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Posted: 2/24/2006 5:35:20 PM EDT
What are the benefits of a ported shotgun barrel?
Can it be done to any barrel?
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 5:57:40 PM EDT
In my opinion, porting does not reduce recoil, it redirects it. In my experience it significantly increases muzzle blast. And muzzle blast is more than just visible flash. It is the flash you see and the force (shock wave) you feel. Porting is also generally unpleasant to anyone standing to either side of you. It also greatly increases cleaning maintenance time.

But by redirecting the recoil and pushing the barrel down, in theory you should be able to keep the gun on target better.

However, by not allowing the muzzle to rise and complete the natural recoil arc/cycle, you could also, in theory, increase felt recoil straight back into the shoulder.

Basically I don't like it for most of the reasons listed above. But many others swear by it. You probably can't form an informed opinion until you actually shoot one with porting. To each his own.

I think it can be done to pretty much any barrel. You wouldn't be able to have the ports all the way out toward the muzzle on a gun with screw in chokes.
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 3:34:08 AM EDT
Everyone with the Vang Comp System I've heard seems to love it.
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 10:51:59 AM EDT
In theory it should reduce felt recoil slightly due to less gasses coming out of the end of the barrel and creating thrust. I have seen it worked out mathematically to between almost none to the 10 %>
I did a lot of research on it my self. I have talked to many Experts about it. This is my conclusions. Does it help yes. BUT most of it is designed wrong. You are wanting to keep the barrel from rising so you are putting ports in the side. Does this mak a lot of sense. In research I found that Every port that is straight up is equal to 2 ports on the side. That is just the first row of ports as the further down you go the less effective they are. I also found that by having the ports straight up reduces the noise as it goes more up. On my current shotgun I have 25 ports. 10 of them straight up. Most of them in the rows next to the top and a few further down. It does a great job of keeping muzlleclimb down. In fast it is almost nill. I have been working on one that will have 12 ports on top, 8 in the next row down, then 2, then 1. The idea when the preassure is high to have most of it vented straight up. As the pressure reduces your port volume (or number) has to increase to increase scavaging. This should decrease further the amount of gas blowing out the end and increasing pattern density by having less gas blow throught the shot column. Remember that the farther down the barrel the ports are the more benefit they are. This is all based on 18-20 inch barrells.
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 5:30:27 PM EDT
Wow very informative guys thanks
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 6:47:17 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 7:37:16 PM EDT
My experiences with both ported and non ported is the ported ones are louder. I don't notice any reduction in recoil. The barrels are harder to clean too with all those holes.
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 5:30:09 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 5:33:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tacman556:
In my opinion, porting does not reduce recoil, it redirects it. In my experience it significantly increases muzzle blast. And muzzle blast is more than just visible flash. It is the flash you see and the force (shock wave) you feel. Porting is also generally unpleasant to anyone standing to either side of you. It also greatly increases cleaning maintenance time.

But by redirecting the recoil and pushing the barrel down, in theory you should be able to keep the gun on target better.

However, by not allowing the muzzle to rise and complete the natural recoil arc/cycle, you could also, in theory, increase felt recoil straight back into the shoulder.

Basically I don't like it for most of the reasons listed above. But many others swear by it. You probably can't form an informed opinion until you actually shoot one with porting. To each his own.


I think it can be done to pretty much any barrel. You wouldn't be able to have the ports all the way out toward the muzzle on a gun with screw in chokes.



This person knows what they are talking about. You sir are a sporting clay shooter....

Slug-O-Matic/ Nsca Master/536121
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 6:01:19 AM EDT
I despise ported shotguns. Personal preference. It usually blows stuff in my face and If I forget to wear my glasses it stings. Ports suck. YMMV
Link Posted: 2/27/2006 7:07:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Slug-O:

This person knows what they are talking about. You sir are a sporting clay shooter....

Slug-O-Matic/ Nsca Master/536121



Actually I am not a sporting clays shooter, but I do appreciate the compliment. I do shoot birds, both live and clay, occasionally with my 1187 Premier but nothing serious. Most of my shotgun experience is with tactical 870s. I am a believer in the Vang Comp back boring and forcing cone lengthing...but not in their porting. Thankfully you can have one without the other.
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