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Posted: 7/22/2013 2:59:50 PM EST
Last time I built an AR was over 20 years ago, and I know I made some mistakes then (never mind what...at least it functioned when I was done!) I never knew then if I was supposed to put anti-seize on the upper receiver threads before installing the barrel. So, I am asking now: anti-seize, or no?
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 3:01:20 PM EST
Yes. It's a good idea . Are you going with a free float rail ?
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 3:04:36 PM EST
i would put it on the barrel and in the upper to make install easier but not on the barrel threads.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 3:15:12 PM EST
No. Just use regular wheel bearing grease that you can buy at the auto parts store.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 3:20:47 PM EST
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Originally Posted By BostonLarger:
No. Just use regular wheel bearing grease that you can buy at the auto parts store.
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Quit it. Let him use what he wants.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 3:22:59 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/22/2013 3:28:43 PM EST by Direct-Drive]
Anti-seize is what they use in conventional gunsmithing.
The M16/M4 Tech Manual specifies moly-fortified grease.
https://www.ucwrg.com/materiel/weapon-lubrication/18/aeroshell-33ms-grease/


Edit:
The "auto parts house" gang use it for personal lubrication and like the larger quantities available there.


Link Posted: 7/22/2013 3:43:24 PM EST
here we go.......again LOL


just get some aeroshell 33ms. it's the preferred grease of ARFCOM.

it does what it's supposed to do, and with one tube your great grandchildren will still have some left over to assemble a bunch of uppers.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 3:45:24 PM EST
+1 on Aeroshell, at least per the "manual"
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 3:53:16 PM EST
I assembled an upper a couple of months ago and I used Aeroshell 33MS.

One of my good friends was an armorer in the Army (he recently got out) and he said that's all they use in the arms room.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 4:28:56 PM EST
Go to the link Direct Drive provided, send them $5, get 1/2 oz of a product that meets MIL-G specs for assembling barrels onto uppers, and call it done. No reason to screw around with "maybe this will work" or "nobody I know has had their gun dissolve from using this other stuff". Seriously, get the stuff from Umbrella Corp and do it right.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 4:30:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/22/2013 4:31:40 PM EST by JmPnTX]
Aeroshell 33 MS grease is what's specified. Any moly (molybdenum) fortified grease will probably do. Avoid anything with graphite in it.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 11:51:01 PM EST
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Originally Posted By okiejack:
Yes. It's a good idea . Are you going with a free float rail ?
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No, standard A2 handguards and 20" heavy barrel.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 11:58:33 PM EST
Thanks, all, for the replies. I just ordered the small quantity of Aeroshell from the link above. Like I said, I made a number of mistakes on my first build, and I am trying not to repeat them by having the proper tools and materials this time.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 6:05:43 AM EST
Originally Posted By Steeltalons:
Last time I built an AR was over 20 years ago, and I know I made some mistakes then (never mind what...at least it functioned when I was done!) I never knew then if I was supposed to put anti-seize on the upper receiver threads before installing the barrel. So, I am asking now: anti-seize, or no?
View Quote


Aeroshell 33 grease, or equivalent containing no graphite!
Anti seize contains graphite
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:53:21 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Steeltalons:
Thanks, all, for the replies. I just ordered the small quantity of Aeroshell from the link above. Like I said, I made a number of mistakes on my first build, and I am trying not to repeat them by having the proper tools and materials this time.
View Quote


Put a dab of it on your hammer/trigger engagement surfaces too.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 6:25:51 AM EST
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Originally Posted By strat81:


Put a dab of it on your hammer/trigger engagement surfaces too.
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Originally Posted By strat81:
Originally Posted By Steeltalons:
Thanks, all, for the replies. I just ordered the small quantity of Aeroshell from the link above. Like I said, I made a number of mistakes on my first build, and I am trying not to repeat them by having the proper tools and materials this time.


Put a dab of it on your hammer/trigger engagement surfaces too.

Good adevice ^^^

I also use it on muzzle threads, RE threads, detent grooves and to lube roll pins before driving.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 6:36:31 AM EST
Do yourself a favor and just buy the correct grease which is as stated above, AeroShell 33MS. Check the EE here, there was a member selling it or buy it from the link provided above. This grease is cheap and readily available so there's no reason to use anything else.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 3:52:20 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By RMS556:
Do yourself a favor and just buy the correct grease which is as stated above, AeroShell 33MS. Check the EE here, there was a member selling it or buy it from the link provided above. This grease is cheap and readily available so there's no reason to use anything else.
View Quote

As I mentioned above, I DID order some.
Link Posted: 7/25/2013 2:01:10 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By strat81:
Put a dab of it on your hammer/trigger engagement surfaces too.
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.......it quiets squeaky doors quite nicely also
Link Posted: 7/25/2013 8:33:29 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Steeltalons:
Thanks, all, for the replies. I just ordered the small quantity of Aeroshell from the link above. Like I said, I made a number of mistakes on my first build, and I am trying not to repeat them by having the proper tools and materials this time.
View Quote

Best choice IMO. Proven by the military in millions of weapons for decades in most every imaginable environment on the planet.
Link Posted: 7/25/2013 3:34:24 PM EST
Now, do I actually put it on the receiver threads, or on the barrel where it goes into the receiver, or both?

Also, I know the torque spec on the barrel nut is supposed to be something around 30 lb/ft (what exactly is it, please?), but what do I do if I get to that point and the nearest "notch" doesn't quite line up with the hole for the gas tube? Tighten it until it lines up, or loosen it?
Link Posted: 7/25/2013 9:05:15 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Steeltalons:
Now, do I actually put it on the receiver threads, or on the barrel where it goes into the receiver, or both?

Also, I know the torque spec on the barrel nut is supposed to be something around 30 lb/ft (what exactly is it, please?), but what do I do if I get to that point and the nearest "notch" doesn't quite line up with the hole for the gas tube? Tighten it until it lines up, or loosen it?
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Torque is 30-80 ft-lbs. I put a nice coat of Aeroshell 33MS on the barrel extension, on the barrel nut threads, and on the receiver threads. I then set the wrench to 45 ft-lbs. and tighten until the barrel nut aligns with the gas tube. Then I break torque and do the process two more times.

If the barrel nut does not align with the gas tube, increase the poundage in 10 or 15 lb. increments until it lines up (not to exceed 80 ft.- lbs.).

Hope this helps.
Link Posted: 7/25/2013 11:44:24 PM EST
30 - 80ft lbs .....you know a new member here sent me pm's and actually used the recommended ft lbs 32 to 38ft lbs, and it wouldn't align, he then used I think X2 .001 shims and it all worked out..barrel shims, they are made so you don't go past the recommended torque range.

The books that say 80ft lbs, is like saying.....hey "If you go any further you will probably break "X" amount of items.

Link Posted: 7/26/2013 5:32:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/26/2013 5:34:14 AM EST by PFC]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Steeltalons:
Now, do I actually put it on the receiver threads, or on the barrel where it goes into the receiver, or both?

Also, I know the torque spec on the barrel nut is supposed to be something around 30 lb/ft (what exactly is it, please?), but what do I do if I get to that point and the nearest "notch" doesn't quite line up with the hole for the gas tube? Tighten it until it lines up, or loosen it?
View Quote

I typically use XF-7 on the BE, but very light coat of whatever you use.
Generous amount on the upper’s threads, the threads of the nut, and where the nut clamps/contacts the barrel assmb.

Never back off unless you back completely off and start over.
For final line up I set the torque wrench to 80 and go until the nut lines up or the wrench clicks.
Read the TM.
Link Posted: 7/26/2013 1:11:41 PM EST

Did anyone notice the disclaimer on the Umbrella Corp site?

*Not suitable for personal lubrication.
Link Posted: 7/26/2013 1:31:53 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Avidrook:

Did anyone notice the disclaimer on the Umbrella Corp site?

*Not suitable for personal lubrication.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Avidrook:

Did anyone notice the disclaimer on the Umbrella Corp site?

*Not suitable for personal lubrication.

Back in post #5...

Originally Posted By Direct-Drive:
Anti-seize is what they use in conventional gunsmithing.
The M16/M4 Tech Manual specifies moly-fortified grease.
https://www.ucwrg.com/materiel/weapon-lubrication/18/aeroshell-33ms-grease/


Edit:
The "auto parts house" gang use it for personal lubrication and like the larger quantities available there.




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