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Posted: 5/11/2018 12:26:52 PM EDT
Does anyone use it? Stupid focus aide or actually useful?

I haven't messed around with it or manual focus much to create an opinion, thought I would ask the more knowledgeable here.

Link Posted: 5/11/2018 1:51:14 PM EDT
I would assume since this requires an EVF that this isn't a feature available to DSLRs.
Link Posted: 5/11/2018 2:30:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/11/2018 4:46:59 PM EDT
I hardly ever use Live View (exception is the rare occasion I shoot video) so not much utility for me.
Link Posted: 5/11/2018 4:47:15 PM EDT
I don't find it highly useful for my workflow, but I don't do much video (where I'd probably find it more valuable). My workflow for stills is to zoom the LiveView to 100% on my point of focus and manually focus until sharp. At that magnification, the focus peaking feature is less impressive.

However, for video, the workflow would probably take better advantage of the peaking option.
Link Posted: 5/11/2018 7:24:58 PM EDT
Is live view the same as WYSIWYG-what you see is what you get?
Link Posted: 5/11/2018 8:05:08 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By FredMan:
I hardly ever use Live View (exception is the rare occasion I shoot video) so not much utility for me.
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Originally Posted By FredMan:
I hardly ever use Live View (exception is the rare occasion I shoot video) so not much utility for me.
Same here. I've played around with it, but I'm rarely using lenses on manual to bother with it. Neat if I need it, but I haven't had to yet.

Originally Posted By resteva:
Is live view the same as WYSIWYG-what you see is what you get?
Pretty much, yeah. Through a DSLR viewfinder, you're directly looking through the lens with the aperture wide open (barring a lens with manual or fixed aperture) so you need to rely on your light metering because the view can be brighter or darker depending on the lens, while the photo is different.

Live view is a direct display of what the image sensor sees, so changes will be reflected immediately. Downside is it eats your battery really fast because it's essentially recording video, without writing it to a card.
Link Posted: 5/11/2018 8:09:29 PM EDT
LiveView is similar to WYSIWYG, but may require activation of a button to give you true WYSIWYG versus "enhanced view finder" features. It depends on the camera. Most mirrorless EVFs I've seen default to WYSIWYG. Definitely not so with my D850.
Link Posted: 5/12/2018 9:55:42 PM EDT
Pretty much, yeah. Through a DSLR viewfinder, you're directly looking through the lens with the aperture wide open (barring a lens with manual or fixed aperture) so you need to rely on your light metering because the view can be brighter or darker depending on the lens, while the photo is different.
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I've got my Pv button on the all my bodies that have it (top button on the front, right side next to lens) set to stop down the aperture to whatever it's set for; let's me preview DOF through the viewfinder as well as see how the frame's overall lighting looks.

But I also pay very close attention to the viewfinder meter.
Link Posted: 5/12/2018 10:15:02 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By FredMan:
I've got my Pv button on the all my bodies that have it (top button on the front, right side next to lens) set to stop down the aperture to whatever it's set for; let's me preview DOF through the viewfinder as well as see how the frame's overall lighting looks.

But I also pay very close attention to the viewfinder meter.
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Originally Posted By FredMan:
Pretty much, yeah. Through a DSLR viewfinder, you're directly looking through the lens with the aperture wide open (barring a lens with manual or fixed aperture) so you need to rely on your light metering because the view can be brighter or darker depending on the lens, while the photo is different.
I've got my Pv button on the all my bodies that have it (top button on the front, right side next to lens) set to stop down the aperture to whatever it's set for; let's me preview DOF through the viewfinder as well as see how the frame's overall lighting looks.

But I also pay very close attention to the viewfinder meter.
Dumb question, why don't DSLRs set the lens to the preset/desired aperture even without the shutter button being depressed?
Link Posted: 5/12/2018 10:25:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/12/2018 10:27:33 PM EDT by NorthPolar]
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Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Dumb question, why don't DSLRs set the lens to the preset/desired aperture even without the shutter button being depressed?
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Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Originally Posted By FredMan:
Pretty much, yeah. Through a DSLR viewfinder, you're directly looking through the lens with the aperture wide open (barring a lens with manual or fixed aperture) so you need to rely on your light metering because the view can be brighter or darker depending on the lens, while the photo is different.
I've got my Pv button on the all my bodies that have it (top button on the front, right side next to lens) set to stop down the aperture to whatever it's set for; let's me preview DOF through the viewfinder as well as see how the frame's overall lighting looks.

But I also pay very close attention to the viewfinder meter.
Dumb question, why don't DSLRs set the lens to the preset/desired aperture even without the shutter button being depressed?
More light to the AF sensors, so they can focus faster and more accurately. It only takes a tiny fraction of a second to snap the aperture shut for a photo, so why waste the extra light when you can get performance bonuses from it. Kinda why the pro glass is f/2.8. Super fast because they let in a ton of light in bright environments so they can track AF really fast, but can still let in enough light in darker areas to maximize what the AF can do in crappy light.
Link Posted: 5/13/2018 12:58:09 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/19/2018 12:48:58 AM EDT
I use it when shooting video, or sometimes when I'm shooting in live view. It's a great feature provided by Magic Lantern for the Canon cameras.
Link Posted: 5/21/2018 5:36:34 AM EDT
My camera can do it, but I think it's only when set to a certain manual focus mode. Makes sense, though.

I haven't used it since honestly, I do more video with my camera... but I do have a couple old SLR lenses I can use on it. Peaking should work with fully manual glass.
Link Posted: 5/21/2018 5:42:31 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/21/2018 12:42:08 PM EDT
So I have my camera setup with back button autofocus only, assisted manual focus (zooms in), and high peaking. Shutter button half pressed does nothing.

This way when I'm composing a shot I hit the back button, look for the peaking lines, and I have the option to use the rings on my lenses to manually adjust focus for fine tuning.

I'm liking this setup quite a bit. I am debating using my 2nd custom button to lock the autofocus in place for multiple static shots.
Link Posted: 5/21/2018 12:44:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/21/2018 12:52:45 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
If you're using back button autofocus you shouldn't need to lock in the focus unless your camera does some sort of weird stuff.

Press button - AF is activated

Don't press button - AF is by default not doing anything, so it leaves focus where it is.

At least this is how it works on my Nikon cameras.
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
So I have my camera setup with back button autofocus only, assisted manual focus (zooms in), and high peaking. Shutter button half pressed does nothing.

This way when I'm composing a shot I hit the back button, look for the peaking lines, and I have the option to use the rings on my lenses to manually adjust focus for fine tuning.

I'm liking this setup quite a bit. I am debating using my 2nd custom button to lock the autofocus in place for multiple static shots.
If you're using back button autofocus you shouldn't need to lock in the focus unless your camera does some sort of weird stuff.

Press button - AF is activated

Don't press button - AF is by default not doing anything, so it leaves focus where it is.

At least this is how it works on my Nikon cameras.
I'll have to test this out later, but I think you are correct.
Link Posted: 5/22/2018 4:36:21 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
You are a prime target for why peaking exists.

AF for video generally sucks. Manual focusing + peaking = happy life.
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
Originally Posted By Matthew_Q:
My camera can do it, but I think it's only when set to a certain manual focus mode. Makes sense, though.

I haven't used it since honestly, I do more video with my camera... but I do have a couple old SLR lenses I can use on it. Peaking should work with fully manual glass.
You are a prime target for why peaking exists.

AF for video generally sucks. Manual focusing + peaking = happy life.
Actually a lot of my shooting is "vlog" type shooting. It would not be practical to be in front of the camera, operating it myself, AND try to control focus.

Now, when I do stationary b-roll type stuff, like with the cool rotating panoramic tripod head, manually focusing may be possible or practical... but for most of my video use, I need good AF.
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