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Posted: 8/30/2011 11:21:23 AM EDT
Cowboys Roping a Gray Wolf


Horse hero: Comanche, the only survivor of the Custer massacre of 1876. It was a regimental order that the 7th Cavalry cared for the animal 'as long as he shall live'


The Cavalier. A Young US Army Cavalry Soldier on his Horse

Link Posted: 8/30/2011 11:35:08 AM EDT
This thread has potential.
Link Posted: 8/30/2011 11:39:56 AM EDT



Speed
Link Posted: 8/30/2011 11:53:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2011 1:25:10 PM EDT by HOSS72198]


Dodge City
DALTON GANG
Link Posted: 8/30/2011 11:58:43 AM EDT
thats one fine looking horse. they musta zaino'd the shit outta him.
Link Posted: 8/30/2011 12:10:04 PM EDT
Mixed Carson City and Virginia City, NV.











One of my ancestors worked for the Sierra Valley Lumber Co. at the time this picture was taken.
















Sierra Buttes Mine, Sierra County, CA:



My Hometown:







Love the regions history, my family was and still is a part of it.
Link Posted: 8/30/2011 12:18:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By aimforthemedic:
This thread has potential.


and that's why i'm here now, tagging it

Link Posted: 8/30/2011 12:21:57 PM EDT
I love old photograph threads.

Sorry, don't have any Old West ones to contribute, but gotta tag.
Link Posted: 8/30/2011 12:27:07 PM EDT
Not a pic but we stopped in Tombstone in 2005, the locals are still pissed at the Earps, especially Wyatt.

I asked if the vendetta ride actually happened and how many Wyatt got. The answer was "he got all of them".

What kind of car did Wyatt Earp drive?















A 1927 De Soto, when he died in 1929, in LA.
Link Posted: 8/30/2011 4:41:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/30/2011 4:42:18 PM EDT by FMJshooter]
More please.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 4:28:22 AM EDT
"Hunting Deer." A deer hunt near Deadwood in winter '87 and '88. Two miners McMillan and Hubbard got their game
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 4:54:05 AM EDT
freaking taggage !!!
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 4:55:54 AM EDT
that Cavalry soldier can't be much over 5'6 but he looks all full of bravado.

that is my favorite of the three


great idea for a thread, I wished I has something to contribute
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 5:15:39 AM EDT
A couple pics of my Great Grandfather and his sidekick Shorty. My GG is the taller man. He was a Texas Ranger in the early 1900's then left and moved to Mexico where he guarded train cars from Poncho Villa. After both of those jobs, he came back to Texas and was the Sheriff of Marfa, Texas for several years. My uncle is currently documenting and writing a book about my Great Grandfather.







My GG and his posse, Company B, Texas Rangers



Link Posted: 8/31/2011 5:24:42 AM EDT
Me, Arizona, 1964

Link Posted: 8/31/2011 5:34:18 AM EDT
Billy Dixon, probably after the Second Battle at Adobe Walls around the time of his actions at Buffalo Wallow that led to his Medal of Honor.

Link Posted: 8/31/2011 5:49:29 AM EDT
From the archives (not my photos):


"Brig. Gen. Frank Wheaton, U.S. Army [standing center with white plume in hat], with officers and members of their families, Fort Walla Walla, Wash. Terr., 1874~." 111-SC-83652.

By lllingworth, 1874, during Black Hills expedition. 77-HQ-264-847.

"Gen. Crook's headquarters in the field at Whitewood [Dak. Terr.]. On starvation march 1876." Closeup of a camp scene shows tents improvised from wagon frames during the Black Hills expedition. 165-FF-2F-12.

"Scene of Gen. Custer's last stand, looking in the direction of the ford and the Indian village." A pile of bones on the Little Big Horn battlefield is all that remains, ca. 1877. 111-SC-82966.

"Execution of a soldier of the 8th Infantry at Prescott, Arizona, 1877." 111-SC-87810

Troop`C,' 5th Cavalry, which arrested boomers and squatters prior to opening of Oklahoma, ca. 1888. 111-SC-87369.

Officers in tent by fire during the Pine Ridge campaign, 1890––91. 111-SC-104138

"Brig. Gen. Nelson A. Miles and Buffalo Bill viewing hostile Indian camp near Pine Ridge Agency, South Dakota." By Grabill, January 16, 1891. 111-SC-85680.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 6:07:30 AM EDT
More from the archives:


A family group poses with dog, Indian domestic, and young children outside a log cabin in New Mexico Territory, ca. 1895. 111-SC-89608

"Trappers and hunters in the Four Peaks country on Brown's Basin [Ariz. Terr.]. Two Crab Tree boys, their father and the dogs and burrows [sic] which they hunt with. Their cabin is located on Long Creek, at the entrance of Hell's Hip Pocket in Brown's Basin, between Four Peaks and Salt River." By Lubkin, January 1908. 115-JAA-2667

Buffalo grazing near buffalo yards, Wichita National Forest, Okla., March 11, 1908. 95-G-76223

"Hancock homestead. Settler from Benson, Minn." Little girl feeding chickens against background of house, buckboard wagon, and ridge of plateau, Sun River, Mont. By Lubkin, June 23, 1910. 115-JAD-224.

"Inside view of Cold Springs reservoir." A panoramic view of men at work on the Umatilla reclamation project in Oregon. Horsedrawn carts, a train, and a crane are diverse technological applications in this irrigation project. By William J. Lubkin, September 17, 1907. 115-JAE-239

Roundup on the Sherman Ranch, Genesee, Kans. Cowboy with lasso readied looks beyond the herd on the open range to his fellow cowpunchers waiting on the horizon, ca. 1902. 165-XS-27

"Residence of G. L. Rule Feb. 18, 1898. Have lived here since Sept. 1893." Family stands in foreground; sod building and cabin in background, Arizona Territory. 48-RST-7B-4

View of Chinese fishing camp against a hillside. Drying grounds, nets cast out to sea, and shanties hugging the shoreline. Point San Pedro, San Francisco Bay, ca. 1889. By Townsend. 22-FA-145

Orena, Nev., Montezuma silver smelting works. Ox teams and men at rest. By O'Sullivan, 1867. 77-KN-83

"The Covered Wagon of the Great Western Migration. 1886 in Loup Valley, Nebr." A family poses with the wagon in which they live and travel daily during their pursuit of a homestead. 69-N-13606C

"Holding Down A Lot In Guthrie." By C. P. Rich, ca. 1889. 48-RST-7B-77

"First train [and wagons] leaving the line north of Orlando For Perry [Okla. Terr.], Sept. 16, 1893." 49-AR-7

Civil War Veterans, Fourth of July or Decoration Day, Ortonville, Minnesota. On review in center of town, ca. 1880. 200-M-112.

"Parade of U.S. Infantry through Kearney, Nebraska, 1888." 165-FF-6G-6

"In Wind Cave, S.D. 350 feet below the surface at Odd Fellows' Hall." William Jennings Bryan and Governor Lee in center front of group. By W. R. Cross, ca. 1897. 48-RST-5D-1

"Col. Roosevelt, Reno, Nev." Campaigning from an open touring car decorated with American flags, ca. 1910. Theodore Roosevelt is No. 3; his chauffeur is at the crank. 200-M-104

Link Posted: 8/31/2011 6:08:36 AM EDT
very cool.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 6:16:47 AM EDT
Very good thread.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 6:25:48 AM EDT
this thread delivers !
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 6:38:40 AM EDT
Awesome thread, Last mounted calvary trooper in the family was my Great Uncle Zigmund in the early 1930s when they had to turn there mounts in.



CD
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 6:39:32 AM EDT
Great photos.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 6:52:18 AM EDT
Originally Posted By genesis:
very cool.


I love when peoples icons are in line with their post.

Link Posted: 8/31/2011 6:56:47 AM EDT
My grandfather was born in 1903 in the Territory of AZ, around Prescott. He loved the old west because it was very real to him. Could be BS, but family lore is that his grandmother was the first red haired white woman in the territory of AZ and that indians would come by just to have a look.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 6:58:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2011 7:01:37 AM EDT by 6winchester2]
Originally Posted By aimforthemedic:
From the archives (not my photos):

http://media.nara.gov/media/images/43/6/43-0503a.gif
"Brig. Gen. Frank Wheaton, U.S. Army [standing center with white plume in hat], with officers and members of their families, Fort Walla Walla, Wash. Terr., 1874~." 111-SC-83652.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/046.jpg
By lllingworth, 1874, during Black Hills expedition. 77-HQ-264-847.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/049.jpg
"Gen. Crook's headquarters in the field at Whitewood [Dak. Terr.]. On starvation march 1876." Closeup of a camp scene shows tents improvised from wagon frames during the Black Hills expedition. 165-FF-2F-12.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/050.jpg
"Scene of Gen. Custer's last stand, looking in the direction of the ford and the Indian village." A pile of bones on the Little Big Horn battlefield is all that remains, ca. 1877. 111-SC-82966.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/053.jpg
"Execution of a soldier of the 8th Infantry at Prescott, Arizona, 1877." 111-SC-87810
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/057.jpg
Troop`C,' 5th Cavalry, which arrested boomers and squatters prior to opening of Oklahoma, ca. 1888. 111-SC-87369.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/060.jpg
Officers in tent by fire during the Pine Ridge campaign, 1890––91. 111-SC-104138
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/062.jpg
"Brig. Gen. Nelson A. Miles and Buffalo Bill viewing hostile Indian camp near Pine Ridge Agency, South Dakota." By Grabill, January 16, 1891. 111-SC-85680.


A note about one of those photographs.

General George Crook played a role in the Battle of the Little Big Horn.

Crook was marching northwards out of Fort Fetterman with a large force of cavalry along with some Crow scouts, at the same time that Custer was marching in a south westerly direction with the 7th Cav.

General Terry (in overall command) had intelligence that there was a large force of non-treaty Lakota Sioux led by Sitting Bull "somewhere" in the vicinity of the Powder River/Tongue River/Little Big Horn country, but no one knew
exactly where they were.

Terry's plan was to catch them in a pincer movement, with additional troops marching in from further west to cut off their retreat in that direction (so there were actually three prongs coming towards the hostiles).

Crook's force made contact with Sitting Bull's warriors before either of the other two "prongs" did, and a major battle - the Battle of the Rosebud - erupted, in which Crook's forces were overwhelmed by the size of the hostile indian camp, and he was forced to retreat.

This was the first indication that anyone had as to the exact size of Sitting Bull's forces. Both Terry and Custer estimated their number at between 800 and 1500 (at most), but their actual number was well over 2000.

Because there was no modern command, control, and communications (C3) in those days, Terry and Custer had no way of knowing that Crook's element had already been overpowered and driven back. (Today, of course, commanders would be passing this battlefield intelligence back and forth in real time).

Crook attempted to send a runner on horseback to link up with Custer's element and warn him, but because of the distance involved (and because the runner may have gotten lost in the wilderness which he was not familiar with), his warning never reached Custer in time.

Link Posted: 8/31/2011 7:42:28 AM EDT
The Interview. Standing Elk, No. 1; Running Hog, No. 2; Little Wolf, No. 3; Col. Oelrich, No. 4; Interpreter, No. 5 Three Cheyenne men wearing ceremonial clothing and holding rifles, greeting a Euro-American man in a suit and his interpreter in front of a building. [between 1887 and 1892]

Link Posted: 8/31/2011 7:54:54 AM EDT




Link Posted: 8/31/2011 7:56:27 AM EDT
Great thread.

Thanks to all for sharing the great photos.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 7:59:45 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 6winchester2:
Originally Posted By aimforthemedic:
From the archives (not my photos):

http://media.nara.gov/media/images/43/6/43-0503a.gif
"Brig. Gen. Frank Wheaton, U.S. Army [standing center with white plume in hat], with officers and members of their families, Fort Walla Walla, Wash. Terr., 1874~." 111-SC-83652.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/046.jpg
By lllingworth, 1874, during Black Hills expedition. 77-HQ-264-847.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/049.jpg
"Gen. Crook's headquarters in the field at Whitewood [Dak. Terr.]. On starvation march 1876." Closeup of a camp scene shows tents improvised from wagon frames during the Black Hills expedition. 165-FF-2F-12.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/050.jpg
"Scene of Gen. Custer's last stand, looking in the direction of the ford and the Indian village." A pile of bones on the Little Big Horn battlefield is all that remains, ca. 1877. 111-SC-82966.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/053.jpg
"Execution of a soldier of the 8th Infantry at Prescott, Arizona, 1877." 111-SC-87810
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/057.jpg
Troop`C,' 5th Cavalry, which arrested boomers and squatters prior to opening of Oklahoma, ca. 1888. 111-SC-87369.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/060.jpg
Officers in tent by fire during the Pine Ridge campaign, 1890––91. 111-SC-104138
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/062.jpg
"Brig. Gen. Nelson A. Miles and Buffalo Bill viewing hostile Indian camp near Pine Ridge Agency, South Dakota." By Grabill, January 16, 1891. 111-SC-85680.


A note about one of those photographs.

General George Crook played a role in the Battle of the Little Big Horn.

Crook was marching northwards out of Fort Fetterman with a large force of cavalry along with some Crow scouts, at the same time that Custer was marching in a south westerly direction with the 7th Cav.

General Terry (in overall command) had intelligence that there was a large force of non-treaty Lakota Sioux led by Sitting Bull "somewhere" in the vicinity of the Powder River/Tongue River/Little Big Horn country, but no one knew
exactly where they were.

Terry's plan was to catch them in a pincer movement, with additional troops marching in from further west to cut off their retreat in that direction (so there were actually three prongs coming towards the hostiles).

Crook's force made contact with Sitting Bull's warriors before either of the other two "prongs" did, and a major battle - the Battle of the Rosebud - erupted, in which Crook's forces were overwhelmed by the size of the hostile indian camp, and he was forced to retreat.

This was the first indication that anyone had as to the exact size of Sitting Bull's forces. Both Terry and Custer estimated their number at between 800 and 1500 (at most), but their actual number was well over 2000.

Because there was no modern command, control, and communications (C3) in those days, Terry and Custer had no way of knowing that Crook's element had already been overpowered and driven back. (Today, of course, commanders would be passing this battlefield intelligence back and forth in real time).

Crook attempted to send a runner on horseback to link up with Custer's element and warn him, but because of the distance involved (and because the runner may have gotten lost in the wilderness which he was not familiar with), his warning never reached Custer in time.



Wasn't aware of that, thanks for the info...going to do a little more reading about that story now.

Link Posted: 8/31/2011 8:11:51 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2011 8:12:19 AM EDT by Beltfedleadhead]
How fast do you think those bobcats and raccoons were going when they hit that wall?

Link Posted: 8/31/2011 8:14:12 AM EDT


Nicely played.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 8:20:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2011 8:23:09 AM EDT by Shung]
Originally Posted By 6winchester2:
Originally Posted By aimforthemedic:
From the archives (not my photos):

http://media.nara.gov/media/images/43/6/43-0503a.gif
"Brig. Gen. Frank Wheaton, U.S. Army [standing center with white plume in hat], with officers and members of their families, Fort Walla Walla, Wash. Terr., 1874~." 111-SC-83652.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/046.jpg
By lllingworth, 1874, during Black Hills expedition. 77-HQ-264-847.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/049.jpg
"Gen. Crook's headquarters in the field at Whitewood [Dak. Terr.]. On starvation march 1876." Closeup of a camp scene shows tents improvised from wagon frames during the Black Hills expedition. 165-FF-2F-12.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/050.jpg
"Scene of Gen. Custer's last stand, looking in the direction of the ford and the Indian village." A pile of bones on the Little Big Horn battlefield is all that remains, ca. 1877. 111-SC-82966.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/053.jpg
"Execution of a soldier of the 8th Infantry at Prescott, Arizona, 1877." 111-SC-87810
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/057.jpg
Troop`C,' 5th Cavalry, which arrested boomers and squatters prior to opening of Oklahoma, ca. 1888. 111-SC-87369.
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/060.jpg
Officers in tent by fire during the Pine Ridge campaign, 1890––91. 111-SC-104138
http://www.archives.gov/research/american-west/images/062.jpg
"Brig. Gen. Nelson A. Miles and Buffalo Bill viewing hostile Indian camp near Pine Ridge Agency, South Dakota." By Grabill, January 16, 1891. 111-SC-85680.


A note about one of those photographs.

General George Crook played a role in the Battle of the Little Big Horn.

Crook was marching northwards out of Fort Fetterman with a large force of cavalry along with some Crow scouts, at the same time that Custer was marching in a south westerly direction with the 7th Cav.

General Terry (in overall command) had intelligence that there was a large force of non-treaty Lakota Sioux led by Sitting Bull "somewhere" in the vicinity of the Powder River/Tongue River/Little Big Horn country, but no one knew
exactly where they were.

Terry's plan was to catch them in a pincer movement, with additional troops marching in from further west to cut off their retreat in that direction (so there were actually three prongs coming towards the hostiles).

Crook's force made contact with Sitting Bull's warriors before either of the other two "prongs" did, and a major battle - the Battle of the Rosebud - erupted, in which Crook's forces were overwhelmed by the size of the hostile indian camp, and he was forced to retreat.

This was the first indication that anyone had as to the exact size of Sitting Bull's forces. Both Terry and Custer estimated their number at between 800 and 1500 (at most), but their actual number was well over 2000.

Because there was no modern command, control, and communications (C3) in those days, Terry and Custer had no way of knowing that Crook's element had already been overpowered and driven back. (Today, of course, commanders would be passing this battlefield intelligence back and forth in real time).

Crook attempted to send a runner on horseback to link up with Custer's element and warn him, but because of the distance involved (and because the runner may have gotten lost in the wilderness which he was not familiar with), his warning never reached Custer in time.



very good information here.

I still think Custer would have won that day (seizing the camp with non combatants) if Reno held his flank in the woods, keeping a whole lot of warriors busy, and if BENTEEN didnt advance twice slower than he should have by military rules, and if he went to the sound of the battle, as the same rules state he should have been going..

That day, Custer was betrayed by these 2 men... even if his plan wasnt perfect.


Even the the Lakotha warriors admit that Reno could have held inside the woods, and there is no doubt that the support of Benteen would have changed the outcome of the main battle..

Link Posted: 8/31/2011 9:04:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2011 9:14:11 AM EDT by Ssh40]


Food Item: Washtunkala Cast Iron Kettle

Restaurant: The Fort - Morrison, CO

Description: Loaded with buffalo strips: an authentic taste of the Old West

here's the type of food they like to eat in the old west, cooked in an old iron kettle
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 9:17:51 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Ssh40:
http://www.roadfood.com/photos/12542.jpg

Food Item: Washtunkala Cast Iron Kettle

Restaurant: The Fort - Morrison, CO

Description: Loaded with buffalo strips: an authentic taste of the Old West

here's the type of food they like to eat in the old west, cooked in an old iron kettle

Don't know when that pic was taken, but if it was a few years ago there is a good chance I repaired the equipment the kettle of stew was cooked with.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 9:18:54 AM EDT
Still trying to get more info on exact date of this picture. My great-grandpa is the one on the left standing in the cab with the hat on. Department of Forestry, unknown area, probably Angeles Nat'l Forest.


Link Posted: 8/31/2011 9:20:24 AM EDT
tag
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 9:49:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2011 9:51:22 AM EDT by schizrade]
San Francisco:





Gold mining:











Downieville, Ca 1880's





Downieville, Ca 1910



Sierra City, Ca, AC Busch building/Wells Fargo 1906



Forest City, Ca 1880





Virginia City, Nv, late 1860's



Grass Valley, CA 1860's



Sonora, Ca 1860's



Marysville, Ca









Link Posted: 8/31/2011 9:54:02 AM EDT
Tag.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 10:53:41 AM EDT




the Chuck Wagon was the cowboys best friend [meals on wheels]
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 10:54:22 AM EDT
I was all ready to post pics of my house as far back as 1889 until it hit me, I don't live out west.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 10:56:37 AM EDT
I like big buttes.....
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 11:21:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2011 11:22:02 AM EDT by cavscouty]
I'm here for the pics. Former 7th Cav soldier here, and yes, I knew about Comache.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 1:17:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jeep44:
I like big buttes.....

Mining around Sierra Buttes:























The Sierra Buttes mine brass band:


Link Posted: 8/31/2011 1:22:37 PM EDT
Cool pictures.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 1:38:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2011 2:01:34 PM EDT by 30calTBLkid]

I still think Custer would have won that day (seizing the camp with non combatants) if Reno held his flank in the woods, keeping a whole lot of warriors busy, and if BENTEEN didnt advance twice slower than he should have by military rules, and if he went to the sound of the battle, as the same rules state he should have been going..

That day, Custer was betrayed by these 2 men... even if his plan wasnt perfect.


Even the the Lakotha warriors admit that Reno could have held inside the woods, and there is no doubt that the support of Benteen would have changed the outcome of the main battle..



I completely agree. I don't think they were in error, I think Reno was a coward and that Benteen was a chickenshit coward.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 1:41:25 PM EDT
I have nothing to offer, but full of interest.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 1:52:48 PM EDT
Bat



Old West Hanging

Link Posted: 8/31/2011 1:56:21 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Laramie:
Still trying to get more info on exact date of this picture. My great-grandpa is the one on the left standing in the cab with the hat on. Department of Forestry, unknown area, probably Angeles Nat'l Forest.


http://tylerlewis.zenfolio.com/img/v27/p71458891-5.jpg


A guess would be WPA work party that he was incharge of.

Alot could be told by the make and year of the truck, maybe somebody could chime in if they know what it is.
Link Posted: 8/31/2011 2:10:04 PM EDT
The Hanging of Black Jack Ketchum



Judge Roy Bean


Butch Cassidy and The Wild Bunch


Wild Bill Hickok


Buffalo Bill


Link Posted: 8/31/2011 2:45:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2011 3:02:54 PM EDT by 6winchester2]
Originally Posted By 30calTBLkid:

I still think Custer would have won that day (seizing the camp with non combatants) if Reno held his flank in the woods, keeping a whole lot of warriors busy, and if BENTEEN didnt advance twice slower than he should have by military rules, and if he went to the sound of the battle, as the same rules state he should have been going..

That day, Custer was betrayed by these 2 men... even if his plan wasnt perfect.


Even the the Lakotha warriors admit that Reno could have held inside the woods, and there is no doubt that the support of Benteen would have changed the outcome of the main battle..



I completely agree. I don't think they were in error, I think Reno was a coward and that Benteen was a chickenshit coward.


Based on everything I have read on this subject (which is considerable), I agree with the above assessments with one qualifier:

Both Benteen and Reno disliked Custer - and in Benteen's case, it was more like actual hatred.

Reno's initial, spoiling attack against the southern flank of the Lakota position was a disaster, but as noted, Reno could probably have held a fall-back position on the west side of the Little Big Horn if he didn't cut and run.
Reno was drinking heavily that day by the way - which was witnessed by several of his men. Had Reno held a line on the west side of the LBH, it would have taken considerable pressure off of Custer's element when
the latter began his attack. In the event, though, ALL of the Sioux shifted north to meet Custer's advance once Reno had forfeited the field.

As for Benteen, there is almost no doubt that his hatred of Custer influenced his decision not to try and link up with Custer's element and reinforce him.

At the Court of Inquiry that was held in 1878 (if memory serves - thereabouts anyway), Benteen insisted that he had no idea that Custer's element was in trouble further to his north, and that is why he decided to remain where he was, in a defensive position with what was left of Reno's command. Major Reno, BTW, was in such a sorry state by this point that even though Captain Benteen was junior in rank, Benteen pretty much relieved him of command and was making all the decisions.

However, some of Benteen's own soldiers testified that they heard intense gunfire coming from the north, and they all felt that Custer was in trouble and that Benteen should have done something.

Benteen was exonerated by the Court of Inquiry because the Army wanted to sweep the affair under the rug. The Democrats were in control of Congress at the time, and they were debating the military budget, which they wanted to cut to the bone. The Army did not want any embarrassing questions about the cavalry corps being raised by Congress at the time, nor did they want to embarrass higher ranking officers in the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

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