Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 12/24/2002 2:26:20 PM EDT
Can someone tell me how to remove the connector assembly from an M1A Springfield? I have the field manual & I can't even find it in the reciever!
Tks.

Link Posted: 12/24/2002 2:29:39 PM EDT
The connector assembly is/was used only in the selective-fire M14; don't bother looking, 'cause it isn't there.
Link Posted: 12/24/2002 4:10:33 PM EDT
Thankyou.Than how do you remove the operating rod? It has one of those!
Link Posted: 12/24/2002 8:08:16 PM EDT
since you seem to be a novice with the M1A.. my advice is for you to get Scott Duff's M-14/M1A Owners Guide.. it can be found at Fulton Armory's site as well as Bill Ricca's and Amazon.com has the book as well.. it's around $20 and is a necessity, in my opinion, for the novice on care, feeding, cleaning, and tear-down of said weapon...
Link Posted: 12/24/2002 9:31:52 PM EDT
Thanks for the advice. I need this info on how to remove the op rod spring & guide to replace the heatshield. I'll get that book. You guys are great!
Link Posted: 12/25/2002 12:20:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/25/2002 1:10:47 AM EDT by Kissel]
I think you mean the connector lock. It is the small round bar on the underside of the receiver that slides and locks the operating rod spring guide into place. It has a roll pin that just pulls out.

To remove the operating rod, first remove the op rod spring guide and spring. To do that. move the connector lock toward the outside of the receiver so it disengages the spring guide. Then, push the spring guide forward with your thumb and lift it up, away from the reciever. Be careful because it is under tension from the op rod spring.

Move the op rod rearward until the handle lines up with the rear sight base. Then pull the op rod away from the reciever and it should disengage from the bolt roller. You may need to jiggle it around a bit to get it in the correct position--sometimes it helps to sort-of rotate the op rod away from the receiver in a small arc motion. Once you do it the first time, you've got it. DO NOT give in to the temptation to use a screwdriver to pry the operating rod away from the receiver.
Best of luck until you get the book. In the meantime, go to the Fulton Armory website and look at the M1A/M14 FAQ.

Check this out:
www.chestnutridge.com/14pic.asp
Link Posted: 12/25/2002 6:39:43 AM EDT
Merry Christmas. You guys a full of onfo!
Pulling out that roll pin was the hardest part.
I have replaced the handguard/heat shield.
Now, on the fiberglass stock there is a raised area or nub that pushes on the rear of the trigger assembly that prevents the sear from holding the hammer back when the bolt is cycled while the trigger is kept to the rear. The hammer just follows the bolt forward.
I see that on the wooden stock that area is smoothed flat. What is the best choice for relieving that area? Maybe a Dremel tool or a file? What do you all think?
MJ
Link Posted: 12/25/2002 2:03:44 PM EDT
You lost me on that one!
Link Posted: 12/25/2002 6:50:27 PM EDT
On the fiberglass stock the area behind the trigger assembly is not flat like it is on the wooden stock. The fiberglass stock has a raised area that causes the hammer to follow the bolt forward when the trigger is held back after the first round is fired. The hammer will cock if the trigger is forward but will not engage the sear agin if it is held back while the bolt cycles. Both my fiberglass stocks have this projection but the wooden stock (which functions fine) does not.
I will have to smooth down the hump to match the flat area on the wooden stoc & I think it is best to use a dremel tool to flatten it out.
I am suprised no one else has encountered this problem w/ a GI stock.
I hope to modify the stock on Thur so I should have a full report that eve.
Thanks for the advice.
MJ out!
Link Posted: 12/27/2002 3:34:44 PM EDT
After I rubbed the nub down with the Dremel tool nothing changed. So I took it to my smith & paid him $50 to fit the stock.
He had to sand down the top of the stock to get the reciever closer to the trigger group. The bolt wasn't pushing the hammer down far enough to engage the reset. I'm suprised no one else has had the same problem. As both my fiberglass stocks didn't work.
Thanks for all the advise.
Link Posted: 12/27/2002 7:08:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/27/2002 7:23:38 PM EDT by phish]
Hope everyone had a great X-Mas! I'm also an M1A newbie myself but Santa gave me not only Scott Duff's book, but Kuhnhausen's shop manual as well! Both are really excellent books, especially Kuhnhausen's "Chilton".

I also found removing the op-rod difficult at first, Springfield gives it a nice tight fit but I was able to get it out with my fingers; I guess it just took practice on my part.

"The operating rod disassembly notch on Springfield Armory, Inc. M1A receivers is slightly different than G.I. M1 receivers or Armscorp M14 receivers. This can cause difficulty in removing the operating rod if unaware of the difference." (Duff, p.112)

He writes on the use of a screwdriver, but finger pressure can get it out just as well.
Link Posted: 12/28/2002 2:44:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By MJDJ:
After I rubbed the nub down with the Dremel tool nothing changed. So I took it to my smith & paid him $50 to fit the stock.
He had to sand down the top of the stock to get the reciever closer to the trigger group. The bolt wasn't pushing the hammer down far enough to engage the reset. I'm suprised no one else has had the same problem. As both my fiberglass stocks didn't work.
Thanks for all the advise.



Now I understand. I just took a look at a fiberglass stock and it does appear to have a little bit of a raised area around the rear of the receiver opening, but I've never had a problem with it. Interesting, though, because you would assume that the fiberglass stocks would have greater dimensional uniformity from one to the next with greater variation in wood stocks. I suspect that the problem was one of compatibility between your receiver and trigger group. I have had that problem before---one trigger group locks up and another doesn't, or locks too tightly. I had one group that locked so tightly that the hammer wouldn't follow the bolt. Live and learn.
Top Top