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Posted: 1/27/2014 8:15:55 AM EDT
Hi guys me and my S/O are looking for some advice,we have decided to get in shape and start riding bikes on the road. We really want to start this spring and go from being moderately active but zero riding experience to riding in the seagull century ride this fall. Anyone have advice to help us get started? Equipment, training routines advice we need help with it all. Thanks guys
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:18:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 8:20:01 AM EDT by mattellis2]
Go to your local bike shop and get the bike fit to you.  It will make an amazing difference on rides over 40 miles.  

Get ready to spend some money as well...cycling rivals NICE firearms easily.

Eta: If you start riding a lot, be prepared to start eating a lot to keep up.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:19:42 AM EDT
in before the cycling haters.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:20:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 8:21:37 AM EDT by NUCdt04]
well to start - do you already have bikes?

I ride around Eastern PA and we have lots of trails to ride - makes starting out much easier than dealing with vehicles.

here is a prior ride's course - if they keep it the same this will give you an idea of the elevation gain

http://www.mapmyride.com/us/salisbury-md/seagull-century-route-1048677


not too bad - pretty flat.

Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:20:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Mikegold82:
Hi guys me and my S/O are looking for some advice,we have decided to get in shape and start riding bikes on the road. We really want to start this spring and go from being moderately active but zero riding experience to riding in the seagull century ride this fall. Anyone have advice to help us get started? Equipment, training routines advice we need help with it all. Thanks guys
View Quote


Not to be snarky, but ride a lot.

Get the lightest helmer you're willing to shell out bucks for.

Contact points are important.  Don't go cheap on bike shorts, bike shoes, gloves, or saddles.

Ride long when you have time.  Ride hard when you don't have time.

Figure out nutrition and hydration during your long rides as you go.

Bring these questions to the fitness subforum so you get useful answers and not retards saying "stay off the road"
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:20:45 AM EDT
Skinny jeans
Fixie bike
Single front rim brake
Glasses without lenses
Old vintage bike painted a bright color
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:21:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 8:24:11 AM EDT by NUCdt04]
also

cycling shorts

get your seat fitted to your ass..... wear proper shorts.... prepare for ass pain anyway



if you want to go riding sometime let me know - I need to get back out



also use something (like mapmyride above) to track your rides and progress.....

and a pic to motivate you - get out and ride is #1

Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:24:29 AM EDT
Get fitted.

Spend more on a bike then you can afford.

Shut up legs.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:28:36 AM EDT
Hills until your lungs explode and your legs are jelly.  Then more hills
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:30:22 AM EDT
You get what you pay for. Get good shorts also, your balls will thank you
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:31:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 8:32:57 AM EDT by MotorMouth]
Just like with running, start slow, go for known short distances regularly, forget about your times, and get those muscles used to it.  2.5 miles out, 2.5 miles back a few times a week for two weeks, and then add 5 miles out, 5 miles back on the weekends.  The last week of the month, check your times on those trips, and then see if you can do 5 out and back on weekdays, and 10 out and back on weekends, and keep building up the distances from there.

Find a place where you don't have to worry much about motor vehicle traffic, a dedicated bike path, and drive your bikes out there.  Buy a bike rack for your car.

Don't forget to stretch before and after, keep hydrated, keep your postassium (electrolyte levels) up, and be prepared for screaming charlie horses in your calves.  Most of all have fun.

Damn.  It's almost been thirty years since I did a century.

Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:31:39 AM EDT
Mountain climbing/hiking will get you in good shape to bike
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:32:38 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JustJim:
Hills until your lungs explode and your legs are jelly.  Then more hills
View Quote

THIS

It is all about how much you are willing to suffer.

I need to suffer more.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:33:30 AM EDT
Surprised no one has mentioned a power meter. This is the most important tool I have. Stages makes a great crank based one. I love it.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:38:07 AM EDT
see the green?

https://goo.gl/maps/ptnig

those are bike trails



find some near you (maps.google.com  and hit bicycling) and ride them - find ones further away and drive to them and ride. In Philly the SRT and Perkiomen make for a 100 mile round trip that is 95% off the road....
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:39:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 8:41:52 AM EDT by Mikegold82]
I actually hike hunt and fish alot put lots of miles on my legs in the mountains and she uses a stationary 3 days a week as part of her work out routine so we are hoping that will give us an ok base to start some 10-15 mile rides without wishing we were dead. Is it worth it for her to hit the yard sales and thrift stores looking for a serviceable road bike or two to get started or is it a waste of time? I can do the work and fix tires chains ect.  Chambersburg is the nearest big town to us, we were thinking we would go to Gettysburg and get some decent rides around the battlefield.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:41:46 AM EDT


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mattellis2:
Go to your local bike shop and get the bike fit to you.  It will make an amazing difference on rides over 40 miles.  

Get ready to spend some money as well...cycling rivals NICE firearms easily.

Eta: If you start riding a lot, be prepared to start eating a lot to keep up.
View Quote


TPNI.  But if you're a cheapskate, or don't have money for firearms OR bike (like me ) check out bikesdirect.com.  you can get the same quality components as at a bike shop for nearly half the cost.  And I like to "build" my own guns, as well as wrench on my bike, but YMMV.

I've never been professionally "fitted" for my bike but have found I can get it quite comfortable for my purposes.  But if you're working up to a century, you really don't want to hurt yourself with bad form or position, so it might not be a bad idea.  

Also, if you're cheap (again, like me), skip the power meter, and get a cheap timex heart rate monitor.  Start riding, and figure out what the max sustainable hear rate is that you can stand, and match it up with your speed/cadence to start figuring your body out.  Also, if you track it as your start to get into better shape, you'll start to see your cadence and speed begin to pick up as your heart rate stays the same.  It's pretty rewarding.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:42:41 AM EDT
You had best get to riding bud.

Eddy Meryx said it best when asked how he managed to do so well in races, "I ride a lot".

Centuries are hard, even flat ones.
I did a couple to get in shape for 24 hour racing.

I would rather race the 24 hours than do a century, it is just that much easier.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:45:38 AM EDT
local bike shop

tell them you're just getting started and want to work up to a 100 mile ride - and not spend too much

I have under a grand into everything - and went up a model on the bike.... I probably could have bought off the used rack for much less
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:47:03 AM EDT
You need to plan for Peaking at the right time.

Also, not only long distance but do sprints.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:48:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 8:54:22 AM EDT by AeroE]
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:49:44 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mikegold82:
I actually hike hunt and fish alot put lots of miles on my legs in the mountains and she uses a stationary 3 days a week as part of her work out routine so we are hoping that will give us an ok base to start some 10-15 mile rides without wishing we were dead. Is it worth it for her to hit the yard sales and thrift stores looking for a serviceable road bike or two to get started or is it a waste of time? I can do the work and fix tires chains ect.  Chambersburg is the nearest big town to us, we were thinking we would go to Gettysburg and get some decent rides around the battlefield.
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Craigslist is FULL of used road bikes in my AO.  The key is going to be getting a properly fitted bike.  Training for 100 miles involves a lot of saddle time, and if the bike doesn't fit right, it could easily be a 2 steps forward 1 step back process.

The good news is that there are bike shops everywhere that will fit you to a bike, and it may be worth it to pay for a fitting from one.

All that said, back in the day, we didn't need bikes fitted, we just rode (but we're older now, and hurt enough from normal day-to-day stuff).
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:51:39 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mikegold82:
I actually hike hunt and fish alot put lots of miles on my legs in the mountains and she uses a stationary 3 days a week as part of her work out routine so we are hoping that will give us an ok base to start some 10-15 mile rides without wishing we were dead. Is it worth it for her to hit the yard sales and thrift stores looking for a serviceable road bike or two to get started or is it a waste of time? I can do the work and fix tires chains ect.  Chambersburg is the nearest big town to us, we were thinking we would go to Gettysburg and get some decent rides around the battlefield.
View Quote


If you can't afford to go out and buy a pair of thousand dollar touring bikes right now, go look online and elsewhere for used.  If you don't have a bike, you can't ride.  

However, before you go buy used, head over to a cycling shop, tell the sales guy what you're doing, and that you want to get an idea of how to fit yourselves to a bike.  If the sales guy is cool and helpful, go there for all of your future cycling needs like fitting and reconditioning your used bike, accessories, riding gear, and when the time comes, those new bikes.  If he's a dick about it, go somewhere else.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 8:59:45 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 9:00:07 AM EDT by Jay561]
Sure you can get a cheap Timex HRM like I did in the beginning. I will tell you after using a power meter it was pretty much worthless. Being able to know wattage output has pushed me light years forward. I ride at least one century a week 2 if time permits.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:00:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 9:03:52 AM EDT by krammitthefrog]
Voler clothing, made in the USA and the best I've found for the money. Some people are rich enough to afford better stuff but these are my personal favorite in the price range. You will shit when you see how much they still cost, but remember this stuff last for years if you take care of it.

Bikes are a personal thing, but you can get something used on craigslist with some miles for a much better deal than the store. Good parts last a long time, so I'd put more emphasis on getting something with shimano 105 or better, or sram apex/rival or better. I don't know what your budget is, but I'm partial to steel bikes over carbon if you aren't going to be racing competitively. I'll give a pound or 2 for the cost savings and feel of the bike.

Be sure the bike fits, and invest in a good professional fit. If you continue riding, you will be able to do this yourself eventually. When starting out though, you will have no idea how to set up your cleats, seat, and bar position and will be in a world of pain. Get a seat that works for you (not just a cushy one, something that is firm and doesn't kill your ass after riding it for 50+ miles, this may take some trial and error). You can go to any local specialized dealer and get your sit bones measured (no joke) and they can tell you what width seat you need. It's going to hurt at first, but after breaking your ass in a bit, you will be able to do a century on a something with the softness of a 2x4.

Don't overdo it. If you are just starting to ride a bike, be very careful of overtraining. You may get your heart up to the task, but your tendons and ligaments in your legs are fairly underdeveloped if you haven't done strenuous work with them before. This means you have a good likelihood of developing knee pain issues from doing long rides too soon. BE SURE to stretch and foam roll your legs AFTER every ride. I cannot stress that enough, it makes a world of difference.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:01:51 AM EDT
Even when I was really serious into mountain and road biking back in the 90's I rarely rode over 50 miles.  I just got too bored and antsy.  I much preferred hills and interval workouts than boring extended grinding.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:02:35 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By redfish86:
in before the cycling haters.
View Quote


Just don't be a douche, follow the traffic rules.  And don't wear spandex.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:02:44 AM EDT
You have received surprisingly good advice from GD. I find bike shops like gun shops there are great ones and ones staffed by snotty asses. Do not tolerate the later, go elsewhere. Good advice about fitting. You can save money buying used bikes but if you don't know much about them or the sizes you need you will be better served buying at a shop. Many have great used trade in bikes worth the money.
There is some pretty good information on the ragbrai ride web sight. Ride across Iowa. They have a day by day bike riding plan you can follow getting ready for their ride across Iowa. Good stuff.
You can get a good entry level bike for a $1000 more or less but remember thats not all you will need. Bike computer to tell speed distance and cadence, helmet, bike cloths especially shorts and gloves, clip on bike shoes while not mandatory will be advisable, water bottles, water cages, lights, flat tire kits with co2 bottles or a pump, saddle bag to carry food tools and I stick a $20 in there for ice cream or other issues. So you are looking at $250 without the shoes and clips. Add $150 for those.
Set goals and a time line for reaching them. Do a 25, 50, 75 and at least one 85 or 100 before your fall ride. Riding with a group will push you faster so if you train alone pay attention and don't ride much faster in the fall century. Good luck.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:04:42 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By irishtech:


Just don't be a douche, follow the traffic rules.  And don't wear spandex.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By irishtech:
Originally Posted By redfish86:
in before the cycling haters.


Just don't be a douche, follow the traffic rules.  And don't wear spandex.


Stupid ass advice.  If you don't wear "spandex" and try to ride 100 miles you'll wind up with chafing so bad you won't be able to walk for days.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:08:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 9:13:08 AM EDT by BTccw]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By H46Driver:


Not to be snarky, but ride a lot.

Get the lightest helmer you're willing to shell out bucks for.

Contact points are important.  Don't go cheap on bike shorts, bike shoes, gloves, or saddles.

Ride long when you have time.  Ride hard when you don't have time.

Figure out nutrition and hydration during your long rides as you go.


Bring these questions to the fitness subforum so you get useful answers and not retards saying "stay off the road"
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By H46Driver:
Originally Posted By Mikegold82:
Hi guys me and my S/O are looking for some advice,we have decided to get in shape and start riding bikes on the road. We really want to start this spring and go from being moderately active but zero riding experience to riding in the seagull century ride this fall. Anyone have advice to help us get started? Equipment, training routines advice we need help with it all. Thanks guys


Not to be snarky, but ride a lot.

Get the lightest helmer you're willing to shell out bucks for.

Contact points are important.  Don't go cheap on bike shorts, bike shoes, gloves, or saddles.

Ride long when you have time.  Ride hard when you don't have time.

Figure out nutrition and hydration during your long rides as you go.


Bring these questions to the fitness subforum so you get useful answers and not retards saying "stay off the road"


Good advice.
Also find someone experienced in your local area who will ride with you. Find and learn the local cycling roads-learn to ride "assertively" and stay alive. Wear the most outrageous colors you can Cyclists are invisible to most people.
Learn to spin a small gear (a lighter or easier gear) at 85-110 rpm (your knees will thank me much much later) and learn to ride in a straight line!
Get a good cycling computer that will let you see RPMS and heart rate. learn to corelate the two. One is your "transmission" one is your engine RPMS.
Besides learning to ride....learn to recover.
Have fun...if it isn't fun.....stop.

ETA
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:09:16 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Jay561:
Shut up legs.
View Quote


Best advice by far.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:16:02 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Jay561:
Get fitted.

Spend more on a bike then you can afford.

Shut up legs.
View Quote


Best advice so far. Also, echoing a previous statement: Ride long when you can. Ride hard when you cannot. Just get out. Amazing how much actual riding can lead to more, actual riding.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:16:46 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Yoikaze:
Mountain climbing/hiking will get you in good shape to bike
View Quote


Is the reverse also true? Will biking like a crazy man get me in shape for Hiking Philmont this summer?
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:21:58 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By echo6:


Is the reverse also true? Will biking like a crazy man get me in shape for Hiking Philmont this summer?
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By echo6:
Originally Posted By Yoikaze:
Mountain climbing/hiking will get you in good shape to bike


Is the reverse also true? Will biking like a crazy man get me in shape for Hiking Philmont this summer?


Yes, a friend who is also on here was pleasantly surprised during his hunting trip this past year. He was initially worried having lost some of the weight/muscle, but said he felt better than ever.

I frequently cross train with hiking/biking and feel that the biking allows good non load bearing exercise to save my joints, while hiking with heavy weight helps to build up bone density.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:30:04 AM EDT
Get yourself a good saddle that fits your sit bones, some quality bibs that fit properly, some good pedals (w/ plenty of float if you have any knee issues), a stiff/light pair of shoes that fit properly and get fitted on the bike by a competent shop. Those things will keep you the most pain free and comfortable on the bike for long rides IMO.



Then just put in as much saddle time as your schedule and legs will allow. Maybe do some intervals once a week or so.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:31:19 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By echo6:


Is the reverse also true? Will biking like a crazy man get me in shape for Hiking Philmont this summer?
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By echo6:
Originally Posted By Yoikaze:
Mountain climbing/hiking will get you in good shape to bike


Is the reverse also true? Will biking like a crazy man get me in shape for Hiking Philmont this summer?


It's true that your body will benefit from both activities, but if you really want to be a better hiker, you need to hike, and if you want to be a better cyclist, you need to ride.

Enjoy Philmont! I spent two weeks there in the 70's and it's still one of the best experiences I've ever had…and I've lead a very eventful life.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:42:05 AM EDT
Don't worry about weight. Get good tires like Gatorskins.  Good luck and watch out for Arfcomers.

Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:42:33 AM EDT
Spin Fast.  That is the singular secret to distance riding.

Ride into the wind on your way out, not the other way around.

Don't worry about how fast you're going in a headwind.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:45:50 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 9:48:20 AM EDT
Cycling Rules: Read them, learn them, know them, live by them

Especially Rule 5 and Rule 20!

My advice is don't try to ride more than your butt is used to handling at first, do not try riding too many consecutive days at first, buy good gear to start and you won't spend more on replacing the cheap stuff later, and make sure you are eating and drinking enough.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 10:04:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 10:12:15 AM EDT by bden]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mikegold82:
...Contact points are important.  Don't go cheap on bike shorts, bike shoes, gloves, or saddles.

Ride long when you have time.  Ride hard when you don't have time.

Figure out nutrition and hydration during your long rides as you go...
View Quote

^Excellent advice
Above all else get good equipment and ride.  You don't need a $3k bike, but it's nice if you've got a good setup.  You do pretty much need a dedicated road bike.  I've seen people ride centuries on mt. bikes in jean shorts, but it isn't pretty and doesn't look like an ounce of fun.  Keep an eye out on Craigslist, etc., talk to your local shop about deals they may have, and absolutely have it fit to you.  

Riding frequently to train is better than riding impressive distances less often.  You'll feel much better if you're riding 3-4+ days per week leading up to the ride.  If your current fitness level is good you can certainly get by with much less, but you'll enjoy yourself more the more you prepare.  1 or fewer days per week of training will make for a long ride.  Even running can help if you can't get on the bike.

A "pro fit" costing $100+ probably isn't necessary if you can find someone knowledgeable to help.  Definitely don't skip the fit though.  For an occasional 20-30 mile ride you can fake the fit reasonably well, but for 60+ mile rides you're apt to get injured if not fitted properly.  If you notice knee, shoulder, neck, back, etc. pain that accompanies every ride something isn't right.

Good shorts and clipless pedals with decent shoes are a must.  Don't wear any cotton.

Experiment with nutrition during your training rides so you know what to expect.  Make sure to hydrate well (about a bottle per hour for most people).  Try using water vs. a sports drink like Cytomax.  Many find having 1 bottle of each is ideal.  I like to eat something substantial like a Clif Bar or half sandwich about every 25 miles and carry energy gels like Gu in case I start to crash/bonk.

Expect that the final 10-20 miles might suck mentally.  By that point there is some excitement of finishing, but also potentially boredom, soreness, fatigue, hunger, cold, hot, etc.  My opinion is that if you can ride 60 miles relatively comfortably you can do 100 without too much concern.  Know where the climbs are and know your total elevation for the ride.  A century with 3,000' of climbing is MUCH different than one with 6,000'.

If you can draft others your ride will be 10x easier.  Always ride in a pack/pace line when you can.  Get comfortable and learn to do this (mostly don't ever grab a fist full of brakes suddenly) before the big event.

Ignore all stop signs, traffic signals, lights, etc.  Cars will see your racing garb and know you have the right of way.  They'll let you go ahead every time unless they're a real jerk or a crybaby.  

Some of the bike magazines have web forums loaded with info.  Check those out!  Have fun!
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 10:08:55 AM EDT
What everyone has said- plus these 3 things !!! RIDE, RIDE, and RIDE some more. Ride as much as you can The only way to get better at riding a bike
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 10:14:36 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mattellis2:
Go to your local bike shop and get the bike fit to you.  It will make an amazing difference on rides over 40 miles.  

Get ready to spend some money as well...cycling rivals NICE firearms easily.

Eta: If you start riding a lot, be prepared to start eating a lot to keep up.
View Quote


Correct and for God's sake please go to more than one shop. Get a feel for who's selling you what's on the floor and who's actually trying to sell you what's best for you and fits you. Do some research on sizing bikes. Different companies use different rulers so it can be confusing as to what size bike will fit you.

All told you'll be in it for $1000 - $1500 at a minimum for a bike and the support gear (pumps, computer, helmet, water bottles, shorts, shoes, pedals can easily add $300 - $500 on top of the bike price).

There really is a difference between the budget internet brands and the bike shop brands especially when built by a quality mechanic.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 10:18:42 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 20aegti:
Cycling Rules: Read them, learn them, know them, live by them

Especially Rule 5 and Rule 20!

My advice is don't try to ride more than your butt is used to handling at first, do not try riding too many consecutive days at first, buy good gear to start and you won't spend more on replacing the cheap stuff later, and make sure you are eating and drinking enough.
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The self important, overly pretentious, douche-nozzles that wrote that up need their heads kicked in.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 10:20:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 10:23:22 AM EDT by Lomshek]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mikegold82:
I actually hike hunt and fish alot put lots of miles on my legs in the mountains and she uses a stationary 3 days a week as part of her work out routine so we are hoping that will give us an ok base to start some 10-15 mile rides without wishing we were dead. Is it worth it for her to hit the yard sales and thrift stores looking for a serviceable road bike or two to get started or is it a waste of time? I can do the work and fix tires chains ect.  Chambersburg is the nearest big town to us, we were thinking we would go to Gettysburg and get some decent rides around the battlefield.
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I own a shop and have yet to see someone win the lottery on yard sale bikes. They're either ancient junkers or wore out crap that needs hundreds of dollars of work to revive. If you're not already an experienced mechanic anything made in the last 20 years requires much more knowledge than an old "ten speed" of the '80's and prior.

Indexed shifting, new brake caliper designs and other improvements mean special tools, special cables and way more finicky.

New tires & tubes-$100, new cables and housing for a modern bike $50-$80, new chain $30-$80, new cassette/freewheel $40 - $150. That is just parts not labor and pretty typical of the condition I see yard sale/craigslist bikes in.

ETA - Best method of buying used is to have a mechanic look it over and tell you what it needs then you'll know what it's worth. It's unusual for a used bike more than two years old to not need $200 of work and $100 is as cheap as I've seen them get restored to rideable.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 10:25:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 10:26:00 AM EDT by bden]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Lomshek:


I own a shop and have yet to see someone win the lottery on yard sale bikes. They're either ancient junkers or wore out crap that needs hundreds of dollars of work to revive. If you're not already an experienced mechanic anything made in the last 20 years requires much more knowledge than an old "ten speed" of the '80's and prior.

Indexed shifting, new brake caliper designs and other improvements mean special tools, special cables and way more finicky.

New tires & tubes-$100, new cables and housing for a modern bike $50-$80, new chain $30-$80, new cassette/freewheel $40 - $150. That is just parts not labor and pretty typical of the condition I see yard sale/craigslist bikes in.
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Originally Posted By Lomshek:
Originally Posted By Mikegold82:
I actually hike hunt and fish alot put lots of miles on my legs in the mountains and she uses a stationary 3 days a week as part of her work out routine so we are hoping that will give us an ok base to start some 10-15 mile rides without wishing we were dead. Is it worth it for her to hit the yard sales and thrift stores looking for a serviceable road bike or two to get started or is it a waste of time? I can do the work and fix tires chains ect.  Chambersburg is the nearest big town to us, we were thinking we would go to Gettysburg and get some decent rides around the battlefield.


I own a shop and have yet to see someone win the lottery on yard sale bikes. They're either ancient junkers or wore out crap that needs hundreds of dollars of work to revive. If you're not already an experienced mechanic anything made in the last 20 years requires much more knowledge than an old "ten speed" of the '80's and prior.

Indexed shifting, new brake caliper designs and other improvements mean special tools, special cables and way more finicky.

New tires & tubes-$100, new cables and housing for a modern bike $50-$80, new chain $30-$80, new cassette/freewheel $40 - $150. That is just parts not labor and pretty typical of the condition I see yard sale/craigslist bikes in.


I worked in a bike shop for over 7 years and couldn't agree more with the bold parts above.  If you've got a bike mechanic friend who knows what they're looking at you might score something decent off the web (Craigslist/eBay), but garage sales and thrift stores will be an incredible waste of time in all likelihood.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 11:09:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 11:26:01 AM EDT by Barney_Calhoun]
I haven't read through the entire thread, but when I did my century, I only did 1 long ride per week and increased the distance by 10% each week.  The remainder of my daily rides were roughly 20 miles and the pace of the rides varied between recovery ride to sprint intervals.   Google for century ride training schedules and you'll find plenty of info out there.   Your weekly long ride will start getting upwards of 50 - 60 - 70 miles per ride so plan some fun rides by mixing up your routes through various scenic areas around your state.  You're starting with plenty of time to prepare and you'll most likely be ready to do the full 100 before the organized ride you're planning.   It's going to be a fun summer, enjoy!  

Link Posted: 1/27/2014 11:13:05 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By bden:


I worked in a bike shop for over 7 years and couldn't agree more with the bold parts above.  If you've got a bike mechanic friend who knows what they're looking at you might score something decent off the web (Craigslist/eBay), but garage sales and thrift stores will be an incredible waste of time in all likelihood.
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Originally Posted By bden:
Originally Posted By Lomshek:
Originally Posted By Mikegold82:
I actually hike hunt and fish alot put lots of miles on my legs in the mountains and she uses a stationary 3 days a week as part of her work out routine so we are hoping that will give us an ok base to start some 10-15 mile rides without wishing we were dead. Is it worth it for her to hit the yard sales and thrift stores looking for a serviceable road bike or two to get started or is it a waste of time? I can do the work and fix tires chains ect.  Chambersburg is the nearest big town to us, we were thinking we would go to Gettysburg and get some decent rides around the battlefield.


I own a shop and have yet to see someone win the lottery on yard sale bikes. They're either ancient junkers or wore out crap that needs hundreds of dollars of work to revive. If you're not already an experienced mechanic anything made in the last 20 years requires much more knowledge than an old "ten speed" of the '80's and prior.

Indexed shifting, new brake caliper designs and other improvements mean special tools, special cables and way more finicky.

New tires & tubes-$100, new cables and housing for a modern bike $50-$80, new chain $30-$80, new cassette/freewheel $40 - $150. That is just parts not labor and pretty typical of the condition I see yard sale/craigslist bikes in.


I worked in a bike shop for over 7 years and couldn't agree more with the bold parts above.  If you've got a bike mechanic friend who knows what they're looking at you might score something decent off the web (Craigslist/eBay), but garage sales and thrift stores will be an incredible waste of time in all likelihood.


You both make great points.

Since I have parts/tools laying around, used bikes are easy for me to get working properly. OP, if you have little experience working on bikes and don't have spare stuff, might be best to think new.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 11:17:51 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By irishtech:


Just don't be a douche, follow the traffic rules.  And don't wear spandex.
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Originally Posted By irishtech:
Originally Posted By redfish86:
in before the cycling haters.


Just don't be a douche, follow the traffic rules.  And don't wear spandex.



Try riding a bike for just 40 miles without bike shorts with a good chamois and get back with us.  Or if you're like most Arfcom bike haters... try riding a bike.
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 11:35:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/27/2014 7:18:24 PM EDT by borracho536]
Lots of good advice so far on procuring bikes if you dont already have them so I will skip that.
Regarding a century ride in your time frame...I think that is absolutely achievable assuming you guys are willing to put in the work. Spring of 2006 I  was in a low spot in my life where I lost my job and wasnt taking and classes that semester and gf just broke up with me. My dad asked me ~early April if I wanted to try doing a century with him...only kicker was it was in 6 weeks. I went from weighing 265lbs and basically being a couch potato to being a century failure 6 weeks later but I did make it to the 80 mile mark before I threw in the towel.  Eta: meant to add I dropped down to about 235 while training.

Having said all that, I think if I had a properly fitted bike and a few more weeks I'd have been fine.  Start slow on your training but you need to get to where you can ride 40-60 miles without an issue and more important than that you need to get your arse some callouses cause 100 miles takes a LONG time for an average rider.  Good luck op!
Link Posted: 1/27/2014 11:57:04 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Adamantium:
The self important, overly pretentious, douche-nozzles that wrote that up need their heads kicked in.
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I just find them funny and think most are at best! However, I think the hardcore cyclists just might believe in most of them!
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