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4/22/2019 5:32:20 PM
Posted: 5/2/2015 12:43:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/2/2015 1:23:41 AM EDT by Xringlover]
400 to 500 yards seems to be relatively easy.

After that, skill and experience comes into play.

Some wind and "equipment capability"......................all bets are off.

Poll to follow.

I realize that the bullet weight that you are using will make a difference. If you want to comment on that weight, feel free to do that on the caliber that you are using.







Link Posted: 5/2/2015 12:44:38 AM EDT
Do what?
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 1:23:26 AM EDT
I voted 6-900 yards, but not with a 308..but with my 300RUM...I have gotten solid(dead)hits on 1 brown bear and 2 wolves at that distance in the past............
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 1:28:36 AM EDT
Depending on the temp you can read the heat waves in the scope out to target.

Kinda hard to do at first then you get the hang of it.

Can also see how trees are moving as well.

Link Posted: 5/2/2015 1:40:57 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By AKSnowRider:
I voted 6-900 yards, but not with a 308..but with my 300RUM...I have gotten solid(dead)hits on 1 brown bear and 2 wolves at that distance in the past............
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More bullet weight is better for heavier "target weight" on the other end of the muzzle.
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 1:41:57 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By MILLERLGT82:
Depending on the temp you can read the heat waves in the scope out to target.

Kinda hard to do at first then you get the hang of it.

Can also see how trees are moving as well.

View Quote


You are talking about heat mirage aren`t you?


Link Posted: 5/2/2015 1:42:45 AM EDT
Reading the wind has nothing to do with cartridge selection and everything to do with your optics and experience.
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 1:45:10 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Xringlover:


More bullet weight is better for heavier "target weight" on the other end of the muzzle.
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Originally Posted By Xringlover:
Originally Posted By AKSnowRider:
I voted 6-900 yards, but not with a 308..but with my 300RUM...I have gotten solid(dead)hits on 1 brown bear and 2 wolves at that distance in the past............


More bullet weight is better for heavier "target weight" on the other end of the muzzle.

LOL..the bear was 200 gr. barnes X bullets..the wolves, one was a 180 swift scirocco, the other a 165 barnes solid....
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 1:55:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/2/2015 1:56:34 AM EDT by Xringlover]
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Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Reading the wind has nothing to do with cartridge selection and everything to do with your optics and experience.
View Quote


Hmmm.............

I think it is a dual faceted formula. Farther out, better accuracy would be obtained in windier conditions, using a heavier projectile that could buck the wind. The heavier projectile also, would deliver more energy to the target.

What do you think?





Link Posted: 5/2/2015 1:59:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/2/2015 2:00:47 AM EDT by ziarifleman]
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Originally Posted By Xringlover:


Hmmm.............

I think it is a dual faceted formula. Farther out, better accuracy would be obtained in windier conditions, using a heavier projectile that could buck the wind. The heavier projectile also, would deliver more energy to the target.

What do you think?

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Originally Posted By Xringlover:
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Reading the wind has nothing to do with cartridge selection and everything to do with your optics and experience.


Hmmm.............

I think it is a dual faceted formula. Farther out, better accuracy would be obtained in windier conditions, using a heavier projectile that could buck the wind. The heavier projectile also, would deliver more energy to the target.

What do you think?


Replace heavier with higher BC.

It's still a weird way to look at it. Wind is the most subjective piece of long-range shooting.
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 2:06:01 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Reading the wind has nothing to do with cartridge selection and everything to do with your optics and experience.
View Quote


Set up a target at 100 yards with a 15 MPH cross wind. Shoot a .22lr then a .243 and tell me cartridge selection has nothing to do with it.
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 2:14:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/2/2015 2:17:51 AM EDT by Xringlover]
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Originally Posted By ziarifleman:

Replace heavier with higher BC.

It's still a weird way to look at it. Wind is the most subjective piece of long-range shooting.
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Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Originally Posted By Xringlover:
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Reading the wind has nothing to do with cartridge selection and everything to do with your optics and experience.


Hmmm.............

I think it is a dual faceted formula. Farther out, better accuracy would be obtained in windier conditions, using a heavier projectile that could buck the wind. The heavier projectile also, would deliver more energy to the target.

What do you think?


Replace heavier with higher BC.

It's still a weird way to look at it. Wind is the most subjective piece of long-range shooting.




Doesn`t a heavier bullet weight yield a higher BC?




Link Posted: 5/2/2015 2:17:50 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By 2JokersWild:


Set up a target at 100 yards with a 15 MPH cross wind. Shoot a .22lr then a .243 and tell me cartridge selection has nothing to do with it.
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Originally Posted By 2JokersWild:
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Reading the wind has nothing to do with cartridge selection and everything to do with your optics and experience.


Set up a target at 100 yards with a 15 MPH cross wind. Shoot a .22lr then a .243 and tell me cartridge selection has nothing to do with it.


Caliber has nothing to do with reading wind. Caliber selection has considerably more to do with mitigating the effect of an error in reading the wind.
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 2:18:18 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Xringlover:


I can agree with you are saying.

Doesn`t a heavier bullet weight yield a higher BC?


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Originally Posted By Xringlover:
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Originally Posted By Xringlover:
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Reading the wind has nothing to do with cartridge selection and everything to do with your optics and experience.


Hmmm.............

I think it is a dual faceted formula. Farther out, better accuracy would be obtained in windier conditions, using a heavier projectile that could buck the wind. The heavier projectile also, would deliver more energy to the target.

What do you think?


Replace heavier with higher BC.

It's still a weird way to look at it. Wind is the most subjective piece of long-range shooting.


I can agree with you are saying.

Doesn`t a heavier bullet weight yield a higher BC?



Not always. Compare the 6.5mm 142gr Sierra MatchKing to the .30 cal 175 MatchKing.

Or getting even further up there, the .224" 80gr SMK to a 300 gr round nose.
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 2:19:07 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Pro_Patria_431:


Caliber has nothing to do with reading wind. Caliber selection has considerably more to do with mitigating the effect of an error in reading the wind.
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Originally Posted By Pro_Patria_431:
Originally Posted By 2JokersWild:
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Reading the wind has nothing to do with cartridge selection and everything to do with your optics and experience.


Set up a target at 100 yards with a 15 MPH cross wind. Shoot a .22lr then a .243 and tell me cartridge selection has nothing to do with it.


Caliber has nothing to do with reading wind. Caliber selection has considerably more to do with mitigating the effect of an error in reading the wind.

That's a good way to put it.
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 2:23:43 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Pro_Patria_431:


Caliber has nothing to do with reading wind. Caliber selection has considerably more to do with mitigating the effect of an error in reading the wind.
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Originally Posted By Pro_Patria_431:
Originally Posted By 2JokersWild:
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Reading the wind has nothing to do with cartridge selection and everything to do with your optics and experience.


Set up a target at 100 yards with a 15 MPH cross wind. Shoot a .22lr then a .243 and tell me cartridge selection has nothing to do with it.


Caliber has nothing to do with reading wind. Caliber selection has considerably more to do with mitigating the effect of an error in reading the wind.


Fair enough.
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 2:32:23 AM EDT
The premise of the OP is flawed. If you have a good idea of what the wind is doing along the flight path, it really doesn't matter what the velocity/direction is, or the round used. It is then just a matter of applying the appropriate correction to the optic, if you have good data for your chosen rifle.

A better question would be " How accurate can you make the call before sending a round downrange?" Or "What is the max range you can make an accurate call?"

I usually have to correct after the first round personally, so I may be full of shit.
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 2:53:42 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By ziarifleman:

Not always. Compare the 6.5mm 142gr Sierra MatchKing to the .30 cal 175 MatchKing.

Or getting even further up there, the .224" 80gr SMK to a 300 gr round nose.
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Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Originally Posted By Xringlover:
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Originally Posted By Xringlover:
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Reading the wind has nothing to do with cartridge selection and everything to do with your optics and experience.


Hmmm.............

I think it is a dual faceted formula. Farther out, better accuracy would be obtained in windier conditions, using a heavier projectile that could buck the wind. The heavier projectile also, would deliver more energy to the target.

What do you think?


Replace heavier with higher BC.

It's still a weird way to look at it. Wind is the most subjective piece of long-range shooting.


I can agree with you are saying.

Doesn`t a heavier bullet weight yield a higher BC?



Not always. Compare the 6.5mm 142gr Sierra MatchKing to the .30 cal 175 MatchKing.

Or getting even further up there, the .224" 80gr SMK to a 300 gr round nose.


So you are saying a lighter bullet is going to buck the wind better than a heavier bullet will?
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 3:02:06 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Xringlover:

So you are saying a lighter bullet is going to buck the wind better than a heavier bullet will?
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Depending on the shape, yes.
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 3:07:59 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By ziarifleman:

Depending on the shape, yes.
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Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Originally Posted By Xringlover:

So you are saying a lighter bullet is going to buck the wind better than a heavier bullet will?

Depending on the shape, yes.

Technically, wouldn't it be a bit of everything? bullet weight, velocity, BC, ability to judge conditions, knowledge of firearm/cartridge, condition/quality of firearm and shooters abilities?
Link Posted: 5/2/2015 3:08:40 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By AKSnowRider:

Technically, wouldn't it be a bit of everything? bullet weight, velocity, BC, ability to judge conditions, knowledge of firearm/cartridge, condition/quality of firearm and shooters abilities?
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Originally Posted By AKSnowRider:
Originally Posted By ziarifleman:
Originally Posted By Xringlover:

So you are saying a lighter bullet is going to buck the wind better than a heavier bullet will?

Depending on the shape, yes.

Technically, wouldn't it be a bit of everything? bullet weight, velocity, BC, ability to judge conditions, knowledge of firearm/cartridge, condition/quality of firearm and shooters abilities?

Correct.
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