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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 1/19/2015 7:29:26 PM EST
What settings are you using on handbrake for DVDs to get a decent 720p quality? I've been playing around and not sure whether I've gotten to the point where I will call it good. I realize DVDs aren't going to give the best quality. Right now I'm using 2500kbps with 2 pass encoding and turbo first pass. I've been keeping the other settings at auto pretty much. Also using web optimized for better Plex playback. Any suggestions?
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:30:26 PM EST
In before op sent to the corner
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:33:12 PM EST
I can't help you with handbrake. I can't be sure you are using your own DVD's, and helping you might be considered illegal and put my account in jeopardy.

However Plex server will encode on the fly. Leave your source alone and let plex server do the work.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:33:47 PM EST
I use my handbrake so the car does not roll away
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:36:21 PM EST
Has ARF gone full retard? I am talking about putting my legally owned DVDs into digital format FFS
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:37:02 PM EST
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Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Has ARF gone full retard? I am talking about putting my legally owned DVDs into digital format FFS
View Quote


Illegal.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1707916_Posting_about_watching_stolen_movies_on_torrent_sites_is_not_okay_.html
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:37:22 PM EST
I've been ripping my DVDs for years now. I started my collection in high school as soon as DVDs became popular and just kept buying here and there. Movies and TV shows.

I have compared straight mkv rips to handbrake using the "high profile" preset and honestly there's not a whole ton of difference.

On top of that, depending on the movie itself, quality of various DVDs varies a lot. If you really want the best quality, I would think a straight .mkv rip of the movie would yield the highest quality but you're getting into 3-7 gigs per rip vs. 1-1.5 gigs when encoded in handbrake.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:37:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/19/2015 7:42:34 PM EST by Rugerlvr]
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Originally Posted By hondaciv:
I can't help you with handbrake. I can't be sure you are using your own DVD's, and helping you might be considered illegal and put my account in jeopardy.

However Plex server will encode on the fly. Leave your source alone and let plex server do the work.
View Quote

The plex server on my QNAP NAS does not transcode on the fly. I had this exact question the other day, and am still looking for an answer myself. Stuff I shot on my old flip video won't even play on my Roku.

ETA: let me rephrase, what format does Plex like, that plays nice with the Plex client on Roku?
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:37:55 PM EST
I don't do 720p, but I suspect the high Rez preset should work. I use the normal and Plex on roku can do pass through without transcoding.

Also look for hand break batch. Encode multiple files with same preset just walk away
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:40:40 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Laramie:
I've been ripping my DVDs for years now. I started my collection in high school as soon as DVDs became popular and just kept buying here and there. Movies and TV shows.

I have compared straight mkv rips to handbrake using the "high profile" preset and honestly there's not a whole ton of difference.

On top of that, depending on the movie itself, quality of various DVDs varies a lot. If you really want the best quality, I would think a straight .mkv rip of the movie would yield the highest quality but you're getting into 3-7 gigs per rip vs. 1-1.5 gigs when encoded in handbrake.
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What do you mean by straight mkv rip? Through handbrake or something else?
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:41:42 PM EST
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Originally Posted By poeman:
I don't do 720p, but I suspect the high Rez preset should work. I use the normal and Plex on roku can do pass through without transcoding.

Also look for hand break batch. Encode multiple files with same preset just walk away
View Quote


Yeah I really need to do that. I guess you just iso the DVD first?
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:44:17 PM EST
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Originally Posted By MrHiggs:


What do you mean by straight mkv rip? Through handbrake or something else?
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Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Originally Posted By Laramie:
I've been ripping my DVDs for years now. I started my collection in high school as soon as DVDs became popular and just kept buying here and there. Movies and TV shows.

I have compared straight mkv rips to handbrake using the "high profile" preset and honestly there's not a whole ton of difference.

On top of that, depending on the movie itself, quality of various DVDs varies a lot. If you really want the best quality, I would think a straight .mkv rip of the movie would yield the highest quality but you're getting into 3-7 gigs per rip vs. 1-1.5 gigs when encoded in handbrake.


What do you mean by straight mkv rip? Through handbrake or something else?


MakeMKV. It scans the DVD and you can chose to rip everything including subtitles, all audio tracks, etc. It's a whole disc rip without any compression/encoding. Handbrake has to rip the DVD and encode on the fly. I rip the .mkv then rip to .m4v in handbrake because I mostly use AppleTV and apple doesn't recognize .mkv, but I'm sure plex does along with VLC on your computer.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:46:54 PM EST
Not sure on DVD - I do amateur video production for small clients (dance recital, small non profits, etc.)
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:48:30 PM EST
I
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Laramie:


MakeMKV. It scans the DVD and you can chose to rip everything including subtitles, all audio tracks, etc. It's a whole disc rip without any compression/encoding. Handbrake has to rip the DVD and encode on the fly. I rip the .mkv then rip to .m4v in handbrake because I mostly use AppleTV and apple doesn't recognize .mkv, but I'm sure plex does along with VLC on your computer.
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Originally Posted By Laramie:
Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Originally Posted By Laramie:
I've been ripping my DVDs for years now. I started my collection in high school as soon as DVDs became popular and just kept buying here and there. Movies and TV shows.

I have compared straight mkv rips to handbrake using the "high profile" preset and honestly there's not a whole ton of difference.

On top of that, depending on the movie itself, quality of various DVDs varies a lot. If you really want the best quality, I would think a straight .mkv rip of the movie would yield the highest quality but you're getting into 3-7 gigs per rip vs. 1-1.5 gigs when encoded in handbrake.


What do you mean by straight mkv rip? Through handbrake or something else?


MakeMKV. It scans the DVD and you can chose to rip everything including subtitles, all audio tracks, etc. It's a whole disc rip without any compression/encoding. Handbrake has to rip the DVD and encode on the fly. I rip the .mkv then rip to .m4v in handbrake because I mostly use AppleTV and apple doesn't recognize .mkv, but I'm sure plex does along with VLC on your computer.


What kind of file size do you end with on a 2hr movie?
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 7:54:26 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Ohiogators:
I

What kind of file size do you end with on a 2hr movie?
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Originally Posted By Ohiogators:
I
Originally Posted By Laramie:
Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Originally Posted By Laramie:
I've been ripping my DVDs for years now. I started my collection in high school as soon as DVDs became popular and just kept buying here and there. Movies and TV shows.

I have compared straight mkv rips to handbrake using the "high profile" preset and honestly there's not a whole ton of difference.

On top of that, depending on the movie itself, quality of various DVDs varies a lot. If you really want the best quality, I would think a straight .mkv rip of the movie would yield the highest quality but you're getting into 3-7 gigs per rip vs. 1-1.5 gigs when encoded in handbrake.


What do you mean by straight mkv rip? Through handbrake or something else?


MakeMKV. It scans the DVD and you can chose to rip everything including subtitles, all audio tracks, etc. It's a whole disc rip without any compression/encoding. Handbrake has to rip the DVD and encode on the fly. I rip the .mkv then rip to .m4v in handbrake because I mostly use AppleTV and apple doesn't recognize .mkv, but I'm sure plex does along with VLC on your computer.


What kind of file size do you end with on a 2hr movie?



On a full DVD rip or encoded with handbrake? Each DVD is different. Not exactly sure how it translates but newer movies that are shot digitally or with heavy special effects take up more space. But a 2 hour movies is anywhere from 1 to 1.5gigs with handbrake on the "high profile" preset. A full rip from MakeMKV is 5 to 6gigs.

Older movies that are poor quality are much smaller in size when ripped/encoded.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 8:06:30 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Laramie:



On a full DVD rip or encoded with handbrake? Each DVD is different. Not exactly sure how it translates but newer movies that are shot digitally or with heavy special effects take up more space. But a 2 hour movies is anywhere from 1 to 1.5gigs with handbrake on the "high profile" preset. A full rip from MakeMKV is 5 to 6gigs.

Older movies that are poor quality are much smaller in size when ripped/encoded.
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Originally Posted By Laramie:
Originally Posted By Ohiogators:
I
Originally Posted By Laramie:
Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Originally Posted By Laramie:
I've been ripping my DVDs for years now. I started my collection in high school as soon as DVDs became popular and just kept buying here and there. Movies and TV shows.

I have compared straight mkv rips to handbrake using the "high profile" preset and honestly there's not a whole ton of difference.

On top of that, depending on the movie itself, quality of various DVDs varies a lot. If you really want the best quality, I would think a straight .mkv rip of the movie would yield the highest quality but you're getting into 3-7 gigs per rip vs. 1-1.5 gigs when encoded in handbrake.


What do you mean by straight mkv rip? Through handbrake or something else?


MakeMKV. It scans the DVD and you can chose to rip everything including subtitles, all audio tracks, etc. It's a whole disc rip without any compression/encoding. Handbrake has to rip the DVD and encode on the fly. I rip the .mkv then rip to .m4v in handbrake because I mostly use AppleTV and apple doesn't recognize .mkv, but I'm sure plex does along with VLC on your computer.


What kind of file size do you end with on a 2hr movie?



On a full DVD rip or encoded with handbrake? Each DVD is different. Not exactly sure how it translates but newer movies that are shot digitally or with heavy special effects take up more space. But a 2 hour movies is anywhere from 1 to 1.5gigs with handbrake on the "high profile" preset. A full rip from MakeMKV is 5 to 6gigs.

Older movies that are poor quality are much smaller in size when ripped/encoded.


Interesting...not sure I have the space for that right now, but it might give a try to compare quality.

On a side note, anyone use Plex to stream from a network mounted drive?
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 8:24:10 PM EST
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Originally Posted By MrHiggs:


Interesting...not sure I have the space for that right now, but it might give a try to compare quality.

On a side note, anyone use Plex to stream from a network mounted drive?
View Quote



Yeah full rips will take up a lot more space obviously. I only keep them long enough to encode with handbrake then I delete them. Like I said, I tested quality side by side and to me there wasn't a huge difference. I've been toying with the idea of getting a blu-ray drive so I could rip the blu-ray movies I have. Obviously there the size would be worth it because the quality difference compared to dvd would be so much better.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 8:46:02 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Laramie:



Yeah full rips will take up a lot more space obviously. I only keep them long enough to encode with handbrake then I delete them. Like I said, I tested quality side by side and to me there wasn't a huge difference. I've been toying with the idea of getting a blu-ray drive so I could rip the blu-ray movies I have. Obviously there the size would be worth it because the quality difference compared to dvd would be so much better.
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Originally Posted By Laramie:
Originally Posted By MrHiggs:


Interesting...not sure I have the space for that right now, but it might give a try to compare quality.

On a side note, anyone use Plex to stream from a network mounted drive?



Yeah full rips will take up a lot more space obviously. I only keep them long enough to encode with handbrake then I delete them. Like I said, I tested quality side by side and to me there wasn't a huge difference. I've been toying with the idea of getting a blu-ray drive so I could rip the blu-ray movies I have. Obviously there the size would be worth it because the quality difference compared to dvd would be so much better.


Yeah. Any reason you don't just make an iso?
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 8:51:14 PM EST
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Originally Posted By MrHiggs:


Yeah. Any reason you don't just make an iso?
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Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Originally Posted By Laramie:
Originally Posted By MrHiggs:


Interesting...not sure I have the space for that right now, but it might give a try to compare quality.

On a side note, anyone use Plex to stream from a network mounted drive?



Yeah full rips will take up a lot more space obviously. I only keep them long enough to encode with handbrake then I delete them. Like I said, I tested quality side by side and to me there wasn't a huge difference. I've been toying with the idea of getting a blu-ray drive so I could rip the blu-ray movies I have. Obviously there the size would be worth it because the quality difference compared to dvd would be so much better.


Yeah. Any reason you don't just make an iso?



For what purpose? Before I found makemkv others programs I used years ago dealt with ISOs but now the MKV is playable through VLC, so I can check the rip, make sure any foreign subtitles were forced in, etc.

Unless there's another purprose for an iso file i'm not privy to.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 9:53:37 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Laramie:



For what purpose? Before I found makemkv others programs I used years ago dealt with ISOs but now the MKV is playable through VLC, so I can check the rip, make sure any foreign subtitles were forced in, etc.

Unless there's another purprose for an iso file i'm not privy to.
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Originally Posted By Laramie:
Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Originally Posted By Laramie:
Originally Posted By MrHiggs:


Interesting...not sure I have the space for that right now, but it might give a try to compare quality.

On a side note, anyone use Plex to stream from a network mounted drive?



Yeah full rips will take up a lot more space obviously. I only keep them long enough to encode with handbrake then I delete them. Like I said, I tested quality side by side and to me there wasn't a huge difference. I've been toying with the idea of getting a blu-ray drive so I could rip the blu-ray movies I have. Obviously there the size would be worth it because the quality difference compared to dvd would be so much better.


Yeah. Any reason you don't just make an iso?



For what purpose? Before I found makemkv others programs I used years ago dealt with ISOs but now the MKV is playable through VLC, so I can check the rip, make sure any foreign subtitles were forced in, etc.

Unless there's another purprose for an iso file i'm not privy to.


Ah ok, I was thinking if you were just ripping down the mkv, then you could do the same thing faster just using isos.
Link Posted: 1/19/2015 9:59:43 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/19/2015 10:00:35 PM EST by Laramie]
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Originally Posted By MrHiggs:


Ah ok, I was thinking if you were just ripping down the mkv, then you could do the same thing faster just using isos.
View Quote


Yeah I think it would take the same amount of time. I'm not super techy but I think from my reading that mkv is essentially the same as an iso just a newer file format/codec but meant specifically for video.

IIRC an ISO is like a mirror image of the disc? The MKV rip is the same in that you can rip all the content stored on the disc, but the file that's ripped is immediately playing as it's more of a supported standard now whereas I THINK iso was originally meant for copying full software discs, but as I said, I'm not sure on the full history of it.

I have a 2.5ghz i5 iMac and most dvd rips only take 30-40 minutes.
Link Posted: 1/20/2015 10:34:20 AM EST
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Originally Posted By hondaciv:
Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Has ARF gone full retard? I am talking about putting my legally owned DVDs into digital format FFS


Illegal.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1707916_Posting_about_watching_stolen_movies_on_torrent_sites_is_not_okay_.html


yup
Link Posted: 1/20/2015 11:43:17 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/20/2015 11:46:27 AM EST by SOMT]
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Originally Posted By hondaciv:
Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Has ARF gone full retard? I am talking about putting my legally owned DVDs into digital format FFS


Illegal.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1707916_Posting_about_watching_stolen_movies_on_torrent_sites_is_not_okay_.html


I'm sure you're being sarcastic, but no it's not illegal to make digital copies of your rightfully purchased DVDs/Blurays as long as they don't have DRM.
Link Posted: 1/20/2015 11:49:43 AM EST
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Originally Posted By SOMT:


I'm sure you're being sarcastic, but no it's not illegal to make digital copies of your rightfully purchased DVDs/Blurays as long as they don't have DRM.
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Originally Posted By SOMT:
Originally Posted By hondaciv:
Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Has ARF gone full retard? I am talking about putting my legally owned DVDs into digital format FFS


Illegal.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1707916_Posting_about_watching_stolen_movies_on_torrent_sites_is_not_okay_.html


I'm sure you're being sarcastic, but no it's not illegal to make digital copies of your rightfully purchased DVDs/Blurays as long as they don't have DRM.



It is illegal to crack the DRM which all DVDs have



The moment you crack DRM (Digital Rights Managemnt) to rip the DVD, you've violated Title I of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. 17 U.S.C. 1201 prohibits circumvention of DRM . . . Some courts have tried to leaven this rather harsh rule, but most have not. While it's typically hard to detect small-scale circumvention, the question is whether bypassing DRM is legal. The statute sets up some minor exceptions, but our ripper doesn't fall into any of them. So, the moment a studio protects the DVD with DRM, it gains both a technical and a legal advantage—ripping is almost certainly unlawful


http://lifehacker.com/5978326/is-it-legal-to-rip-a-dvd-that-i-own
Link Posted: 1/20/2015 11:54:17 AM EST
1)DVDs are 480 not 720
2)2500kbps
is way too much for 480 video

I use constant quality 20 instead of average bit rate.



Link Posted: 1/20/2015 12:12:28 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/20/2015 12:13:27 PM EST by SOMT]
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Originally Posted By captblue1:



It is illegal to crack the DRM which all DVDs have





http://lifehacker.com/5978326/is-it-legal-to-rip-a-dvd-that-i-own
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Originally Posted By captblue1:
Originally Posted By SOMT:
Originally Posted By hondaciv:
Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Has ARF gone full retard? I am talking about putting my legally owned DVDs into digital format FFS


Illegal.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_5/1707916_Posting_about_watching_stolen_movies_on_torrent_sites_is_not_okay_.html


I'm sure you're being sarcastic, but no it's not illegal to make digital copies of your rightfully purchased DVDs/Blurays as long as they don't have DRM.



It is illegal to crack the DRM which all DVDs have



The moment you crack DRM (Digital Rights Managemnt) to rip the DVD, you've violated Title I of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. 17 U.S.C. 1201 prohibits circumvention of DRM . . . Some courts have tried to leaven this rather harsh rule, but most have not. While it's typically hard to detect small-scale circumvention, the question is whether bypassing DRM is legal. The statute sets up some minor exceptions, but our ripper doesn't fall into any of them. So, the moment a studio protects the DVD with DRM, it gains both a technical and a legal advantage—ripping is almost certainly unlawful


http://lifehacker.com/5978326/is-it-legal-to-rip-a-dvd-that-i-own



Obviously you don't read..
Link Posted: 1/20/2015 12:15:25 PM EST
Aha! Plex Media Server on my little 2-bay QNAP can't transcode since the NAS CPU isn't powerful enough. It's just disabled. So I either need to run it on my desktop, or transcode everything before putting it on the PMS.

I'm still looking for the right format to use. :/
Link Posted: 1/20/2015 12:17:08 PM EST
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Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Has ARF gone full retard? I am talking about putting my legally owned DVDs into digital format FFS
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you're breaking the DMCA by bypassing the copy protection on your DVD's, which is an illegal act.
Link Posted: 1/20/2015 12:22:08 PM EST
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Originally Posted By SOMT:



Obviously you don't read..
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Originally Posted By SOMT:
Originally Posted By captblue1:
Originally Posted By SOMT:


I'm sure you're being sarcastic, but no it's not illegal to make digital copies of your rightfully purchased DVDs/Blurays as long as they don't have DRM.



It is illegal to crack the DRM which all DVDs have



The moment you crack DRM (Digital Rights Managemnt) to rip the DVD, you've violated Title I of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. 17 U.S.C. 1201 prohibits circumvention of DRM . . . Some courts have tried to leaven this rather harsh rule, but most have not. While it's typically hard to detect small-scale circumvention, the question is whether bypassing DRM is legal. The statute sets up some minor exceptions, but our ripper doesn't fall into any of them. So, the moment a studio protects the DVD with DRM, it gains both a technical and a legal advantage—ripping is almost certainly unlawful


http://lifehacker.com/5978326/is-it-legal-to-rip-a-dvd-that-i-own



Obviously you don't read..



all the negatives in your sentence was confusing. and I didn't read too closely.
Link Posted: 1/20/2015 12:28:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/20/2015 12:34:32 PM EST by Rugerlvr]
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Originally Posted By Dino:

you're breaking the DMCA by bypassing the copy protection on your DVD's, which is an illegal act.
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Originally Posted By Dino:
Originally Posted By MrHiggs:
Has ARF gone full retard? I am talking about putting my legally owned DVDs into digital format FFS

you're breaking the DMCA by bypassing the copy protection on your DVD's, which is an illegal act.

I'm trying to figure out what format my home videos need to be in to play on my Roku through Plex. So leave me out of the legal discussion. Got 930 videos clips taken with digital cameras and flip video that need to be pre-transcoded.

ETA: And here's my answer: http://www.rokoding.com/
Link Posted: 1/20/2015 1:32:21 PM EST
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Originally Posted By DragoMuseveni:
1)DVDs are 480 not 720
2)2500kbps
is way too much for 480 video

I use constant quality 20 instead of average bit rate.


View Quote


This. I use MakeMKV to get a main movie file into an MKV file, then Vidcoder (which is Handbrake under the hood) to queue up a bunch of full-size MKV files and then let them all transcode into smaller files overnight or while I'm not home. Constant quality 20 is usually about right in my (limited) experience.
Link Posted: 1/20/2015 1:48:04 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Chairman:
This. I use MakeMKV to get a main movie file into an MKV file, then Vidcoder (which is Handbrake under the hood) to queue up a bunch of full-size MKV files and then let them all transcode into smaller files overnight or while I'm not home. Constant quality 20 is usually about right in my (limited) experience.
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I use MakeMKV too for all my Blu-rays and DVDs. I also use Plex and both work great together. Of course my PLEX Media Server is on a very robust PC and not an underpowered NAS.
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