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Posted: 2/15/2002 11:39:21 PM EDT
I am going to start building a 10/22 target rifle. I want a heavy barrel and was wondering if you think the Volquartsen's high price is justified. I am sure they are great but they can probably outshoot me and after all we are talking about a .22 here. What do you think of butler creek, green mountain, hogue and volquartsen barrels. Keep in mind you are giving suggestions to a broke college student that cannot curb his appetite for new toys.
Link Posted: 2/16/2002 12:50:50 AM EDT
If you plan on running "Eley 10X" ammo threw the rifle, then the answer is Yes.

If your going to shoot Thunderbolt ammo in the rifle, then don't waste your money.

Also, I give you a little hint, As long as you buy a 10/22 with out the front band, don't even bother buying a new barrel and stock. The single problem with the Ruger barrel is that it is held in the rifle with a V-clamp only. If you float the barrel, all you are doing is losing barrel support, which changes POA.

I have taken stock rifles, glassed them in, and worked the triggers. The rifles will shoot .75" at 50Yds using standard ammo(read cheap). If you feel compelled to spend money, then just buy the 10/22T in SS with the lam stock. Then all you will need is a pack of Accuglass.
Link Posted: 2/16/2002 6:44:33 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dano523:
If you plan on running "Eley 10X" ammo threw the rifle, then the answer is Yes.

If your going to shoot Thunderbolt ammo in the rifle, then don't waste your money.

Also, I give you a little hint, As long as you buy a 10/22 with out the front band, don't even bother buying a new barrel and stock. The single problem with the Ruger barrel is that it is held in the rifle with a V-clamp only. If you float the barrel, all you are doing is losing barrel support, which changes POA.

I have taken stock rifles, glassed them in, and worked the triggers. The rifles will shoot .75" at 50Yds using standard ammo(read cheap). If you feel compelled to spend money, then just buy the 10/22T in SS with the lam stock. Then all you will need is a pack of Accuglass.




My 10/22T shoots .75" at 50 yards with standard ammo, and has shot well under .5" (I have one ten shot group smaller than a dime!) with Tenex, and is not glass bedded. I highly recommend this rifle to anyone who wants an accurate .22LR semi that does not have a match chamber. Tenex or any other quality match ammo does get expensive, and unless you're competing with the rifle, I don't think it's worth the cost.
Link Posted: 2/16/2002 8:58:28 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/16/2002 10:25:33 AM EDT
I have a Ruger 10/22 Deluxe Sporter with a Walnut Stock. The barrel is free floating, but not exactly heavy. I can get under 1" groups free handed at 50 yards using std. ammo. With RWS match, I can shrink them to 0.75". The stock Ruger 10/22 with a free floating barrel is a great rifle for plinking or killing squirrels/rabbits. If you're buying a whole new rifle though, the Volquartsen is a great gun. However, it is $1000 minimum I think.

Gus's rec of the 10/22T is not a bad idea unless you want a special McMillen stock or something. However, nothing beats a Volquartsen hands down. Those guns can take target ammo and make groups down to around 0.2-0.35" spreads.

themao
Link Posted: 2/16/2002 11:20:25 AM EDT
I replaced a Midway heavy barrel with a Volsq. carbon fiber and stainless barrel. I did this to reduce the weight. The rifle was no fun to shoot except off the bench. My Volsq. is much lighter, but no more accurate than, the Midway was. Also, you cannot use a cleaning rod on the Volsq. barrel. You have to make a pull through. A twin of my rifle is on the opening page at www.rimfirecentral.com
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