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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 9/14/2009 3:42:43 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2009 3:44:34 PM EST by MissouriBob]
Yesterday this thread discussed books and films considered by academia to be classics but really sucked.

Today I would like to hear what people think really are classics.

It could be something that is considered a classic such as Lord of the Rings (Tolkien), Homer's Iliad, or Walden (Thoreau) and you agree they are classics (I do on these) or
it could be something that you would put into a high school or college curriculum that you might not typically find there. Examples of this might be
The Federalist (it used to be there but let's not go there) or Red Dawn.

I would expect this list to be much larger.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 3:50:06 PM EST
Unforgiven
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 3:52:57 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2009 3:53:09 PM EST by N1Rampage]
Atlas Shrugged could have used a 500 page haircut.

To appreciate Rand you need to read her works in the order she wrote them.

Heinlein is great. Some of his works vary in quality. Stranger in a Strange Land (original, unedited version) was terrible.

I do like Dr. Zhivago, 1984, Brave New World, and Animal Farm.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 3:55:12 PM EST
Film:

Das Boot
Breaker Morant
Grand Torino
The Godfather
Apocalypse Now
Lawrence of Arabia
The Departed
Jaws
Alien
Terminator


Book:
The Bible
The Old man and the Sea
To Have and Have Not
For Whom the Bell Tolls
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
The Day of the Jackal

Both lists are off the top of my head and partial
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 3:57:50 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 3:59:27 PM EST
The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:00:23 PM EST
The Big Lebowski.

Snatch.

Rock n Rolla.

Conan, by Robert E. Howard.

Jaws.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:00:58 PM EST
Boondock saints.

/thread
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:01:25 PM EST
Originally Posted By Terrato:
The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly


This.

There is a lot of existentialism in Eastwood's spaghetti westerns.

Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:01:43 PM EST
No one said Red Dawn yet?
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:04:00 PM EST
Star Wars saga
Indiana Jones saga
Lord of The Rings saga
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:05:56 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2009 4:07:28 PM EST by anekrel]
Books:

Don Quixote
Jane Eyre
Moby Dick
I, Robot
A Tale Of Two Cities
1984 (that book scared the crap out of me when I was younger)
A Brave New World
Positronic Man

Movies:

The French Connection
The Dark Knight
Alien
Terminator
Fargo
Saving Private Ryan
Gran Torino
The Departed
Star Wars (IV, V, VI)
LOTR
Best In Show
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:13:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2009 4:13:54 PM EST by DemonicLemming]
Lord of the Rings
Dune (series)
Hyperion cantos
Aubrey/Maturin series
Starship Troopers
Animal Farm
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:15:56 PM EST
Films:

A Walk in the Sun
A Man for All Seasons

Books:

Street Without Joy
The Centurions
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:35:28 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2009 4:57:15 PM EST by DH2]
Note: Some of these books are ones that should be read as opposed to being great literary works or the like.

Books:

Harry Potter (not a classic, but certainly just to have something that a student might actually enjoy reading)
Redwall
Hamlet
Killer Angels
Hunt for Red October
Tarzan (the series by Edgar Rice Burroughs)
Where the Red Fern Grows
Hatchet
Wizard of Oz
The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe
White Fang
Call of the Wild
20000 Leagues Under the Sea
Lord of the Rings
Feakenomics
Common Sense
CS Forrester's Horatio Hornblower books
The Scarlet Pimpernel
The Count of Monte Cristo
The Swiss Family Robinson
The Hobbit
Gulliver's Travels
The Odyssey
The Illiad
Canterbury Tales
Beowulf
The Art of War (Sun Tzu)
Common Sense
Moby Dick
Walden
Treasure Island
The Bible
All Quiet on the Western Front
Alas Babylon
Dante's Inferno
Hot Zone
China Syndrome
Ishamel


Movies:

Hunt for Red October
Field of Dreams
Apollo 13
Schindler's List
Animal House
October Sky
Star Wars (only episodes 4, 5, and 6)
Top Gun
Wizard of Oz
20000 Leagues Under the Sea
The Swiss Family Robinson
Finding Forrester
Forrest Gump
Saving Private Ryan
Gladiator
Spartacus
Casablanca
The God Father
The Count of Monte Cristo (the old one)
The Scarlet Pimpernel (any of them)
Superman (the original)
Batman Begins
The Dark Knight
James Bond (only some of them)
The Lord of the Rings
King Kong (1928 version)
Grease
Dirty Dancing
Jaws
War of the World (only the radio show)
The Day the Earth Stood Still (the original movie)
The Ten Commandments
Ben Hur
All Quiet on the Western Front
The Princess Bride
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:37:18 PM EST
Originally Posted By RayGunz2:
No one said Red Dawn yet?


First post.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:38:36 PM EST
Originally Posted By RayGunz2:
Star Wars saga
Indiana Jones saga
Lord of The Rings saga


All of the Star Wars movies? Lord of the Rings is really just one long book. I don't know if I would give the movie classic status.

Indiana Jones? The first one for sure.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 4:39:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2009 6:19:21 PM EST by MissouriBob]
Can't believe I forgot this - The Princess Bride.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 5:26:26 PM EST
Originally Posted By MissouriBob:
Can't believe I forgot this - The Princess Diaries.


Erm, do you mean The Princess Bride? Because The Princess Diaries is a book series written by a super-lib and the Disney movie based on the book starring Anne Hathaway.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 5:28:29 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 5:30:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2009 5:38:33 PM EST by bluefalcon]
Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card

The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A. Heinlein

Anthem by Ayn Rand

Hatchet by Gary Paulsen



The Princess Bride

Aliens

The Terminator

Sergeant York

We Were Soldiers

Pulp Fiction

Link Posted: 9/14/2009 5:43:19 PM EST
I'm drawing a real blank on a lot of good ones...

Books:

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
The Martian Chronicles, The Illustrated Man, and Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Once and Future King by T. H. White
1984 and Animal Farm by George Orwell
The Sea Wolf, The Call of the Wild, and White Fang by Jack London
The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
Dune by Frank Herbert
Blindness by Jose Saramago
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien
Hamlet by Shakespeare
I Am Legend by Richard Matheson
Noble Vision by Gen LaGreca
Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Wave by Morton Rhue
Tales from the Twilight Zone by Rod Serling
Lolita and Pnin by Vladimir Nabokov
The Last Mimzy and Other Stories by Henry Kuttner
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes

Movies:

A Fistful of Dollars; For a Few Dollars More; The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly
Red Dawn
Lord of the Rings trilogy
Unforgiven
Star Wars IV, V, VI
The Princess Bride
Disney's Sleeping Beauty
The Wizard of Oz
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 5:54:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2009 6:09:47 PM EST by XM-15]
The Odyssey
Watership Down



Link Posted: 9/14/2009 5:57:35 PM EST
Film - Blade Runner

Book - Neuromancer
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 6:17:06 PM EST
More movies:

Desperado
Vanishing Point
Convoy
Reservoir Dogs
Django
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 6:19:02 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2009 6:23:26 PM EST by MissouriBob]
Originally Posted By LearningToLive:
Originally Posted By MissouriBob:
Can't believe I forgot this - The Princess Diaries.


Erm, do you mean The Princess Bride? Because The Princess Diaries is a book series written by a super-lib and the Disney movie based on the book starring Anne Hathaway.


You are correct. Princess Bride. Not even sure what the Princess Diaries are.

I have not thought about Watership Down in ages. Great read.

Starship Troopers (book).

How the West Was Won (movie).

Link Posted: 9/14/2009 6:22:48 PM EST
The Three Musketeers By Alexander Dumas
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 6:25:03 PM EST
Book: Gates of FIre, by Steven Pressfield.

Movie: 2001: A Space Odyssey, by Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 6:33:06 PM EST
While very few have read it these days Uncle Tom's cabin was an excellent book and quite a history maker as well.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 6:37:06 PM EST
one of my favorite films:

Sergeant York (1941 Gary Cooper)
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 6:40:42 PM EST
I'm rereading one of my favorites right now –– Alas, Babylon by Pat Frank, nuclear SHTF set in the late 50's/early 60's.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 7:01:01 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/14/2009 7:03:57 PM EST by Skillshot]
Originally Posted By MissouriBob:
I would expect this list to be much larger.


Ha! Don't bet on it. Bitching is far easier than praise.

That said, here are my picks:

Starship Troopers THE BOOK. Entertaining scifi with the excellent theme that the right to run the country is best valued by those who have earned it - and as it is best valued, it is taken more seriously. And I love the unabashed portrayal of Earth being the local hegemony and dishing out inter-system terrorism to keep the other races in check.

City of God by St. Augustine. He was in a unique position living during the fall of Rome when we in the West seem to be about as unsure of our cultural tradition as the Romans were. And as assailed by external enemies.

Life of Samuel Johnson by James Boswell. Never has such an extraordinary, genuine soul been written in such a lively, intimate manner. Oliver Wendell Holmes read the book EVERY YEAR most of his life. I've read it six times.

Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Gibbon. He takes Tacitus's style of combining philosophy and history and perfects it. It's a long one though.

Paradise Lost Johnson hated Milton the man but always praised this work, for good reason.

Pride and Prejudice Yes, the favorite pinata of high school students. Fuck 'em, this novel is immortal. And I'll gladly meet anyone on the literary field of battle in it's defense.

The Gulag Archipelago by Solzhenitsyn. The laws of physics and chemistry are the same over in Russia as over here, and so are the laws of morality and psychology. Solz. experienced what a pernicious ideology will do to the minds of men and what evil it will cause those men to do to others. As one of the wisest works of the 20th century, it deserves it's place. Let anyone who loves communism read this account.

Plutarch's Lives Basically a who's who of the ancient world. Reading the lives and accomplishments of the best men of antiquity will always improve the soul.

De Sublimis by Longinus. Everybody knows this one.

Essays by Montaigne.

So many more.




Link Posted: 9/14/2009 7:18:51 PM EST
Originally Posted By Skillshot:
Pride and Prejudice Yes, the favorite pinata of high school students. Fuck 'em, this novel is immortal. And I'll gladly meet anyone on the literary field of battle in it's defense.



I'm not an expert on the matter, in fact I've only seen one movie version and only read part of the mash-up Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, but I didn't like either. From the Austen parts of P&P&Z I can gather that she uses a lot of satire, but I still thought it lacked enough substance and quality to place it highly on a Best Works list. I have no real ammunition with which to meet you on the literary field of battle, but I am still interested in hearing, with an open mind, why you describe this book so positively.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 7:23:52 PM EST
Gummo
Delicatessen
A Clockwork Orange
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 7:31:45 PM EST
The Nuremburg Interviews
The Feathermen
Napalm & Sillyputty
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 7:58:35 PM EST
Originally Posted By Skillshot:
Originally Posted By MissouriBob:
I would expect this list to be much larger.


Ha! Don't bet on it. Bitching is far easier than praise.




You're both right and wrong. If you counted up all the works in both threads this one will probably have more, but the conversation is lost because you are absolutely right that people have much more fun bitching about something than complimenting it. Before anyone thinks that I'm criticizing check and see which thread I started first.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 8:08:41 PM EST
Originally Posted By LearningToLive:
Originally Posted By Skillshot:
Pride and Prejudice Yes, the favorite pinata of high school students. Fuck 'em, this novel is immortal. And I'll gladly meet anyone on the literary field of battle in it's defense.



I'm not an expert on the matter, in fact I've only seen one movie version and only read part of the mash-up Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, but I didn't like either. From the Austen parts of P&P&Z I can gather that she uses a lot of satire, but I still thought it lacked enough substance and quality to place it highly on a Best Works list. I have no real ammunition with which to meet you on the literary field of battle, but I am still interested in hearing, with an open mind, why you describe this book so positively.


Haven't read it yet, eh? Well, what can I say then. Many novels have tried to portray human experiences like love and justice, have had characters that are meant to be believable and interesting, and have tried to be about themes that are engaging. Few succeed, of course, which is probably why we only have a page of classics that "deserve" to be classics compared to the other thread of classics that suck which is a three pages already. Silas Marner is in that other thread, where it deserves to be - we Americans are consumers, not hoarding misers, so even the basic theme of that book makes it obsolete for us. But P&P deals with a thing that will never go out of style, that journey of finding the right spouse, which is pretty much the decision in one's life that is going to affect its course more than any other. Revolving around that theme are the characters, which I think are very well done. They are believable and human, and even though the setting is getting dated, the stereotypes won't ever get old. The love story between Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy is darn good as love stories go, and not in the way that is simply exhilarating to the emotions, but in a way that is a beautiful picture of how love itself grows between two people; even two people who were as square and aloof as those two. And that's what a good novel does - like a fine painting that uses it's physical form to turn the mind to understand concepts of spiritual importance. So give it a try and let me know what you thought.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 8:45:03 PM EST
Originally Posted By Skillshot:
Originally Posted By LearningToLive:
Originally Posted By Skillshot:
Pride and Prejudice Yes, the favorite pinata of high school students. Fuck 'em, this novel is immortal. And I'll gladly meet anyone on the literary field of battle in it's defense.



I'm not an expert on the matter, in fact I've only seen one movie version and only read part of the mash-up Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, but I didn't like either. From the Austen parts of P&P&Z I can gather that she uses a lot of satire, but I still thought it lacked enough substance and quality to place it highly on a Best Works list. I have no real ammunition with which to meet you on the literary field of battle, but I am still interested in hearing, with an open mind, why you describe this book so positively.


Haven't read it yet, eh? Well, what can I say then. Many novels have tried to portray human experiences like love and justice, have had characters that are meant to be believable and interesting, and have tried to be about themes that are engaging. Few succeed, of course, which is probably why we only have a page of classics that "deserve" to be classics compared to the other thread of classics that suck which is a three pages already. Silas Marner is in that other thread, where it deserves to be - we Americans are consumers, not hoarding misers, so even the basic theme of that book makes it obsolete for us. But P&P deals with a thing that will never go out of style, that journey of finding the right spouse, which is pretty much the decision in one's life that is going to affect its course more than any other. Revolving around that theme are the characters, which I think are very well done. They are believable and human, and even though the setting is getting dated, the stereotypes won't ever get old. The love story between Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy is darn good as love stories go, and not in the way that is simply exhilarating to the emotions, but in a way that is a beautiful picture of how love itself grows between two people; even two people who were as square and aloof as those two. And that's what a good novel does - like a fine painting that uses it's physical form to turn the mind to understand concepts of spiritual importance. So give it a try and let me know what you thought.


While I have other books that are much higher on my TBR list, you've successfully convinced me to add P&P to the pile. I appreciate your response, which has now provided me with a much better frame with which to approach the book than I have previously been exposed to.
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 8:49:32 PM EST
True Romance
Link Posted: 9/14/2009 10:47:47 PM EST
Chariots of Fire.
Link Posted: 9/15/2009 12:01:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By DH2:
Note: Some of these books are ones that should be read as opposed to being great literary works or the like.

Books:
Tarzan (the series by Edgar Rice Burroughs)



Books.

Tarzan (the series by Edgar Rice Burroughs)

You mentioned a good one here..I've got all 24 of the ERB Tarzan novels and with the exception of a few, most are actually very well written by a man with an exceptional creative mind..

I've often wondered why Hollywood, esepicially with todays technology, has never capitalized on making a Tarzan film as it was written..They've never mentioned he was an English Lord and a Colonel in the RAF, was highly educated, spoke several languages, fought in WWI & WWII..EBR took Tarzan on adventures in Africa where he encountered many strange people and cultures and journeyed into forgotten lands..Some of those novels, if filmed correctly, would be just as exciting as many others novels and films mentioned in this thread..In the early ones he had an arch enemy, another one where he meets Princess La and one "Tarzan and the Forgein Legion" where he helps wage war against the Japs on the island of Sumata..Instead he's portrayed as a " Me Tarzan , You Jane"...

I'd like to add the books by Eastern KY author Jesse Stuart...





Link Posted: 9/15/2009 4:52:45 AM EST
Originally Posted By Kuraki:
True Romance


A true classic and very underrated...
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 3:21:28 PM EST
Anyone else?
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 7:35:36 PM EST
Tom Sawyer

Huck Finn
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 7:44:58 PM EST
Wizard of Oz
Roadwarrior
Dirty Harry
Zulu
Good, the bad and the ugly
High plains drifter
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 7:47:59 PM EST
This is a book about the literary classics:


It's a great reference that describes and critiques more than 100 classics, from antiquity through the 20th century. It's also nice to read all by itself.

Because of this book I read Huckleberry Finn (somehow I missed this in HS), Meditations (Marcus Aurelius), Robinson Crusoe, Candide, and a few others. I enjoyed them all.
Link Posted: 9/20/2009 8:08:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/20/2009 8:12:17 PM EST by Zardoz]
I have downloaded a shitload of books from Project Gutenberg; enough to last 2 lifetimes. It isn't as nice as having the book in front of you, but what the hell; it's free.

The only drawback is that they only have books that are no longer copywrited (ie: old as hell).
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