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Posted: 12/26/2012 1:37:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/26/2012 1:37:50 PM EST by capnrob97]
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2253170/Inventor-warns-Google-generation-spend-life-screens-losing-creativity-skills.html

"One of Britain's leading inventors has warned that a 'Google generation' who rely on the internet for everything are in danger of becoming 'brain-dead'.

Trevor Baylis, who invented the wind-up radio, said children are losing creativity and practical skills because they spend too much time in front of screens.

The 75-year-old said he fears that the next generation of inventors is being lost, with young people often unable to make anything with their hands."

Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:41:07 PM EST
As someone of the Internet generation, I kind of agree. Most kids these days do have a lack of imagination once they get hooked up.

I'll openly admit I am an information addict and spend too much time online reading and it irritates the hell out of the Missus.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:42:04 PM EST
They already brain dead.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:45:12 PM EST
Originally Posted By helmutlent:
They already brain dead.


Oh Irony, thou art a cruel mistress.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:47:18 PM EST
Hey Mr. Inventor, how good are you at slinging code?

Mmm hmm.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:48:03 PM EST
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:49:20 PM EST
I wonder what they'll call the cognitive equivalent of "American disease".

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:49:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By Keekleberrys:
I donno about that, never before has so much information been at your finger tips.


and so much free good pron!
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:50:59 PM EST
Googlecephaly

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:53:58 PM EST
Yeah, I'm gonna go ahead and disagree.

Never before in human history have we had this much information available and understandable to this many people.

Sounds like the 75-year-old has fallen into the general trap that old folks tend to fall into - that of thinking that their generation and those that came before them are the only good generations and all the "kids" are "ruining it."
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:56:21 PM EST
Nonsense. The majority of all people through out all time have been and will be brain dead.

The minority who aren't brain dead will be enabled by technology and will invent things Mr. Baylis could never imagine.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:58:17 PM EST
I try to counter it by getting the boy to connect the two. His favorite game is minecraft,

In the shop, we have made, from scratch, using scrap metal and a bandsaw( okay I used some old broken hickory handles, but they still had to be reshaped),

A pickaxe, a two bladed battleaxe, an adze?, we cut a small oak and he shaped with a drawknife a bow, and rehandled a 3/4 axe I used for fleshing hides. Now he has replicated his favorite Minecraft tools in real life.

I think we'll be making a sword soon......

Gotta work at it.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 1:58:48 PM EST
Al Gore said this?
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:01:42 PM EST
Originally Posted By PR361:
I try to counter it by getting the boy to connect the two. His favorite game is minecraft,

In the shop, we have made, from scratch, using scrap metal and a bandsaw( okay I used some old broken hickory handles, but they still had to be reshaped),

A pickaxe, a two bladed battleaxe, an adze?, we cut a small oak and he shaped with a drawknife a bow, and rehandled a 3/4 axe I used for fleshing hides. Now he has replicated his favorite Minecraft tools in real life.

I think we'll be making a sword soon......

Gotta work at it.


adze, and good on your dad that is pretty bad ass!
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:01:45 PM EST
If it wasn't for the internet, I wouldn't have gotten my hands on Army Research Lab papers and other documents.



I've got quite a bit on terminal ballistics, armor composition and fabrication, and an in-depth look into the creation of carbon nanotubes. Among others...
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:02:58 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/26/2012 2:03:50 PM EST by Yossarian]
I thought you meant Al Gore was giving the warning.

ETA: shoulda scrolled down first...Van got me.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:04:23 PM EST

Originally Posted By Subnet:
Hey Mr. Inventor, how good are you at slinging code?

Mmm hmm.


Programmers are not the norm, bur rather the exception.


How many NEW movie plots have come out of Hollywood in the last twenty years, as opposed to the previous twenty years. Everything today is a remake.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:04:49 PM EST
Hey Mr Inventor.

Point your Googles at instructables.com, etsy.com, or even pinterest.com. Go to youtube and look up some of the crazy instruments kids built from PVC pipes, the LEGO robots, and numerous other inventions on there.

The interwebs are full of people being creative and sharing that creativity and knowledge with others.

Anyone that can't build something with their hands, probably doesn't want to.

Don't blame the internet.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:08:58 PM EST
i bet the generation before him said the same thing about electricity.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:11:37 PM EST
Originally Posted By LowBeta:
Googlecephaly

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


Yep. When you can Google anything at anytime why bother learning anything?
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:14:15 PM EST
I lost my mind when I started creating graphics using ANSI for BBS systems...

Especially the animated ones...
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:14:17 PM EST
Originally Posted By Subnet:
Hey Mr. Inventor, how good are you at slinging code?

Mmm hmm.


Good point.

He has a point too though -- instead of learning how to solve problems, today's generation simply jumps on google and finds out how somebody else did it. That's not a bad thing at all -- but what is bad is that then they never gain the skill of figuring it out themselves.

I grew up in pretty much the same generation you did, IIRC, so we probably have some of the same experiences -- we learned how to "do" computers back when Google didn't exist, we had to "figure it out" for ourselves, so we've got that troubleshooting background that many of today's computer nerds don't have, and I would venture to say *most* of today's kids don't have.

Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:14:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By cavedog:

Originally Posted By Subnet:
Hey Mr. Inventor, how good are you at slinging code?

Mmm hmm.


Programmers are not the norm, bur rather the exception.


How many NEW movie plots have come out of Hollywood in the last twenty years, as opposed to the previous twenty years. Everything today is a remake.


Its not for a lack of ideas or creativity. Its the fact movies are so fucking expensive and remakes are easier to estimate returns. They are safer bets.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:15:31 PM EST

Originally Posted By Josh:
Originally Posted By Subnet:
Hey Mr. Inventor, how good are you at slinging code?

Mmm hmm.


Good point.

He has a point too though -- instead of learning how to solve problems, today's generation simply jumps on google and finds out how somebody else did it. That's not a bad thing at all -- but what is bad is that then they never gain the skill of figuring it out themselves.

I grew up in pretty much the same generation you did, IIRC, so we probably have some of the same experiences -- we learned how to "do" computers back when Google didn't exist, we had to "figure it out" for ourselves, so we've got that troubleshooting background that many of today's computer nerds don't have, and I would venture to say *most* of today's kids don't have.


A fair point.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:16:20 PM EST
The internet has taught me to reload ammunition, build an ar-15, build a savage precision rifle, cook numerous dishes, brew beer, harden and temper steel, build a computer, etc, etc.

Suffice it to say I disagree.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:16:43 PM EST
Yes and no...

Losing practical skills and traditional crafts yes.

But.

Those are being replaced by the new skills. If you can program... you are like a blacksmith of old. You can get an idea and just make it... and then sell it. That is making something... just not "with your hands." If you've got the idea and the skill then you can make millions.

Modern technology is not made by hand. Even older tech ... like furniture isn't made mostly by hand anymore. Everything is cut... shaped... put together to some extent... by computer controlled robots. The future for inventors is in writing the code that runs those robots and in making the designs that get fed into them.

Modern tech is made working at scales so small you can't do it by hand. CPUs are made by depositing layers a few atoms thick at a time. The layout of it gets designed on a computer and then given to the manufacturing computers to create.

So to him I say... You're wrong. You just don't understand how things are made now.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:18:02 PM EST
Originally Posted By Fat_McNasty:
Originally Posted By Keekleberrys:
I donno about that, never before has so much information been at your finger tips.


and so much free good pron!



two very correct answers
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:19:27 PM EST
What's it doing to us? Maybe we are the zombies we've been preparing for....
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:19:57 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/26/2012 2:22:03 PM EST by Ohio]
Originally Posted By Keekleberrys:
I donno about that, never before has so much information been at your finger tips.


And none of it in their brain, or understood and digested.


ETA:
Ask a kid what the capital of Spain is, or the formula for the circumference of a circle.
They pull out their damned phones.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:21:20 PM EST

Originally Posted By kcolg30:
I lost my mind when I started creating graphics using ANSI for BBS systems...

Especially the animated ones...

It was the modem init string that pushed me over the edge.

Trying to get ymodem, xmodem and zmodem to work, along with DOORS.SYS and callback verification.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:23:44 PM EST
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By Josh:
Originally Posted By Subnet:
Hey Mr. Inventor, how good are you at slinging code?

Mmm hmm.


Good point.

He has a point too though –– instead of learning how to solve problems, today's generation simply jumps on google and finds out how somebody else did it. That's not a bad thing at all –– but what is bad is that then they never gain the skill of figuring it out themselves.

I grew up in pretty much the same generation you did, IIRC, so we probably have some of the same experiences –– we learned how to "do" computers back when Google didn't exist, we had to "figure it out" for ourselves, so we've got that troubleshooting background that many of today's computer nerds don't have, and I would venture to say *most* of today's kids don't have.


A fair point.


Before the internet people did the same thing. "Google" was called "the library." I know because I used to go there before Google. You think Michael Faraday wasn't reading "Proceedings of the Royal Society?"

Damn near nothing is woven from whole cloth.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:27:03 PM EST
Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
Originally Posted By PR361:
I try to counter it by getting the boy to connect the two. His favorite game is minecraft,

In the shop, we have made, from scratch, using scrap metal and a bandsaw( okay I used some old broken hickory handles, but they still had to be reshaped),

A pickaxe, a two bladed battleaxe, an adze?, we cut a small oak and he shaped with a drawknife a bow, and rehandled a 3/4 axe I used for fleshing hides. Now he has replicated his favorite Minecraft tools in real life.

I think we'll be making a sword soon......

Gotta work at it.


adze, and good on your dad that is pretty bad ass!


A liberal description

The copies are, shall we say, "rudimentary"?

The point is, we're getting the boy to use his hands, and see the internet as a gateway to real things, not an end to itself.....

Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:28:14 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/26/2012 2:31:35 PM EST by Winn]
Originally Posted By andrasik:

Yeah, I'm gonna go ahead and disagree.

Never before in human history have we had this much information available and understandable to this many people.

Sounds like the 75-year-old has fallen into the general trap that old folks tend to fall into - that of thinking that their generation and those that came before them are the only good generations and all the "kids" are "ruining it."


But the guy's point is about the loss of creativity and the development (or lack thereof) of practical skills. The simple fact that information is widely available doesn't automatically promote either of those.

Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:28:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By cavedog:

Originally Posted By kcolg30:
I lost my mind when I started creating graphics using ANSI for BBS systems...

Especially the animated ones...

It was the modem init string that pushed me over the edge.

Trying to get ymodem, xmodem and zmodem to work, along with DOORS.SYS and callback verification.

Dip switches on my Hayes 1200 BPS drove me crazy...

Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:29:35 PM EST

Originally Posted By BobRoberts:
Originally Posted By cavedog:

Originally Posted By Subnet:
Hey Mr. Inventor, how good are you at slinging code?

Mmm hmm.


Programmers are not the norm, bur rather the exception.


How many NEW movie plots have come out of Hollywood in the last twenty years, as opposed to the previous twenty years. Everything today is a remake.


Its not for a lack of ideas or creativity. Its the fact movies are so fucking expensive and remakes are easier to estimate returns. They are safer bets.

I can accept that for part of it, but there are too many remakes, some of the originals being bad movies to begin with, to cover all of that.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:30:05 PM EST
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By Subnet:

Originally Posted By Josh:
Originally Posted By Subnet:
Hey Mr. Inventor, how good are you at slinging code?

Mmm hmm.


Good point.

He has a point too though –– instead of learning how to solve problems, today's generation simply jumps on google and finds out how somebody else did it. That's not a bad thing at all –– but what is bad is that then they never gain the skill of figuring it out themselves.

I grew up in pretty much the same generation you did, IIRC, so we probably have some of the same experiences –– we learned how to "do" computers back when Google didn't exist, we had to "figure it out" for ourselves, so we've got that troubleshooting background that many of today's computer nerds don't have, and I would venture to say *most* of today's kids don't have.


A fair point.


Before the internet people did the same thing. "Google" was called "the library." I know because I used to go there before Google. You think Michael Faraday wasn't reading "Proceedings of the Royal Society?"

Damn near nothing is woven from whole cloth.


Yes and no. I've been in a lot of libraries (the KU library is truly an amazing thing, I used to spend hours and hours deep in the stacks), and none of them had the depth or breadth of information available at my fingertips on my phone today.

One of the key differences is that most of the information in the books in the library requires you to think to apply it to what you're doing. Frequently (and I see this in myself as well sometimes), I can type an error code or message into google, and instantly get back a complete description of the problem, what caused it, and what fifty people did to fix it in the last 24 hours, complete with links to download scripts, files to copy or modify, etc, etc, etc. I used to learn a great deal more from a problem than I do now, but I can solve a problem faster now because of the amazing speed at which information has become available to me.

Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:30:28 PM EST
Originally Posted By Winn:
Originally Posted By andrasik:

Yeah, I'm gonna go ahead and disagree.

Never before in human history have we had this much information available and understandable to this many people.

Sounds like the 75-year-old has fallen into the general trap that old folks tend to fall into - that of thinking that their generation and those that came before them are the only good generations and all the "kids" are "ruining it."


But the guy's point is about creativity and the development of practical skills. The fact that information is widely available doesn't automatically promote either of those..



I disagree wholeheartedly.

That information is everywhere, being seen by many, and many are thinking: "Hmm, I bet I could make that better" or "Hmm, what happens if I did this instead of that" etc etc. That much information is inspirational to the creative.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:30:34 PM EST

Originally Posted By AR4U:
The internet has taught me to reload ammunition, build an ar-15, build a savage precision rifle, cook numerous dishes, brew beer, harden and temper steel, build a computer, etc, etc.

Suffice it to say I disagree.


Do you have that knowledge on your wall, or do you need to go to the internet every time you have to check something?

Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:32:22 PM EST
I dissagree. The internet is a great tool and source of information. And free high def porn.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:33:03 PM EST

Originally Posted By Master_of_Orion:
Yes and no...

Losing practical skills and traditional crafts yes.

But.

Those are being replaced by the new skills. If you can program... you are like a blacksmith of old. You can get an idea and just make it... and then sell it. That is making something... just not "with your hands." If you've got the idea and the skill then you can make millions.

Modern technology is not made by hand. Even older tech ... like furniture isn't made mostly by hand anymore. Everything is cut... shaped... put together to some extent... by computer controlled robots. The future for inventors is in writing the code that runs those robots and in making the designs that get fed into them.

Modern tech is made working at scales so small you can't do it by hand. CPUs are made by depositing layers a few atoms thick at a time. The layout of it gets designed on a computer and then given to the manufacturing computers to create.

So to him I say... You're wrong. You just don't understand how things are made now.

Sure we are more high tech, but what is the percentage of the population that is involved in the production of that high tech?

Sadly, the vast bulk of people are mindless consumers, and getting dumber every year. We are losing our critical thinking skills.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:36:29 PM EST

Originally Posted By Keekleberrys:
I donno about that, never before has so much information been at your finger tips.


And instead they are using it for pr0n, Twitter and Facebook.


THANK GOD the internet wasn't available when I was a kid. I would have had a serious case of tennis elbow and probably arrested for blowing a LOT of shit.


Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:37:45 PM EST
Originally Posted By cavedog:

Originally Posted By Master_of_Orion:
Yes and no...

Losing practical skills and traditional crafts yes.

But.

Those are being replaced by the new skills. If you can program... you are like a blacksmith of old. You can get an idea and just make it... and then sell it. That is making something... just not "with your hands." If you've got the idea and the skill then you can make millions.

Modern technology is not made by hand. Even older tech ... like furniture isn't made mostly by hand anymore. Everything is cut... shaped... put together to some extent... by computer controlled robots. The future for inventors is in writing the code that runs those robots and in making the designs that get fed into them.

Modern tech is made working at scales so small you can't do it by hand. CPUs are made by depositing layers a few atoms thick at a time. The layout of it gets designed on a computer and then given to the manufacturing computers to create.

So to him I say... You're wrong. You just don't understand how things are made now.

Sure we are more high tech, but what is the percentage of the population that is involved in the production of that high tech?

Sadly, the vast bulk of people are mindless consumers, and getting dumber every year. We are losing our critical thinking skills.


That's a very accurate assessment IMHO. I see it even here, where people are frequently too lazy to google for the answer to a very simple question. lmgtfy is a wonderful resource...
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:42:09 PM EST
Originally Posted By cavedog:

Originally Posted By AR4U:
The internet has taught me to reload ammunition, build an ar-15, build a savage precision rifle, cook numerous dishes, brew beer, harden and temper steel, build a computer, etc, etc.

Suffice it to say I disagree.


Do you have that knowledge on your wall, or do you need to go to the internet every time you have to check something?



Well, I have reloading manuals and logs, shooting logs, cook books, brewing logs, notes on heat treatment, etc. Some things I remember, some things I've written down, and somethings I look up on the internet. There's no fundamental difference between looking something up on page 46 of your Speer manual and looking something up on the Speer website.

I'm sure the old timer, "It was better back then types" will be along shortly to point out that they remember the trim length for the chamber on their custom .220 swift and can recall the temperature/velocity variation of a particular load while walking to the target line, in the snow, uphill, both ways.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:43:24 PM EST
Originally Posted By andrasik:
Originally Posted By Winn:
Originally Posted By andrasik:

Yeah, I'm gonna go ahead and disagree.

Never before in human history have we had this much information available and understandable to this many people.

Sounds like the 75-year-old has fallen into the general trap that old folks tend to fall into - that of thinking that their generation and those that came before them are the only good generations and all the "kids" are "ruining it."


But the guy's point is about creativity and the development of practical skills. The fact that information is widely available doesn't automatically promote either of those..



I disagree wholeheartedly.

That information is everywhere, being seen by many, and many are thinking: "Hmm, I bet I could make that better" or "Hmm, what happens if I did this instead of that" etc etc. That much information is inspirational to the creative.


That's purely speculation.

Voluminous amounts of information may be "inspirational" to *some* people, but a much safer bet is that for the vast majority of people it simply means that there's a greater opportunity to get questions answered more quickly and easily - without any real effort on their part.

Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:45:00 PM EST
Originally Posted By broken_reticle:

Originally Posted By Keekleberrys:
I donno about that, never before has so much information been at your finger tips.


And instead they are using it for pr0n, Twitter and Facebook.


THANK GOD the internet wasn't available when I was a kid. I would have had a serious case of tennis elbow and probably arrested for blowing a LOT of shit.




Blowing a lot of...what...
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:46:01 PM EST
Originally Posted By Josh:
Originally Posted By cavedog:

Originally Posted By Master_of_Orion:
Yes and no...

Losing practical skills and traditional crafts yes.

But.

Those are being replaced by the new skills. If you can program... you are like a blacksmith of old. You can get an idea and just make it... and then sell it. That is making something... just not "with your hands." If you've got the idea and the skill then you can make millions.

Modern technology is not made by hand. Even older tech ... like furniture isn't made mostly by hand anymore. Everything is cut... shaped... put together to some extent... by computer controlled robots. The future for inventors is in writing the code that runs those robots and in making the designs that get fed into them.

Modern tech is made working at scales so small you can't do it by hand. CPUs are made by depositing layers a few atoms thick at a time. The layout of it gets designed on a computer and then given to the manufacturing computers to create.

So to him I say... You're wrong. You just don't understand how things are made now.

Sure we are more high tech, but what is the percentage of the population that is involved in the production of that high tech?

Sadly, the vast bulk of people are mindless consumers, and getting dumber every year. We are losing our critical thinking skills.


That's a very accurate assessment IMHO. I see it even here, where people are frequently too lazy to google for the answer to a very simple question. lmgtfy is a wonderful resource...


I assure you there where inept and dull people before the internet. There were also lazy ones, but I would argue we encourage that these days not with the internet, but by incentivizing laziness.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:47:14 PM EST

Originally Posted By Winn:
Originally Posted By andrasik:
Originally Posted By Winn:
Originally Posted By andrasik:

Yeah, I'm gonna go ahead and disagree.

Never before in human history have we had this much information available and understandable to this many people.

Sounds like the 75-year-old has fallen into the general trap that old folks tend to fall into - that of thinking that their generation and those that came before them are the only good generations and all the "kids" are "ruining it."


But the guy's point is about creativity and the development of practical skills. The fact that information is widely available doesn't automatically promote either of those..



I disagree wholeheartedly.

That information is everywhere, being seen by many, and many are thinking: "Hmm, I bet I could make that better" or "Hmm, what happens if I did this instead of that" etc etc. That much information is inspirational to the creative.


That's purely speculation.

Voluminous amounts of information may be "inspirational" to *some* people, but a much safer bet is that for the vast majority of people it simply means that there's a greater opportunity to get questions answered more quickly and easily - without any real effort on their part.



I work in computer networking and security. About 6-7 years ago a cousin of mine, about to graduate high school, told me he wanted to become a professional hacker. He asked me where to start, I suggested he start by learning Perl. He took two seconds to look through the book and asked "Can't I just download a program or something?"


Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:50:25 PM EST
Originally Posted By broken_reticle:

Originally Posted By Winn:
Originally Posted By andrasik:
Originally Posted By Winn:
Originally Posted By andrasik:

Yeah, I'm gonna go ahead and disagree.

Never before in human history have we had this much information available and understandable to this many people.

Sounds like the 75-year-old has fallen into the general trap that old folks tend to fall into - that of thinking that their generation and those that came before them are the only good generations and all the "kids" are "ruining it."


But the guy's point is about creativity and the development of practical skills. The fact that information is widely available doesn't automatically promote either of those..



I disagree wholeheartedly.

That information is everywhere, being seen by many, and many are thinking: "Hmm, I bet I could make that better" or "Hmm, what happens if I did this instead of that" etc etc. That much information is inspirational to the creative.


That's purely speculation.

Voluminous amounts of information may be "inspirational" to *some* people, but a much safer bet is that for the vast majority of people it simply means that there's a greater opportunity to get questions answered more quickly and easily - without any real effort on their part.



I work in computer networking and security. About 6-7 years ago a cousin of mine, about to graduate high school, told me he wanted to become a professional hacker. He asked me where to start, I suggested he start by learning Perl. He took two seconds to look through the book and asked "Can't I just download a program or something?"




Everybody hates PERL. I agree with the comment though -- people are lazy.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:51:10 PM EST
Originally Posted By AR4U:
Originally Posted By Josh:
Originally Posted By cavedog:

Originally Posted By Master_of_Orion:
Yes and no...

Losing practical skills and traditional crafts yes.

But.

Those are being replaced by the new skills. If you can program... you are like a blacksmith of old. You can get an idea and just make it... and then sell it. That is making something... just not "with your hands." If you've got the idea and the skill then you can make millions.

Modern technology is not made by hand. Even older tech ... like furniture isn't made mostly by hand anymore. Everything is cut... shaped... put together to some extent... by computer controlled robots. The future for inventors is in writing the code that runs those robots and in making the designs that get fed into them.

Modern tech is made working at scales so small you can't do it by hand. CPUs are made by depositing layers a few atoms thick at a time. The layout of it gets designed on a computer and then given to the manufacturing computers to create.

So to him I say... You're wrong. You just don't understand how things are made now.

Sure we are more high tech, but what is the percentage of the population that is involved in the production of that high tech?

Sadly, the vast bulk of people are mindless consumers, and getting dumber every year. We are losing our critical thinking skills.


That's a very accurate assessment IMHO. I see it even here, where people are frequently too lazy to google for the answer to a very simple question. lmgtfy is a wonderful resource...


I assure you there where inept and dull people before the internet. There were also lazy ones, but I would argue we encourage that these days not with the internet, but by incentivizing laziness.


The two aren't really mutually exclusive.
Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:51:58 PM EST

Originally Posted By Josh:
Originally Posted By broken_reticle:

I work in computer networking and security. About 6-7 years ago a cousin of mine, about to graduate high school, told me he wanted to become a professional hacker. He asked me where to start, I suggested he start by learning Perl. He took two seconds to look through the book and asked "Can't I just download a program or something?"




Everybody hates PERL. I agree with the comment though -- people are lazy.

How the hell could anyone hate Perl? Java,VB, now those are things to strongly dislike. I reserve the hate for COBOL.


Link Posted: 12/26/2012 2:56:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By cavedog:

Originally Posted By Master_of_Orion:
Yes and no...

Losing practical skills and traditional crafts yes.

But.

Those are being replaced by the new skills. If you can program... you are like a blacksmith of old. You can get an idea and just make it... and then sell it. That is making something... just not "with your hands." If you've got the idea and the skill then you can make millions.

Modern technology is not made by hand. Even older tech ... like furniture isn't made mostly by hand anymore. Everything is cut... shaped... put together to some extent... by computer controlled robots. The future for inventors is in writing the code that runs those robots and in making the designs that get fed into them.

Modern tech is made working at scales so small you can't do it by hand. CPUs are made by depositing layers a few atoms thick at a time. The layout of it gets designed on a computer and then given to the manufacturing computers to create.

So to him I say... You're wrong. You just don't understand how things are made now.

Sure we are more high tech, but what is the percentage of the population that is involved in the production of that high tech?

Sadly, the vast bulk of people are mindless consumers, and getting dumber every year. We are losing our critical thinking skills.
The progression of technology works to free people from work and give them time for thought. Now a percent will choose not to think... but that is not the fault of the technology.

Humans with no Tech... hunter gathers who didn't have time to think and invent.
Humans with farming... a smaller percent of the people feed the rest so they can think and invent more stuff.
... and so on
The higher tech we get the less people are needed to do mindless repetitive tasks. Then they can choose to do the mindless thing or choose to better themselves.

The internet and other such technology are not the cause of what you or the guy in the article are complaining about any more than guns cause violence.

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