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Posted: 12/7/2001 9:46:02 PM EDT
http://www.gunbroker.com/auction/ViewItem.asp?Item=2603460
very cool upper/lower
Link Posted: 12/7/2001 9:52:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/7/2001 10:13:24 PM EDT
Is copper too soft for an upper?
Link Posted: 12/7/2001 10:25:13 PM EDT
Probably too soft but real heavy for sure .
Link Posted: 12/7/2001 10:46:10 PM EDT
Cool, yes.

It is unfortunately, NOT a pre-ban even if it was made before the ban. It was never assembled as a rifle, so it is not grandfathered.

Link Posted: 12/7/2001 11:05:27 PM EDT
Is copper too soft for an upper?

according to the post its not solid copper but an alloy " copper berilium"

im betting theres very little weight difference and it's most likely stronger than garden variety t-6

btw i thought berillium was a stragatic material like titanium used to be and not available to the public.

it would be fun to put together though



Link Posted: 12/7/2001 11:11:52 PM EDT
Yes, it's not copper. If I'm not mistaken, I have no degree in metallurgy, I believe I read that copper beryllium is heavy and brittle. So it won't mar, but it will chip.
Link Posted: 12/7/2001 11:12:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/7/2001 11:05:58 PM EDT by slt223]

Originally Posted By po89mm:
Is copper too soft for an upper?

according to the post its not solid copper but an alloy " copper berilium"

im betting theres very little weight difference and it's most likely stronger than garden variety t-6

btw i thought berillium was a stragatic material like titanium used to be and not available to the public.

it would be fun to put together though






Beryllium is used to reflect neutrons in thermo nuclear devices.
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 1:38:05 AM EDT
It's also a health hazard as a dust, so grinding or polishing this thing would be a no-no. I wonder why it was made.
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 2:50:09 AM EDT
Leave it out in the rain for 50 years and it will begin to develop a very pleasing copper patina.
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 4:24:53 AM EDT
That sure is pretty. If you used walnut furniture complete with brass tacks it would look like a high tech Henry or M1866 Winchester..... I've been considering a Tannery Shop lower & the aluminum/bronze or copper/magnesium lower really are tempting. Tannery also does a 80% A1 upper in copper/mag but not in aluminum/bronze.
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 4:34:21 AM EDT
I used to machine this stuff years ago. Big health hazard and it is brittle. I've had it break during machining. (my screw-up) I don't remember it being that much lighter than copper. Can't imagine it being the best material for a receiver. We used it for a Government contract. As I remember they sent use the material. If it is restricted material then that's one more reason not to use it. Can you imagine being busted because your rifle is made of a resticted metal? I can see it now,"Local gun nut arrested with evil high capacity semi-automatic black machine gun made from highly sensative secret material stolen from the govenment! Reports say he was within 10 miles of a school and may have had it in his trunk on Halloween!"
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 5:02:49 AM EDT
No trigger guard holes?

Kharn
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 6:49:20 AM EDT
Am I the only one who notice how ugly that is? It looks like someone sanded all the finish off a normal upper/lower with some coarse sand paper.
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 7:19:11 AM EDT
I am not sure that berilium is a controlled material. I have seen non-sparking/ non-magnetic tools made from the stuff. Second the health hazard, you don't want to inhale the dust from working with this stuff.
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 9:02:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 9:47:53 PM EDT
Don't Titleists's new wedges have a berillium insert?
Link Posted: 12/8/2001 10:07:08 PM EDT
I saw one of those recevers at the GRB gun show today, it is heavy.
SSD
Link Posted: 12/9/2001 9:07:10 AM EDT
Beryllium copper is used in a variety of industrial applications. The one I'm most familiar with is high-current electrical interconnect.

Beryllium copper needs to be heat treated to achieve any level of hardness, but it's relatively easy to heat treat. Once treated it can achieve good hardness and at the same time retain "springiness". Depends on how long you leave it at the correct temp. Too long and it gets too hard and embrittles. Too hot and it does the same only faster. A few years ago AMP Connectors bought a company in Fremont CA that had a lock on this technology. I knew the guys that started the original company and they were some pretty smart dudes.

If heat treated correctly a beryllium copper casting or forging could make a reliable if heavy part.
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