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Posted: 12/29/2005 5:01:55 AM EDT
Im looking at getting my first shotgun and have been lurking around this section of the site for a little bit. I've read most of the post and went through the entire picture thread. I have noticed that a lot of people have the Remington 870. This was also recommended to me by the local gun shop here in town, but i thought i'd do a little research. I like the looks of being able to add a colapsible stock, and vertical foregrip on a rail. Is it pretty safe to say that I will be good to go with any 870 whether it be the PM or the express. Or am i going to run into problems as far as customizing with one model. Also are there any other models that you would suggest. Im going to be primarly using this for HD along with my AR. But will be taking it into the hills for fun. Im just looking to make a bad ass second gun to keep my lonely AR company.

The reason i am weary of the 870 is because it seems like a popular shotgun but its only $300. and im not sure how it compares to the Nova, or a FN i saw NIB for 349.

Thank you very much for your help in advance
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 5:18:55 AM EDT
If you want to spend a lot of money on a great shotgun, buy the $300 870 and send me another $300. Just kidding of course. The point is that the Remington 870 is a great shotgun. There are many, many 870 models/variations available. Thus, depending on where you live and shop, you can purchase new 870s starting around $275 and going as high as maybe $600 or more for an 870P Max.

Benelli, Winchester, Mossburg, FN and others also make good shotguns.

Figure out what features and characteristics you want and you intended use and then look at price. It helps if you can shoot a few different models to see which has controls that you like. Each shotgun has different placements of such things as safeties, action releases, etc.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 5:23:55 AM EDT
If you want "bad ass" then have a look at this one. I just ordered one to keep my little blackie company.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 5:34:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ManekiNeko:
If you want to spend a lot of money on a great shotgun, buy the $300 870 and send me another $300. Just kidding of course. The point is that the Remington 870 is a great shotgun. There are many, many 870 models/variations available. Thus, depending on where you live and shop, you can purchase new 870s starting around $275 and going as high as maybe $600 or more for an 870P Max.



Well.....I for sure want an 18 in barrel. Im not too worried if its wood or synthetic cause i plan on changing out those pieces anyways, so which ever is cheaper. So i kind of assume that im really looking at the 870 Express 18" And im not too sure i like the way it looks with the mag extension. I like the 5 shot one. Well at least the one on top of the picture on the Remington website under the Express 18".

This is what i want to do except not in tan, and with an 18in barrel:

http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=6&f=1&t=189762
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 8:27:51 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 9:56:20 AM EDT
Do a little shopping around and ask a lot of questions at the dealers that stock and can order Remington 870's. Chances are you will find a Remington shotgun configured with all the enhancements you want at the factory. It will save you money to buy the shotgun already set up compared to just buying one and adding stuff yourself. If you dig around online, check Remington dealers. You will see a lot of factory Remington models that Remington does not display on their various websites.

Also, find somebody that has a shotgun set up with an AR-style stock and shoot it before you get one yourself. You may not like it. I do highly recommend a pistolgrip buttstock with a good recoil pad. Choate has some nice options Mark 6, the ATI stocks work great ATI, and the SpeedFeed IV Tactical is a beaut SpeedFeed.

2guntom
454 Casull +
AntiAmerican
Destruction
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 2:39:33 PM EDT
I myself went with an 870 Police Magnum. I have absolutely no regrets, and wouldn't hesitate to buy one again if I needed another.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 3:17:00 PM EDT
You absolutely can't go wrong with an 870. You cannot beat it for strength and versatilty. I would go with one of the police versions with all of the bells and whistles already installed on it.

The Express versions are nice and inexpensive, but the magazine tubes need some modification to get the extensions to work, unless you get Express HD version with the factory two shot extension installed. The Express HD version comes with the synthetic stocks too, but the forearm is the standard length and will interfere with a side saddle shell holder, so you would have to swap that out for a shorter one that comes standard on the police model.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 3:25:14 PM EDT
If I wanted to customize an 870, To start with I would a well used Remington 870 Wing Master as the wing master is a much smoother, better made grade than the Express. I would also go with a 22" barrel so you mag tube extension will allow you to have an 8 round capacity (personal preference I want at least 8 rounds in the Gun) and then I would go from there the adjustable stock aspect of the Ar type stocks appeals to me but I dont especially care for a lower pistol grip on a shotgun I find it gets in the way of my loading. Try looking at and handling some 870's in different configurations at the next gun show and see what you like. I ran an 870 Express 28" barrell with a 10 shot mag tube (11 shots total in the gun) for 3 gun for a couple years wasnt a bad set up but a little long and of course it wasnt as nice as the Wing Master I had hunting birds when I was growing up.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 4:28:41 PM EDT
I recommend getting an 870 Police Magnum, and a basic one at that. You can then use the difference between the purchase price of the 870P and other more expensive guns by purchasing the accessories you want. The end result will be a tough-as-nails, highly reliable shotgun with everything (and only what) you want on it.

Some things I have learned to pass along for you to use as you see fit:

1) Stay away from magazine tube extensions. They get jammed, and if you need more than 5 rounds to make your point, then it is a moot point, 'cause you are dead. Better to have a gun that has five rounds in the mag, and can fire all five, than one that holds eight and fires one. If you really think you need one for the 870P you buy, then let me know. I've got a practically new Remington LE unit in the box that I took off my gun for the reason above.

2) Make sure you really need those ghost ring sights before you spend a lot of money on them. My bet is I can get rounds on target just as accurately, and quicker than, guys with rifle sights within 50 yards with my plain ol' tritium bead. And if you need to engage past 50 yards, switch over to your AR. Takeaway point: A shotgun is a short-range weapon designed to be quickly brought to bear against close or moving targets. Don't ruin that functionality with useless gadgets that do nothing but look cool.

3) Take the money you would spend on a fancy lookin' pistol gripped stock, and instead spend it having a high-quality recoil pad like a Sims or a Pachmayr installed on a standard stock (I recommend the 870P walnut stock with a Pachmayr Decelerator). They shoulder quicker and swing much better than a pistol gripped unit. Plus, I think a satin finished walnut stock looks really good on a Parkerized weapon. You've already got plenty of black plastic on your AR. Go with something different on your new shotgun. Afterall, variety is the spice of life (and your gun collection).

4) Burnt gunpowder and CLP smell great. Take the opportunity to smell both often.
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 4:29:46 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 4:31:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ikor:
ANY 12ga. short barreled shotgun that works reliably, is loaded with Buckshot and is in the "right" hands is a bad azz gun for HD use.

No secret here that I am an 870 kinda guy, but I will echo 2guntom and say try several different models out and ask some questions, etc. Unlike him, I do not at all care for pistol-gripped stocks on my shotguns...see?...everyone feels differently about different issues, and you, my friend, need some experience before you can really "know" just what you like, don't like, or prefer.

I would recommend a standard, 18in. barreled gun to start, and buy AMMO rather than accessories which you may or may not even want later. SHOOT your shotgun and learn what it will and won't do before you begin to modify it. An experienced shotgunner with a standard shotgun is 1000 times more dangerous than the guy with the bad azz rig who has no idea what to do or how to get it done.




true enough
Link Posted: 12/29/2005 6:06:24 PM EDT
I recently picked up a 870 Special Purpose for $300. It has a 18" barrel with rifle sights and a longer vent rib barrel. I plan to use a Speedfeed IV-S on it. I may add a Surefire forend also.
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 1:25:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By shotar:
The 870 is a better gun than either of the other choices mentioned. In fact it is without doubt the best pump shotgun ever made.




Agreed 100%...



"3) Take the money you would spend on a fancy lookin' pistol gripped stock, and instead spend it having a high-quality recoil pad like a Sims or a Pachmayr installed on a standard stock (I recommend the 870P walnut stock with a Pachmayr Decelerator). They shoulder quicker and swing much better than a pistol gripped unit. Plus, I think a satin finished walnut stock looks really good on a Parkerized weapon. You've already got plenty of black plastic on your AR. Go with something different on your new shotgun. Afterall, variety is the spice of life (and your gun collection)."



Also agreed 100%....

- georgestrings
Link Posted: 12/31/2005 11:46:50 AM EDT
I've done a lot of experimentation with my 870 Express. It started life with a 28" barrel and wood stocks. I bought it used for $175. I've spent quite a bit of money on various accesories.

The key is to shoot, shoot often, and with various types of ammo. Mine has been shot so much in the 10 years I've owned it that it has the slickest, smoothest action of any shotgun I've handled. No gunsmith trigger/action job, simply natural smoothing with use.

Through my experimentation, trial and error, I have found that a pistolgripped buttstock is a must for me. Everybody is different, and what works for one doesn't always work for all. A quality recoil pad is a must.

I have chronicled some of my experimentation, good and bad, at my website
www.2guntom.com/shotguns/remington870.html
www.2guntom.com/shotguns/remington8702.html
www.2guntom.com/shotguns/remington8703.html
www.2guntom.com/shotguns/remington8704.html
www.2guntom.com/shotguns/remington8705.html

Also worth mentioning
www.2guntom.com/shotguns/winchester3.html
www.2guntom.com/shotguns/winchester4.html
www.2guntom.com/shotguns/winchester5.html

I don't have the Winchester Defender anymore. Currently, the Remington 870 has an ATI pistolgrip buttstock; this stock provides maximum control and provides 2 points of recoil absorbtion. There is an ATI 5 round shell holder attached to the stock, and an SVL LimbSaver recoil pad. The 18" barrel was replaced with a 20" Remington brand barrel with rifle sights and screw in choke tubes. The side saddle was removed because it added unnecessary weight in the wrong location that threw off the balance of the gun, for me. The 2+ mag extension is still on the gun, but it may not last. I may just put a Remington brand mag cap on it that already has the sling swivel installed. The other option would be a Scattergun Tech 1+ mag extension; those give that little extra length to get one more shell plus a sling swivel stud, but I am still searching for a retailer that has a good price on them. The forend is a standard or long length SpeedFeed. There is also a Dorcy Heavy Metal luxeon LED light attached to the barrel via an ATI barrel clamp.

I had made mention of my dislike for the Remington's weight on my website. That has changed. I take back anything I ever said bad about my 870; I was wrong! Yes, it weighs well over 10 pounds fully loaded, but when shooting hot 3" magnums, or any type of slug, weight is a good thing. (For a bedside hd gun, add the side saddle back on and the longest mag extension you can find.) For me, things that go bump in the night mean a lot of walking to check on animals and livestock; for me home defense = farm defense. Yes, the gun is heavy, but it gives me the edge to come out on top of any situation I might encounter so I have quit griping.

The new barrel was quite impressive when I got it. It has a parkerized-style dull finish. The sights are accented in white in the right spots. The forcing cone was surprisingly long, but not polished. It has since been honed. The bore was immaculately polished at the factory and has since been burnished to retain this. I have tested it with the Rifled, IC, and Modified choke tubes. The Rifled tube closes the groups with Remington foster-style slugs so I can run 2 slugs almost through the same hole at 25 yards. The Modified tube gives tight patterns with 3" #4 and #1 buckshot. I may be engaging 4 legged moving targets at distances over 50 yards so that is splendid. I'm looking forward to trying the Full choke and doing some intense pattern testing. If it is as successful as I hope, I may have finally concocted the perfect, all-round, one-size-fits-all, multipurpose shotgun. That is the gun that takes squirrel, rabbit, and deer (food), kills oppossum, raccoon, ferral dog, ferral hog, mountain lion, and bear, and (HEAVEN FORBID!) the 2 legged predators. All of this accomplished by a change in choke tube and ammo.

My definition of home defense encompasses a broader spectrum than most. My expectations are probably much higher than most too. I share this information in hopes that you will be able to extract some tidbits that will be useful for your application.

One of the best things I have ever done is admire someone else's gun at a shooting range. Most gun owners are flattered and offer to let me try it. This alone has allowed me try many guns before a purchase. In the long run, it has probably saved me thousands of dollars of regret because a lot of these guns weren't what I thought they were.

Whatever you decide to buy, shoot it, shoot it a lot, and shoot it often. When you change anything on or about the gun, shoot it and shoot it a lot.

2guntom
2guntom.com
454 Casull +
AntiAmerican
Destruction
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