Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
PSA
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 12/10/2013 12:54:37 PM EDT
Is it possible to buy primed brass, powder, projectiles, scale, single stage press, bullet seating die, and reload? I'm looking to start off really simple.


looking to do 9, 40, 223, 308


Thanks
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 1:02:04 PM EDT
Get a few reloading manuals and do a lot of reading.
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 1:07:24 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/10/2013 1:08:23 PM EDT by AeroE]
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 1:17:11 PM EDT
Those all deal woth prepping/priming brass, I'm talking about dropping powder and projectiles into primed brass. Can anyone say yes or no if its possible?  Seems that half of reloading is prepping/priming brass.
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 1:21:55 PM EDT
I have been reading articles for hours but most turn reloading into a novel, I understand there can be a whole lot involved but want to start this way, if its possible.
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 1:32:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/10/2013 1:33:36 PM EDT by NavyIS2]
When buying primed brass you will usually have to run them through sizing dies anyways. Typically even great brass will come with a few dented case mouths. Reloading is unfortunately a time consuming hobby that can't really be made easier unless you have the money for a fully automated press and you still need a good understanding of the process then. I recommend just buying a food set that comes with most everything like the rock chucker set and read the manual. I was taught by my father in law, but still read several manuals before making my first round. Even then it was a nervous moment when I shot the first round.
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 1:36:11 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 1:38:30 PM EDT
Yes, it is possible to do what you are asking. You could theoretically purchase primed brass, drop a powder charge, and seat a bullet. However, your cost savings won't  be that great since you are continuously needing to buy brass. Normally you would be able to reuse your brass 5-7 times. A few weeks ago, I purchased a bag of 50 pieces of brand new Winchester brass. I tested all of them in my chamber and I could only get the bolt to close for about 6-7 of them so I had to resize them all in order to bump the shoulder back. Just because they are "new" doesn't mean that they are sized properly for your chamber. Yes, it sucks having to tumble, lube, resize, trim, etc. but thats part of the deal. If you don't understand the concept of resizing and what happens to the brass, you may not be able to overcome some of the typical issues that reloaders may experience when shooting their own ammo.
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 1:42:22 PM EDT
Yes, you can buy pre-sized and primed brass.  It's not generally inexpensive vs doing the prep, size and prime yourself, though.
Personally, I'd still be running them through a case gage if I had some brass pre-sized/primed.

Here's a link to pre-processed/primed 1k .223 brass...for $240(!!)
Currently brass prices are still somewhat high, but figure 8c/case + 3c/primer, would be $110/thousand.  Do the math, and make your choices.. :)
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 3:00:24 PM EDT
Yes. It's called hand loading. Buy the parts and load them yourself. Then, when you get a pile of brass, you can start cleaning, prepping and reusing it and you will be reloading.
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 3:16:07 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By baron66:
Yes. It's called hand loading. Buy the parts and load them yourself. Then, when you get a pile of brass, you can start cleaning, prepping and reusing it and you will be reloading.
View Quote

Hand loading is generally a term reserved for those of us who try to truley know and understand every step of the reloading process. Trying to get the mpst capability out of every round.
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 3:33:49 PM EDT
It might start out as simple and cheap but that part goes away really quick. To do it right you accumulate a lot of stuff for instance with powder your rifle might not like that particular powder then you end up buying a selection of powder. You can make ammo with simple tools but it might not be the best ammo suited for your rifle. However I only use a single stage set up and love it. I think i enjoy reloading just about as much as I do shooting. Best of luck to you.
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 6:31:55 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 7:44:25 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AeroE:


If you want to simply charge a pre sized and primed case with gunpowder then seat a bullet by using a recipe, then reloading is probably not for you.  You will not save much money by using the brass one time, maybe none.

You'll have to buy every single piece of equipment needed to go through the entire process, too.  A tumbler for cleaning brass is not mandatory, it's a nice accessory.

I haven't looked for primed brass for a long time.  I would not buy used brass that has been prepped and then primed unless it came from someone I knew.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AeroE:
Originally Posted By LS1BADLX:
I have been reading articles for hours but most turn reloading into a novel, I understand there can be a whole lot involved but want to start this way, if its possible.


If you want to simply charge a pre sized and primed case with gunpowder then seat a bullet by using a recipe, then reloading is probably not for you.  You will not save much money by using the brass one time, maybe none.

You'll have to buy every single piece of equipment needed to go through the entire process, too.  A tumbler for cleaning brass is not mandatory, it's a nice accessory.

I haven't looked for primed brass for a long time.  I would not buy used brass that has been prepped and then primed unless it came from someone I knew.


This sums it up but I want to add that reloading is not a casual hobby. Lots of time has to be put in in order to learn and fully understand what you are doing. Most people become obsessed

with chasing that perfect combo or saving money on their ammo for rare and/or pricey guns. You either take a full step in with both feet or don't come in at all.
Link Posted: 12/10/2013 10:06:45 PM EDT
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/405548/lee-3-hole-turret-press-with-manual-index

can this press use 4 hole turrets as well?
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 3:01:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 3:03:01 AM EDT by Taipan01]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LS1BADLX:
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/405548/lee-3-hole-turret-press-with-manual-index

can this press use 4 hole turrets as well?
View Quote


I don't think it will index properly with the four hole even if it will accept them. I had the older 4 hole turret prior to Lee changing things out (around 2006) and that one wouldn't accept the newer products without basically changing everything out. Also, it has the same base as my older one and spent primers are a pain. I ended up filling the holes in the base where the primers dropped into and under the press. You'd be much better off looking at the Lee classic 4 hole turret press. They pop up all the time on sale. To better answer your questions on Lee products, get Lees reloading manual. The front section is devoted to using Lee products and basic reloading in general before making the plunge on purchasing.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:05:57 AM EDT
As stated above, if you are going to "buy" new brass and use it once you will not be saving any money especially if you have purchase all the Handloading equipment to get started.  The whole reloading concept is based on saving and reusing the fired case.  It would be much cheaper for you to purchase factory ammo and forget about handloading.

Rem primed 223 brass is about $40/100
Powder is about $10/100
Bullets are about $25/100

That comes to $75/100 rounds or $15/box of 20.  You can purchase a lot of cheap 223 ammo for a lot less than $15/20.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 4:50:58 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By steve4102:
As stated above, if you are going to "buy" new brass and use it once you will not be saving any money especially if you have purchase all the Handloading equipment to get started.  The whole reloading concept is based on saving and reusing the fired case.  It would be much cheaper for you to purchase factory ammo and forget about handloading.

Rem primed 223 brass is about $40/100
Powder is about $10/100
Bullets are about $25/100

That comes to $75/100 rounds or $15/box of 20.  You can purchase a lot of cheap 223 ammo for a lot less than $15/20.
View Quote


Palmetto jad the hornady 6000 bullets for $499, much less than $25/100. Thanks
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:29:56 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LS1BADLX:


Palmetto jad the hornady 6000 bullets for $499, much less than $25/100. Thanks
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LS1BADLX:
Originally Posted By steve4102:
As stated above, if you are going to "buy" new brass and use it once you will not be saving any money especially if you have purchase all the Handloading equipment to get started.  The whole reloading concept is based on saving and reusing the fired case.  It would be much cheaper for you to purchase factory ammo and forget about handloading.

Rem primed 223 brass is about $40/100
Powder is about $10/100
Bullets are about $25/100

That comes to $75/100 rounds or $15/box of 20.  You can purchase a lot of cheap 223 ammo for a lot less than $15/20.


Palmetto jad the hornady 6000 bullets for $499, much less than $25/100. Thanks


Yup that's a good price and that brings your price to about $12/box of 20.  Still more than you can purchase cheap factory ammo for.

Are you really going to purchase 6000 pieces of New Primed brass, just so you can load them once?
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 5:35:09 AM EDT
LS1, it seems you already have your mind made up. All any of us can do is give caution. The advice on here comes from a collaboration of years of different experiences in reloading. None of us are trying to sell you anything or have any profit to make on you buying something more. We are just trying to tell you the safest and easiest way to go about reloading. We have all tried different ways to cut cost, improve accuracy, produce custom hunting loads, and a few on here have even helped in developing new rounds all together.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 10:38:52 AM EDT
Reloading pistol ammo is really easy.  There is almost no brass prep.  You basically get the grit off of them (dont even need a vibratory or tumble cleaner, soap and water works), run them through a carbide sizer that knocks out the old primer, and put a new primer in.  You don't even *need* to clean revolver brass if it does not touch the ground... but I still would.

Get yourself something like the lee classic turret press or a progressive and it all happens on the press while you drop powder, seat a bullet, and crimp.  It adds very little extra work.

Rifle brass is a different story.  Lots more prep work.  You can pick up primed 223 and 308 brass as they are available due to pull down military ammo, but you pay a premium for it.  If you are not going to reuse your rifle brass, I don't know if there will be much of a difference between buying primed brass, powder, and bullets vs bulk loaded ammo.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 12:47:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2013 4:43:37 PM EDT by Trollslayer]
Originally Posted By LS1BADLX:
Is it possible... ?  
View Quote



Yes, it is. (a simple answer to your straight forward question).


Get started in any way in which you feel comfortable.
Link Posted: 12/11/2013 3:08:17 PM EDT
There is a seller in the EE that sells primed brass, you will of course pay dearly for it. It defeats one of the principles of why people reload which is cost. Others have already pointed this out. Everything you've mentioned points to the fact that reloading really isn't recommended for why you want to get into it.
Top Top