 2001 the committee said prohibiting hate speech is compatible with freedom of expression." Many members of the committee, however, praised the Japanese government's recent recognition of the Ainu as an indigenous people.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:13:13 PM EDT
I don't believe that the police force is all that "aggressive" with the Yakuza. But, at least the police know where and who they are. LOL.

Aloha, Mark
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:13:57 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:14:04 PM EDT
Originally Posted By knifewrench:
Where is the quoted text from?


Please tell. I have an ex-pat friend living in Japan who is pro-O, pro-gun control and thinks Japan is a great place to live. I want this ammo in my corner.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:15:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By EarlBypass:
I toured a Japanese prison during the six years I lived there. It was nothing like our bs system.


Kid that grew up across the street from me sent me a friend request on FB the other day. I wasn't going to accept cause he's always been a piece of shit criminal, dealing meth etc. Anyway, this guy was on heartlands most wanted for distribution of meth, failing to appear for court, assault, and several other things felony shit. Tried to buy a gun from me 2 1/2 years ago after he got out of prison that time, I said no fuckin way, he got one from someone else, got caught with the gun and meth a few months later. Anyway, he can use facebook in prison, and gets work release with a record like that? No damn wonder he gets out and does the same shit, they've got it too damn good in jail.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:15:59 PM EDT
I'm sure abuses and corruption are rampant.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:17:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
Having a homogeneous society helps.


Fucking this.

All those countries that have low crime rates that libs like to compare the U.S. to, don't have to deal with the unavoidable issues "diversity" brings forth.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:17:10 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Spearweasel:
Plus it's full of Japanese people.


Lol, that's why I lived there for 20 years and will someday return.

Japan as a whole has a lot less laws.., go figure.

Friends wife's mothe get pissed at the wife, takes kids somewhere, wife calls the police. The police say its your mom and a family
problem. Stop wasting our time. Hahaha
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:17:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AJ_Dual:
Originally Posted By Spearweasel:
Plus it's full of Japanese people.


That's actually the biggest reason. Any number of nations are much more totalitarian than Japan, voluntary participation in the process or not, and the crime rates are still much higher.

I also imagine the Yakuza can and do manage to have or get anything they want, should they really feel the need for it.

Westerners rack disciprine.

Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:19:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Tango7:
Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
Having a homogeneous society helps.


Gee - ya think?


I believe this is the key to a relatively successful society. Too bad, but I hear they are getting black imigrants from Africa, and expats from the US, and other Western countries. They won't last too much longer.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:20:30 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
Having a homogeneous society helps.


Who had all the worrier male members Killed, Then were ruled by a Military Tyrant (Macarthur) who wrote your constitution in a way making it easy to control you!

Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:20:47 PM EDT
Why Japan has a low crime rate? Because the Bride killed all the Yakuza.

I have read this about Japan too, but you have to be very skeptical when you compare crime rates from one country to another. In a lot of countries, the police are worthless so most people don't bother to report crime.

In America, many crime is reported ony because it is an insurance requirement.


Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:22:16 PM EDT
Sounds like China .............. and kind of like (at least the beginnings of) the US; just being a bit snarky but given the loss of Liberty here and the vast under
pinning(s) of recent executive orders, rulings by the supreme court and various state infringements it appears (to me) that we are well on our way ............
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:23:30 PM EDT
copious amounts of tentacle rape
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:26:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/21/2013 1:32:34 PM EDT by 57Strat]
Where there are welfare rat breeding grounds, there is massive violent crime. It is as simple as that. Remove the violent crime stats of our nation's welfare super-centers, and our nation's violent crime rate is probably among the lowest in the world.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:28:42 PM EDT
There may not be a lot of gun crime, but crime itself is out of control, but way underreported in Japan. Unless you happen to be a Marine stationed there. Then, if you sneeze, they will arrest and try you for biological warfare.

Also, we had a guy get arrested and sent to Naja City jail. That place was no joke. Make a sound in there, and they will beat your ass. Get out of line? Ass beating. Not follow a command? Ass beating. On top of the ass beating, they feed you a subsistence level diet. Just enough to keep you alive and in a perpetual state of hunger. Our guy said " Well, my life of crime was short lived. I'm never again doing anything to get me treated like that ever again.".
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:30:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
Having a homogeneous society helps.


As stated above, reporting of the crime is way under taken. It is seen as an embarrassment to society to actually have to take someone to jail, so often, and an the spot ass whooping is delivered, and nothing else is said.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:31:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By garr:
Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
Having a homogeneous society helps.


Who had all the worrier male members Killed, Then were ruled by a Military Tyrant (Macarthur) who wrote your constitution in a way making it easy to control you!

Huh...I'd always wondered why Japanese men were so laid back.

Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:33:08 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
Having a homogeneous society helps.


Ding ding ding give the man a prize.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:39:02 PM EDT
They do have Japanese porn though.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:45:05 PM EDT


Lack of section 8 housing and a Free Shit Army is the biggest reason Japan has a low crime rate.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 1:49:22 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 2:53:08 PM EDT
They're all ninjas and everyone is afraid of each other
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 2:57:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By SKWhitlc:
There may not be a lot of gun crime, but crime itself is out of control, but way underreported in Japan. Unless you happen to be a Marine stationed there. Then, if you sneeze, they will arrest and try you for biological warfare.

Also, we had a guy get arrested and sent to Naja City jail. That place was no joke. Make a sound in there, and they will beat your ass. Get out of line? Ass beating. Not follow a command? Ass beating. On top of the ass beating, they feed you a subsistence level diet. Just enough to keep you alive and in a perpetual state of hunger. Our guy said " Well, my life of crime was short lived. I'm never again doing anything to get me treated like that ever again.".


sounds like a plan
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 3:00:50 PM EDT
Originally Posted By CombatTruckMonkey:
Originally Posted By knifewrench:
Where is the quoted text from?


Please tell. I have an ex-pat friend living in Japan who is pro-O, pro-gun control and thinks Japan is a great place to live. I want this ammo in my corner.


it is in the last link. Did you read through them?
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 3:06:47 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Zardoz:
Originally Posted By garr:
Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
Having a homogeneous society helps.


Who had all the worrier male members Killed, Then were ruled by a Military Tyrant (Macarthur) who wrote your constitution in a way making it easy to control you!

Huh...I'd always wondered why Japanese men were so laid back.



Think WW2, All the real worriers were killed by the US military or committed Hari-Kari, only men left were the Pussies!

Link Posted: 1/21/2013 3:10:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Spearweasel:
Plus it's full of Japanese people.


And therefore, it is not filled with other types of people.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 3:10:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By himajin1:
Originally Posted By Spearweasel:
Plus it's full of Japanese people.


Lol, that's why I lived there for 20 years and will someday return.

Japan as a whole has a lot less laws.., go figure.

Friends wife's mothe get pissed at the wife, takes kids somewhere, wife calls the police. The police say its your mom and a family
problem. Stop wasting our time. Hahaha


You consider that a good thing?



If my Mom were to kidnap my kids because she "got pissed" at my wife; well, I love my Mom, but I'd expect the cops to do anything up to and including shooting her to get them back. Thanks for reinforcing my desire to never live there.

Link Posted: 1/21/2013 3:14:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
Having a homogeneous society helps.



Yes it does, as European nations are becoming more diverse the are seeing a rise in crime with it.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 3:15:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/21/2013 3:56:15 PM EDT by Silver_Surfer]
The circle in the middle of their flag is not red for nothing.

VERY nice place to visit but.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 3:18:36 PM EDT
I spent 6 months living in Japan.

When I went there I was initially told I don't need to worry about theft, pickpockets, or mugging. . . I was told that in any of the major cities I could go anywhere I please anytime I please and they were right!

Japan is an awesome place with a remarkably low rate of crime.

This relates back to how well they as a society deal with natural disasters (no looting, rape, or violent gangs roaming the street)

There is a lot to be admired about the Japanese people, it's too bad any sort of model based upon the Japanese would fail here in a heartbeat.

Just my .02
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 3:29:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
Having a homogeneous society helps.


As homogeneous as Somalia?
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 3:54:34 PM EDT
Difference is shame and respect. doing something bad and getting caught shames the family, so people don't do it. Respect for authority. In America, both are lacking.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 4:13:07 PM EDT
When I first heard about it, I could not understand how an organization such as Japan's notorious THOUGHT POLICE of WWII timeframe could ever come into existence. Now I understand how.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 4:20:02 PM EDT
Originally Posted By SpawnHanz:
Originally Posted By bulldog1967:
Having a homogeneous society helps.


As homogeneous as Somalia?


When was the last time a "warlord" set up a burning tire roadblock in downtown Tokyo?

Link Posted: 1/21/2013 4:21:43 PM EDT
Well, since Switzerland has really low crime and free machine guns, I vote we emulate them.

Link Posted: 1/21/2013 4:22:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/21/2013 4:24:26 PM EDT by armoredsaint]

Originally Posted By Spearweasel:
Plus it's full of Japanese people.

+1000000000000

eta: and i'm tried of all the blurred out pornos
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 4:28:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Spearweasel:
Plus it's full of Japanese people.


YEs, the 'Diversity' That's it.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 4:31:02 PM EDT
I could see importing that system here having bipartisan support.

Law and order republicans and control freak leftists would revel in that kind of power.

Too bad about that pesky, outdated document standing in the way of that kind of real "progress".

Link Posted: 1/21/2013 4:32:01 PM EDT
They don't have a huge ghetto culture full of gimme pigs like we do.
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