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Posted: 8/6/2005 6:53:26 AM EST
So the tomato plants are ripening....I have to do something wth these dozens of ripe 'maters in my kitchen - so I'm making salsa.

I'm usually partial to a salsa fresca (pico de gallo) with the usual ingredients:
tomato
onion
garlic
jalapeno
­cilantro
lime
and a shot of bitter orange juice (secret ingredient)

anyone have any recipes they'd like to share before I go to the store?
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:56:51 AM EST
Seville oranges? That's what I've used.

I've toyed with the TINIEST bit of olive oil too, some people
don't like that one, but I do.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:57:05 AM EST
Wow. This is a coincidence, we're making salsa here today too.

We are making a big-ass batch of it and canning it (what we always do). We use the basic ingredients in ours:

Tomatoes
Onions
Peppers (jalepeno and bell)
Cilantro (I love lots of cilantro in my salsa)
Some sort of salsa spice mix we buy
A little apple cider vinegar

I always try to make it a little on the 'dry' side, I like more chunks and less juice.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 6:58:34 AM EST
lots of, cilantro...lime....mmmm
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:01:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By gaspain:
lots of, cilantro...lime....mmmm



Lime might be a good idea.... we have a bottle of lime juice.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:03:49 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/6/2005 7:05:17 AM EST by Sniper_Wolfe]
Here are some pics (we'll probably make another 2 batches or so like this throughout the year):







Edit to say: We run all of our vegetables through an old hand crank grinder. I think this is definitely a plus in the system. Cranking the grinder and taste-testing are my jobs.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:08:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/6/2005 7:09:17 AM EST by NoVaGator]

Originally Posted By TexasSIG:
Seville oranges? That's what I've used.

I've toyed with the TINIEST bit of olive oil too, some people
don't like that one, but I do.



I'd use actual seville oranges if I can find them, but I usually get the Goya bottled stuff at the mercado hispano.

I'll add a splash of olive oil and see how that works out

maybe a little bit of scotch bonnet peppers too
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:13:04 AM EST
Made a fresh batch yesterday myself.

I have a tomato press, but only do that with the very small tomatos and cherry tomatos. I mainly slice and dice the rest. Ingredients:

Tomatos
Green peppers
Onions
Cilantro
Garlic
Sa­lt
Jalapeno
Fresh sqeezed lime juice

And my secret ingredient, balsamic vinegar.

Pretty hard to beat.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:16:13 AM EST
Dude, Mango Bean salsa is WAY better than normal salsa. Or you can add some mango into regular salsa. Makes a world of difference. You get a sweet and spicy mix that is just incrediable.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:25:49 AM EST
I HATE cilantro........
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:41:47 AM EST

Originally Posted By Voldermortist:
I HATE cilantro........



Blasphemer!

Link Posted: 8/6/2005 8:13:45 AM EST
Mangos in salsa?


Originally Posted By JH225:
Dude, Mango Bean salsa is WAY better than normal salsa. Or you can add some mango into regular salsa. Makes a world of difference. You get a sweet and spicy mix that is just incrediable.

Link Posted: 8/6/2005 8:22:02 AM EST

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Mangos in salsa?



Yup. Not a true salsa of the tomatoe variety, but an incredibly good variation.

Mango Black Bean Salsa

1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
1 (7 ounce) can whole kernel corn with peppers, drained
1 medium mango, peeled, seeded and cut into 3/4-inch cubes
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon garlic salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

Link Posted: 8/6/2005 8:30:02 AM EST
I like to use serrano peppers along with jalapenos.

I have a real hard time finding decent cilantro around here, it just tastes like lettuce. Even the stuff at the Mexican market doesn't have much flavor.

Where do you guys get your cilantro?
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 8:38:10 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 8:40:32 AM EST
Tag
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 8:42:30 AM EST
Shit, now I want some bad D:!
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 8:43:39 AM EST
try roasting everything off in a little olive oil in the oven-then blend. I'm partial to salsas made with some reconstituted, dried chiles also, particularly chile de arbole-nice and hot. Save some of the reconstituting liquid to add as you blend. plenty of salt and cilantro also.

Link Posted: 8/6/2005 8:46:57 AM EST
One thing I like to do with my salsa so it's not so watery is grill the onions, tomatoes and peppers prior to mixing everything together. Gives the salsa a unique flavor too! Doesn't hurt to throw some mesquite chips in the grille's smoker either while your are grilling your veggies.

If you put some habenaro peppers in your salsa to make it hot, grilling will burn some of the oils in the pepper, thus taking some of the heat away. Be careful to stay out of the smoke too!

It will be a week or two before I can make my salsa. The tomatoes are just coming in now.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 9:22:41 AM EST


Here's my friend Nick (the back of his head), my brother Zach, and my friend Dale (EladEflow on the boards).




This is the best method I have found for getting the watery part out of your salsa. If you do it during the cooking phase, before canning, it's more watery so you can get more off. Keep in mind that it will get thicker once it cools though.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 9:29:29 AM EST

Originally Posted By NoVaGator:
So the tomato plants are ripening....I have to do something wth these dozens of ripe 'maters in my kitchen - so I'm making salsa.

I'm usually partial to a salsa fresca (pico de gallo) with the usual ingredients:
tomato
onion
garlic
jalapeno
­cilantro
lime
and a shot of bitter orange juice (secret ingredient)

anyone have any recipes they'd like to share before I go to the store?





I also use salt, coarse black pepper, and a shot of malt vinegar...
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 9:44:26 AM EST
All this talk of salsa and no Habaneros?
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 9:44:52 AM EST
ok, done with the first bacth....about 2 gallons...

I used habaneros, jalapenos and chipotles

Added olive oil and a dash of balsamic vinegar.

it's "ripening" right now....I'll report back tonight.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 9:46:28 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 9:48:41 AM EST

Originally Posted By az-gunner:
All this talk of salsa and no Habaneros?



I threw 2 habaneros and a red chile in there, I don't like mine that hot.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 10:45:50 AM EST

Originally Posted By az-gunner:
All this talk of salsa and no Habaneros?



Hey! Hey! Hey! See above, I use Habaneros!

I like my salsa hot too. However, I noticed since I'm somewhere over 40 the real hot stuff gives me slight heart burn. Damn, this getting old sucks!
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 12:47:24 PM EST

Originally Posted By Sniper_Wolfe:
www.tenringhosting.com/ViewImage.aspx?PID=03ae5a3c-a091-4dfd-94a7-5165f8b9f03f

Here's my friend Nick (the back of his head), my brother Zach, and my friend Dale (EladEflow on the boards).


www.tenringhosting.com/ViewImage.aspx?PID=39f8c9d5-68bc-460a-93fc-5db3ffc461ac

This is the best method I have found for getting the watery part out of your salsa. If you do it during the cooking phase, before canning, it's more watery so you can get more off. Keep in mind that it will get thicker once it cools though.



Tell Dale his Led Zep shirt is the kewlest!

I like to make my salsa with Roma tomatoes - a little juicier than what you guys who roast are probably ending up with, but not nearly so watery as if you used eating tomatoes like the Beefstake types.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 3:10:56 PM EST

Originally Posted By Henny:

Originally Posted By az-gunner:
All this talk of salsa and no Habaneros?



Hey! Hey! Hey! See above, I use Habaneros!

I like my salsa hot too. However, I noticed since I'm somewhere over 40 the real hot stuff gives me slight heart burn. Damn, this getting old sucks!



Roger that. I didn't see your post, the first time around. All is forgiven.

Carry on.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 3:18:10 PM EST
salsa spice mix? what's in that? seems unnecessary.

Link Posted: 8/6/2005 3:28:12 PM EST
I used jalapenos, a red bell pepper, poblanos, and dried New Mexico chiles in my last homemade batch. Turned out well, except I used white onion. I should have used red or yellow. The white overpowered everything else too much.
Link Posted: 8/6/2005 7:04:02 PM EST
Pico de Gallo is a fresca or "fresh" salsa. None of the ingredients are roasted, toasted, heated or beated.

Onions
Tomatoes (some seed the tomatoes, some don't, I like it with NO seeds)
cilantro
SERRANO chiles A little hotter and a little tastier than jalapenos)

All chopped and mixed together, minimal to no liquid added

but to each his own. most salsas around here at the restaurants are made fresh and few with more than minimal preparation

That said one place I go to makes a great chipotle salsa where all the ingredients are cooked and is very liquidy. By definition chipotles have been smoked and peeled.

Serranos are generally prepared without roasting and peeling. Most larger varieties of peppers get roasted for peeling.



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