Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 3
Posted: 10/22/2016 5:36:13 PM EDT
About once a year, I rinse/wash my engine and compartment. Usually takes only five minutes or so after changing the oil. I get tired of seeing it so dirty.
This knocks off the dust, get the bugs/debris off the radiator (and transmission cooler), removes pieces of stray leaves and other things that could cause corrosion.

I don't use a power washer. I'd be afraid that I'd loosen a vacuum hose or electrical contact.

I don't see this would cause any problems. What sayeth the hive?
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:38:27 PM EDT
I use Brawndo, it's got what cars need.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:40:19 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By P400:
I use Brawndo, it's got what cars need.
View Quote

Brawndo? The stuff from the toilet?
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:40:56 PM EDT
No.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:42:12 PM EDT
Not on a modern car.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:43:29 PM EDT
I used to.
I'd go to the coin operated wash and give it a good once over with the low pressure degreaser. Then the regular pressure clean water rinse.
Just stay off of the stuff you know doesn't work or play well with water.
If you really want to go all the way, spray all the non metal parts (hoses, plastic covers, etc...) with WD40. Don't wipe anything down, just spray it wet.
Your engine and engine compartment will look brand new.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:43:52 PM EDT
Once or twice a year with Simple Green.

Lots of people use Purple Power but it is billed as corrosive. I once used it on an engine and noticed corrosion/discoloration of an aluminum intake plenum not long afterwards.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:46:51 PM EDT
I've been washing engines for about 25 years... I own a pressure washing business. I don't use super high pressure but it's definitely higher that your typical car wash.
Never had a problem. To do a good job you require heat, pressure and chemicals.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:47:22 PM EDT
Every spring I detail the engine, wax the underside of the hood too
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:55:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/22/2016 5:57:14 PM EDT by AKSnowRider]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hummerbk:
I've been washing engines for about 25 years... I own a pressure washing business. I don't use super high pressure but it's definitely higher that your typical car wash.
Never had a problem. To do a good job you require heat, pressure and chemicals.
View Quote

Same for me but for more years and I have my own hotsy, and I use both simple green and super clean ..gotta be careful with straight super clean around aluminum, and spray paint/ under coats..but it works the best for removing the nastiest stuff...sometimes you will need to use compressed air and electromotive cleaner to dry stuff out, but otherwise easy to keep a vehicle looking new from bumper to bumper....


ETA..if you spray the undercarriage, go thru afterwards and hot all the grease zeros since the water can get in sometimes...
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:56:43 PM EDT
On a modern car?

No.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:58:02 PM EDT
... I've paid detailers to do it on occasion. Haven't done it myself in 3 decades
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:58:49 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mancat:
Once or twice a year with Simple Green.

Lots of people use Purple Power but it is billed as corrosive. I once used it on an engine and noticed corrosion/discoloration of an aluminum intake plenum not long afterwards.
View Quote



Simple green is also corrosive to aluminum. That's why it is not allowed to be used to clean airplane parts.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:59:13 PM EDT
Not a single time.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:59:42 PM EDT
I used to give the engine compartment a good clean once in a while until I had a car with an optispark distributor. That learned me. :)

Link Posted: 10/22/2016 5:59:50 PM EDT
I used to do it when I had older cars. I'd just head over to the coin op car wash with a can of engine degreaser and aluminum foil. I would cover anything I didn't want wet with foil. Back then it was the carb, distributor, and alternator. Then I'd spray everything down with the degreaser and let it sit for a minute. Then blast it all off with the high pressure hose at the car wash. Never had a problem, engine always came out looking great.

But the "newest" car I did this on was made in 1987. Never tried it with my new cars (2000 and newer). I had considered buying a steam cleaner to clean modern car engines. Seems like a safer way to do it on a modern car.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:02:32 PM EDT
Yep, every year or two. Aluminum foil over the air filter and alternator then simple green and garden hose.

My 16 year old engine.
_MG_1293 by L J, on Flickr" />

Needs cleaning again.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:02:39 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mancat:
Once or twice a year with Simple Green.

Lots of people use Purple Power but it is billed as corrosive. I once used it on an engine and noticed corrosion/discoloration of an aluminum intake plenum not long afterwards.
View Quote


Simple Green is corrosive.
That's why the Military does not use in on aircraft or weapons systems.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:02:58 PM EDT
Used to when I worked for Mercedes.
I hate working on greasy oily engines, especially diesel.
Used head with mineral spirits under pressure.
Makes them squeaky clean. Of course that was back in the dark ages and the epa had bo say in the matter.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:04:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/22/2016 6:05:42 PM EDT by Silver_Surfer]
About 4 times a year. Besides looking nicer it makes finding trouble faster if or when it happens.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:06:29 PM EDT
Yes!
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:08:47 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:11:51 PM EDT
Nope I grab it by the PULLEY and shake it till it's clean, cause that's what it wants.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:14:24 PM EDT
I wash my f150 a few times a year, Just not directly at the spark plugs or electronics. Keep the pressure washer back so its not high pressure water directly blasting into where it doesn't belong. I like to drive after to get the engine up to temp to dry it off.

The engine gets soaked every time you drive in the rain so cleaning it is ok.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:23:16 PM EDT
I never tried it myself, but I once heard someone suggest having the engine running while you wash the engine bay. If the idle begins to stumble while washing, that's a sign to stop wetting whatever you're wetting.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:24:41 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KA3B:


Simple Green is corrosive.
That's why the Military does not use in on aircraft or weapons systems.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By mancat:
Once or twice a year with Simple Green.

Lots of people use Purple Power but it is billed as corrosive. I once used it on an engine and noticed corrosion/discoloration of an aluminum intake plenum not long afterwards.


Simple Green is corrosive.
That's why the Military does not use in on aircraft or weapons systems.


This. We do not use it on planes.

And no, not on modern cars. Learned the hard way, did it my truck a long time ago, ended up having to replace the two knock sensors. That Was with only a water hose..........
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:26:27 PM EDT
About once a year or so I hose it out at a car wash. Living on a dirt road tends to get it a little dirty under there.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:32:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/22/2016 6:33:53 PM EDT by Slopes-2-Shores]
Yes. As others, only a couple times a year. I typically drive older cars. I do use the pressure washer without using a high pressure nozzle and without spraying directly. I'm always cautious to not remove the patina as well. But yes I do clean it up in there. It makes my maintenance / repairs easier.

Cheers!
-JC

ETA: I hose the whole works down with WD40 afterwards to displace water.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:40:06 PM EDT
Washed mine a few times when it gets dusty. But pretty much never.
Use chemical bro's silk shine on it and nothing sticks to it. Looks new for months.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:42:43 PM EDT
used to but I just don't understand cars anymore, motors are sealed in plastic and more electrical than a car 25 years ago. If my mechanic requests it he has a guy that does it it for a living.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:46:50 PM EDT
Yeah, every shade tree grease mechanic knows about that stuff in a Can. "Engine Clean" ? or something like that?

Drive to the car wash, pop the hood, spray it liberally, then hose it down with hot water. Drive it dry.

We always used to leave the car running. I've often wondered if it had the potential to crack metal, or cause electrical issues, but I've never heard of it doing so.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:50:55 PM EDT
I usually wash my car once a week, so I wash the engine bay too. I can go right now and reach shoulder deep under my hood and pull out a clean arm.

Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:51:31 PM EDT
Yes, to get the salt off. Never with a pressure washer....too much risk of getting water into a place where it shouldn't be.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:54:16 PM EDT
I do once or twice a year.

I would not recommend using a pressure washer.

I use purple power, a brush, and a light spray from the garden hose. I am careful not to soak the obvious stuff like the air intake.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 6:56:08 PM EDT
I get each of our cars about twice per year. Disconnect the battery, cover up a few key electrical junctions, clean the bay with Megiuar's APC (cut 1:4 with distilled water, I think), let it sit for a few minutes then agitate with a brush, rinse clean. I then cover it with 2 coats of Sonus engine dressing and blot off the extra after 30 or so minutes.

This is my wife's 100,000 mile 10 year old car. Looks nice and makes it nice to work on. Pride of ownership and all that.

Link Posted: 10/22/2016 7:48:13 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 8:15:28 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By brass:
Wrap the alternator in a plastic bag first, as well as any external coil packs. Don't put much direct pressure spray on the plug wires.

People then do everything from letting it dry, to wiping with Armor All, spraying with Tire Clean, and using clear coat to bring the black back on chalked over black areas.

View Quote


While I don't intentionally soak the alternator, I've never had a problem from hitting it during the spraying/rinsing process, but I usually let the vehicle sit overnight as well and don't run it right away.

As far as the comments about Simple Green being corrosive.. Well that's news to me, I never checked the label or MSDS because I never had any issues with it, while Purple Power seemed to have a much stronger effect on aluminum.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 8:17:13 PM EDT
not the whole thing.

I keep the engine cover, top of rad, strut towers, relay box, battery and air box covers clean

Link Posted: 10/22/2016 8:34:33 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 8:37:31 PM EDT
On my Harley
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 8:43:01 PM EDT
Yes, with engine degreaser, worked well.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 8:49:21 PM EDT
Yes. Then when dry I detail it.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 8:49:55 PM EDT
I have a silver car. I don't wash it . . . at all.
That's what rain is for.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 8:56:38 PM EDT
Microfiber cloth with a bucket of water, it soaks up everything

Then I hose the bay in silicone lube. Preserves the plastic really well.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 9:10:24 PM EDT
I detail the engine with degreaser and a rag whenever I'm wrenching on it.

I never rarely use water.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 9:22:07 PM EDT
You guys who are saying "no", "not on modern cars" or "wrap this, then wrap that first" would faint if you saw how the detailers at the dealership wash/detail engines.....and the whole car for that matter.
(FYI: electrical components on newer cars are sealed a lot better than on older cars. Washing it will, 90% of the time, not cause any problems but it's wise to use compressed air around vital areas before key in ignition.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 9:22:41 PM EDT
I used to but I was explicitly told not to do it on my Porsches.

I would still do it on my old 929 but it doesn't need it.

Not sure on my Frontier. Lots of electronics that don't look watertight around the upper edge of the compartment.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 9:30:46 PM EDT
As little as possible but I do.

The last couple of highlanders I've had collect leaves acorns and debris. The debris gets caught under the fresh air intake and wipe linkage covers. It has clogged up the water drains for the fresh air feed for the climate controls.
Poor design plus oak trees require cleaning 3 or 4 times a year.
After cleaning the covers I lightly hose off the engine compartment. If I don't the next time the car is driven the smell from the debris stinks like burning leaves and freaks the wife out.

Never seen a design catch debris like this.
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 10:15:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 10:19:46 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/22/2016 10:19:51 PM EDT
You could have open-heart surgery in my engine compartment and be fine.
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 3
Top Top