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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 11/18/2012 1:34:36 PM EST
I am interested in learning sailing and as a guy with carpentry skills, I thought it would be very cool to build my own wooden starter boat. Anyone of you guys ever done such a thing? Anyone have any books or resources to recommend?
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:36:24 PM EST
Originally Posted By Powerkicker:
I am interested in learning sailing and as a guy with carpentry skills, I thought it would be very cool to build my own wooden starter boat. Anyone of you guys ever done such a thing? Anyone have any books or resources to recommend?



what type of boat are you looking to build? how much are you looking to spend?
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:38:21 PM EST
My father in law has taken a number of classes at the WoodenBoat School in Brooklyn, Maine. It sounds like a truly perfect way to learn.
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:39:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/18/2012 1:40:31 PM EST by AeroE]
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:42:19 PM EST
Nope.
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:43:10 PM EST
My dad built a cedar strip canoe when I was a kid.


We have a friend in Norway that builds wooden sailboats. Pretty cool workshop with all the forms and jigs and such.
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:44:32 PM EST
there was a guy here building a boat and the plans were named ar15 coincidently
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:46:35 PM EST
Sounds like fun, I would love to do it but already have to many unfinished projects. How big are you thinking? A two person sailboat wouldn't be to bad. My father built a 1 person boat, and I sailed it as a kid, but it depends where you plan to sail and what kind of waves you will face.
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:46:41 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:48:00 PM EST
if you are looking for a small sailboat, try the scamp.

It is 11'11" , difficult to capsize, and easy to right if you do capsize it without a righting line.

http://threesheetsnw.com/blog/2011/10/at-less-than-12-feet-scamp-boat-offers-big-features-in-a-tiny-package/


If you are looking for a skiff, I fucking love the brockway skiff. plans are online, and you can build it out of cheap lumber grade plywood and epoxy.
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:48:05 PM EST
Google Glen-L
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:48:42 PM EST
Originally Posted By Powerkicker:
I am interested in learning sailing and as a guy with carpentry skills, I thought it would be very cool to build my own wooden starter boat. Anyone of you guys ever done such a thing? Anyone have any books or resources to recommend?


References: Howard Chapelle's book on chesapeake boats; Robert Seward's Boatbuilding Manual; Jay Benford's Small Craft. Do yourself a favor, start small, build something that is hardchined and can be built out of plywood.
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:49:02 PM EST
Oh the tragidy
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:55:51 PM EST


I went to the link. It looks like it never got built and sailed
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 2:03:34 PM EST
You guys just beg for trouble don't you?
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 2:11:38 PM EST
Originally Posted By Colt_sporter:
You guys just beg for trouble don't you?


I think it sounds better to say I "love a challenge"
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 1:50:31 AM EST
I'm not building a boat but I am have my grandfathers boat restored.

It's been sitting for the last 35 years and my Dad finally said he wasn't going to do the resto.

It's a 1959 Thompson 20' offshore model. Has 2 45 horse Mercury's on the back. I've already rebuilt the engines.

The boat is made out of Mahogany






Link Posted: 11/20/2012 2:10:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By VarmitSniper:
I'm not building a boat but I am have my grandfathers boat restored.

It's been sitting for the last 35 years and my Dad finally said he wasn't going to do the resto.

It's a 1959 Thompson 20' offshore model. Has 2 45 horse Mercury's on the back. I've already rebuilt the engines.

The boat is made out of Mahogany



<a href="http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/593/tjhompson4.jpg/" target="_blank">http://img593.imageshack.us/img593/7100/tjhompson4.jpg</a>
<a href="http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/854/thompson2.jpg/" target="_blank">http://img854.imageshack.us/img854/5695/thompson2.jpg</a>
<a href="http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/690/thompson33.jpg/" target="_blank">http://img690.imageshack.us/img690/6875/thompson33.jpg</a>


cool
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 2:13:59 AM EST
Leroy Jethro Gibbs

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 2:15:02 AM EST
Originally Posted By Marcbme:
Google Glen-L


This.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 2:22:45 AM EST
I am building the ar15 linked above. It is way more work than I expected and life tends to get in the way. Ill start doing updates again when I get to work on it more regularly. As a new guy he hardest thing is not knowing what you really want (rigging, ect). I would suggest buying a small starter to see what you like. Probably cheaper too. I could not have been convinced not to build one though - some people are just stubborn.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 2:29:52 AM EST
You might want to consider a Whisp.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 2:30:00 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/20/2012 2:32:18 AM EST by NathanL]
Built a few over the years. For the first time get a set of plans (or even a kit) that caters to the homebuilders.

Glen-L is good.

http://www.clcboats.com/
Chesapeake light craft is another. They have a few sailing boats including a pretty nifty pocket cruiser. They might be close enough to you to drive and pick up a kit from them as well.

I've got a set of Bateau plans for a flats boat that is getting laid down sometime late spring as soon as I finish my teardrop camper which is my current build.


Link Posted: 11/20/2012 3:26:13 AM EST
Built a Selway-Fisher Chincoteage Skiff (17 feet) and modified the sail plan to the Coresound 17 (another good boat). Took me a solid 9 months of every spare minute I had.

The clinker or plank built boats done right will take at least a year. My skiff is plywood stitch and tape built; this building style takes a little less time but has it's own challenges.

If you want to go traditional, check the Wooden Boat forum. They are very snitty about plywood boats, however––if you want to try plywood check the Messing About forum.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 3:26:52 AM EST
Kayaks and canoes only. Sorry.

i can tell you that it is a great hobby and a great project.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 3:31:00 AM EST

Originally Posted By Chas:
Built a Selway-Fisher Chincoteage Skiff (17 feet) and modified the sail plan to the Coresound 17 (another good boat). Took me a solid 9 months of every spare minute I had.

The clinker or plank built boats done right will take at least a year. My skiff is plywood stitch and tape built; this building style takes a little less time but has it's own challenges.

If you want to go traditional, check the Wooden Boat forum. They are very snitty about plywood boats, however––if you want to try plywood check the Messing About forum.

They really should rename the forum (and to a lesser degree the magazine) Traditional Wooden Boat.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 3:32:23 AM EST
I have a client, Wooden Boat Store that sells books on the topic, and another that isn't sailboats, but this guy makes handcrafted boats, so possibly some inspiration for you Adirondack Guide Boat
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 3:35:59 AM EST
tag
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 3:42:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/20/2012 3:52:59 AM EST by Powderfinger]
Plywood stich and glue/composite construction is the way to go, unless you want to apprentice to an old school type building.
I've played with the notion and bought plans from Sam Devlin. The Egret and Winter Wren II
http://devlinboat.com/
I bought study plans for the Atkin Valgerda in this link. http://atkinboatplans.com/Sail/Valgerda.html.
Atkin has mostly old school type boats, but this one could be built in plywood.If I was to build, it would be the Valgerda. Not only seaworthy but has some WOW! factor IMO.
Also researched the Arch Davis Penobscot 14 and 17 footer.
http://www.archdavisdesigns.com/davis_penobscot14.html
I have not built one yet. If you want to learn to sail, buy a small boat and learn. The principles will be the same in a larger boat later. If you want to build a boat, you will spend more money and put off sailing for a year or two at least.
Wooden boat. com forums is the Ar15. com of wooden boats.
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