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Posted: 5/4/2003 3:58:18 PM EDT
I am looking for an at-home, correspondence type, gunsmithing school. Anyone know of one?
Link Posted: 5/6/2003 10:46:32 AM EDT
Foley-Belsaw offers one:

www.gunsmithingschool.com

Also AGI has a video course, but I don't think it's very interactive. Back when I used to get the American Gunsmith newsletter, I could have sworn they offered a "real" correspondence course, but I can't seem to find it now.

www.americangunsmith.com
Link Posted: 5/11/2003 10:00:54 PM EDT
I hate to tell you, but there's no such thing. I attended Trinidad State Junior College, graduated in 1990, and just recently taught there for 3 years.

Here is an example of a home study course -

Take a ball peen hammer, swing it in a 42 Deg arc, and hit the pin with between 4-5 ft pds of force.

There is no substitute for someone showing you how to do that. Plus, there is no way that you can afford all the tools and equipment you need to learn gunsmithing.

If you want to be a gunsmith, you need to decide to attend a good school. At least attend some summer classes to see if it's what you really want. Check the NRA's web page for gunsmithing schools that offer summer classes.

Murray State College in Tishomingo, OK has the best full program right now. Sad to say, TSJC has fell way back. It used to be the best.

Thanks,
Lee
www.thearmsroom.com
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 11:24:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ken_mays:
Foley-Belsaw offers one:

www.gunsmithingschool.com

Also AGI has a video course, but I don't think it's very interactive. Back when I used to get the American Gunsmith newsletter, I could have sworn they offered a "real" correspondence course, but I can't seem to find it now.

www.americangunsmith.com




Based on the info in this thread I ordered the info kit from Foley-Belsaw. I was not impressed. For $600 they send you 4 videos, a small screwdriver set, a brass hammer, and 200 business cards you can personalize by writing your name on them (Woo Hoo!). I consider myself a pretty rank amatuer gunsmith, and I already know how to do everything they "teach" in the first three videos. I believe I can find a better use for $600.
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 12:32:14 AM EDT
I just finished up Gunsmithing from Foley-Belsaw Institute March 18, 2003. I found the course fairly good for the beginner. The books that come with the course has far more info than what the 4 VHS's have. Does it rate to a 4 year collage degree with hands on? No, it doesn't. However I say it does give you what you pay for. I will be opening my Gunsmithing shop with in the year. During that time I will be honing my skills. Over all I am happy with it.

Dave Dee
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 5:41:12 AM EDT
I am a Gunsmith fulltime. I went about it like this:

I'm practically obsessed with firearms from the get-go. No other non gun related hobbies. I'm not into any other sports or activities.

READ everything you can get your hands on on the subject. BUY evry assembly disassembly book you can. The next part is tricky- do an apprenticeship under a gunsmith in your spare time, offering your help for free if they will teach you. I did that for 4 years. There is nothing quite like hands on experience!

A college machinist course would help also if you don't have those basic skills already.


Balming
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 10:27:25 AM EDT
I didn't put this in my post late last night. But it really comes down to what you desire to get out of the education. If you just want self knowledge on how to better work on your own firearms. Then most of the at home Gunsmith courses will do that very well. If your looking at going to work for a big name firearms maker, I.E., Remington, Ruger, Winchester, ect. Then the at home study course will not cover all the bases.

As Balming is stating doing sometime as an apprentice to an already practicing Gunsmith is a great way to learn hands on. Also getting a nice library of firearm dismantling books or CDROMs will be a big help and go a long ways.

When it comes to the large equipment almost any hardware store carries them. Also about 75% of the hand tools you will need to get also can be found now days at most hardware stores at cheaper than "Gunsmithing" tool outlets. There are also some tools that you can build yourself. Some tools and tools sets you might only use once every 5 years. These tools can be gotten as you need them. When it comes to gun vices be it just to hold a firearm why you work or clean them, or shooting vices to use for sighting in firearms, these can either be built yourself or bought pre-made. Which will save money for beginners. Also benches, work or shooting benches, can be self built and will save money. For those who are going to try to start their own Gunsmithing business, your own garage might work for starters. This depends on your state and local laws. If your going to also have your own business as a gunsmith you will have to get a Dealers FFL. It all takes time and money to get started.

So either way you look at it, if your going to do home study, apprenticeship or a full collage. It will take money and time to get everything started. Also helps if you can find a town or city were there is not already a huge number of gunsmith in business.

Dave Dee
Link Posted: 5/21/2003 12:41:08 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/21/2003 12:41:47 AM EDT by IMHO]
I'd never trust anything of mine to anyone who learned his/her trade from a correspondence course alone.
No credibility, IMHO.
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