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Posted: 1/28/2006 9:15:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2006 9:17:28 AM EDT by Badrat414]
I just tried out my first 1911 (new). At approx. 10 yards using PMC ammo, I couldn't hit a 6" circle I was ALL over the place. I mean a foot sometimes. I got 0 outta 14 shots. With my Ruger P90 I could have hit it. Is there realy that much differance in the sights? Maybe I just need a couple drinks first!!
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 12:14:07 PM EDT
I would move the target in closer until you start getting good groupings then move it out. There's no reason to be shooting at 10 feet if you can't hit anything at half that.
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 12:23:15 PM EDT
What brand 1911? Was it shooting low? Is it a Springfield? Springfield seems to let guns out of the factory that shoot way to low beyond 10 feet. I've got a new milspec that is 8" low at 10 yards and right on the money at 10 feet.

Try what Trig mentioned above. Start close, see where it hits and gradually move the target out. I would think you could shoot a 1911 much better than that Ruger.
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 1:23:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2006 1:24:29 PM EDT by DocGun]
Good first step: If you are shooting at a range, get one of the range masters to try your gun.
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 1:30:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2006 1:35:25 PM EDT by Badrat414]
It's a Springfield 1911 A1. I was about 10 YARDs out and hitting very low around 1 -1/2 FEET low. I'm used to the three white dots my Ruger has. Can the front sights be changed. I don't like the small front sight. I have to get used to the lighter trigger pull put it can't be all me!
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 1:45:19 PM EDT
i can shoot better with my Ruger also. But after 50-60 rounds with the 1911 i was getting better. I think it just takes practice. The 1911 trigger is a lot different than the Ruger and i noticed that i had to adjust my grip on the gun and the trigger.
K
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 1:48:50 PM EDT
If it really is the gun shooting VERY low (which it probably is) you can send it back to SA and have them fix it to shoot point of aim. They do have a lifetime warranty. Or, you could have a local smith change the sights to something more to your liking. It sounds like changing the sights might be the better of the two options.

That's my plan. I've got a new set of Heinie's in bound right now for my milspec.
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 2:41:04 PM EDT
If you don't have a consistant group you cannot assume the sights are off. At 10 yards you should have a 2 or 3 inch group, if you are using the same aiming reference. High or low makes no difference on that. Once you get a good consistant group, you can determine whether it is shooting to point of aim, or high/low. Don't try to play kentucky windage at this point, just use the same aim picture every time. Practice dry firing [UNLOAD UNLOAD UNLOAD!!!!!] and get used to the trigger and the break. I will bet some of it is jerking of the trigger, as that will produce a low, and to the left pattern.

Before you send it back, practice getting a good consistant group. Also, as the BBL and slide wear together, accuracy may increase quite a bit as they "fit". Run at least 300 rounds and preferably at least 500 before you send it back and let someone familiar with the 1911 design shoot it also. If they shoot it well, then you just need to learn your gun better.

Guns are like sex. The first few times you do it with a woman, you are learning about her and what makes her "tick", guns are really no different in THAT matter, and getting familiar with, and comfortable with shooting it will take a bit of time. Don't get stressed right away and just shoot a bit with it for fun and to get used to it.
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 2:47:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 3:07:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fxntime:
If you don't have a consistant group you cannot assume the sights are off. At 10 yards you should have a 2 or 3 inch group, if you are using the same aiming reference. High or low makes no difference on that. Once you get a good consistant group, you can determine whether it is shooting to point of aim, or high/low. Don't try to play kentucky windage at this point, just use the same aim picture every time. Practice dry firing [UNLOAD UNLOAD UNLOAD!!!!!] and get used to the trigger and the break. I will bet some of it is jerking of the trigger, as that will produce a low, and to the left pattern.

Before you send it back, practice getting a good consistant group. Also, as the BBL and slide wear together, accuracy may increase quite a bit as they "fit". Run at least 300 rounds and preferably at least 500 before you send it back and let someone familiar with the 1911 design shoot it also. If they shoot it well, then you just need to learn your gun better.

Guns are like sex. The first few times you do it with a woman, you are learning about her and what makes her "tick", guns are really no different in THAT matter, and getting familiar with, and comfortable with shooting it will take a bit of time. Don't get stressed right away and just shoot a bit with it for fun and to get used to it.



BIG +1
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 3:13:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2006 3:16:34 PM EDT by danpass]

Originally Posted By fxntime:
If you don't have a consistant group you cannot assume the sights are off. At 10 yards you should have a 2 or 3 inch group, if you are using the same aiming reference. High or low makes no difference on that. Once you get a good consistant group, you can determine whether it is shooting to point of aim, or high/low. Don't try to play kentucky windage at this point, just use the same aim picture every time. Practice dry firing [UNLOAD UNLOAD UNLOAD!!!!!] and get used to the trigger and the break. I will bet some of it is jerking of the trigger, as that will produce a low, and to the left pattern.

Before you send it back, practice getting a good consistant group. Also, as the BBL and slide wear together, accuracy may increase quite a bit as they "fit". Run at least 300 rounds and preferably at least 500 before you send it back and let someone familiar with the 1911 design shoot it also. If they shoot it well, then you just need to learn your gun better.

Guns are like sex. The first few times you do it with a woman, you are learning about her and what makes her "tick", guns are really no different in THAT matter, and getting familiar with, and comfortable with shooting it will take a bit of time. Don't get stressed right away and just shoot a bit with it for fun and to get used to it.




Originally Posted By SGB:
listen to fxntime, that's some good advise



+1

I was all over the place, dry fire right there at the range helped.

Another thing I did (at the range) was to load up, round chambered, put the safety ON and just practice squeezing the trigger. My muzzle flinched all over the place for the first two or three pulls and then settled down. Then I fired off some rounds, safety back on and keep practicing that routine to program my muscles.

At 7yds I am shooting eight rounds into a 4in diameter group and at 15yds about a 8in group (still working on that part )


Something I learned while learning guitar is this:

Smoothness leads to Accuracy which then leads to Speed. Take your time with your shots, simply popping off rounds wasn't helping me until I got real deliberate with my grip and my trigger finger. Lately I have been shooting half the rounds but getting twice the improvement .
Link Posted: 1/28/2006 3:38:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fxntime:
If you don't have a consistant group you cannot assume the sights are off. At 10 yards you should have a 2 or 3 inch group, if you are using the same aiming reference. High or low makes no difference on that. Once you get a good consistant group, you can determine whether it is shooting to point of aim, or high/low. Don't try to play kentucky windage at this point, just use the same aim picture every time. Practice dry firing [UNLOAD UNLOAD UNLOAD!!!!!] and get used to the trigger and the break. I will bet some of it is jerking of the trigger, as that will produce a low, and to the left pattern.

Before you send it back, practice getting a good consistant group. Also, as the BBL and slide wear together, accuracy may increase quite a bit as they "fit". Run at least 300 rounds and preferably at least 500 before you send it back and let someone familiar with the 1911 design shoot it also. If they shoot it well, then you just need to learn your gun better.

Guns are like sex. The first few times you do it with a woman, you are learning about her and what makes her "tick", guns are really no different in THAT matter, and getting familiar with, and comfortable with shooting it will take a bit of time. Don't get stressed right away and just shoot a bit with it for fun and to get used to it.



+Another!
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 4:32:02 PM EDT
Hey badrat, have you gone out and done a bit more shooting with it yet? If so, what was happening?
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 4:40:46 PM EDT
Concentrate on the front sight blade.
Concentrate on slowly squeeezing the trigger.
Don't anticipate the recoil.
Don't hold the grip so hard your hand shakes.
Use quality ammo.
Don't run with scissors or go swimming too soon after a meal.

Practice,practice,practice.

Poor sights and heavy triggers can be fixed and will make the project more to your liking and probably more accurate in your hands.

Oh yeah, practice some more and please step away away from the keyboard!
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 6:39:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fxntime:
Hey badrat, have you gone out and done a bit more shooting with it yet? If so, what was happening?


I haven't been to the range yet. I really don't want to go because it's "Davis" in Raleigh NC. If anyone is familiar with them you know why I don't want to go there, plus it's 20 miles one way. I have been practising dry firing it. I'll let ya know.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 6:27:36 AM EDT
good morning.

my youngest boy has a problem with slapping the trigger and jerking/flinching or whatever.

what i have done with him is have him practice dry firing with a dime balanced on top of the slide just behind the front sight. the object is to sight at something, pull the trigger, and still have the dime setting on the slide after he pulls the trigger. this has helped him a lot.

try it. it will make you a better shot.

oh. +1 to everything else said above too.

good luck.

peace.
billr
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 10:25:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 10:44:29 PM EDT by Parabellium]
I have 2 springers one shot pretty good (loaded model) and my Mil-spec GI would kinda be all over the place, for the longest time i thought it was me then one day i decide to try a EGW ez fit bushing. WOW what a diffrence! next my loaded is getting one. I wish SA would just send their 1911's out with a tighter bushing.

ETA: The other day a guy at the range was haveing problems getting a good group with his springer Mil-spec so i asked if he wanted me to try it out, He said ok and sure enough was doing the same thing my GI was, so i asked him if he would like to try my 1911 out to make sure it was not him. guy just handed it back saying wow, that thing is accurate! I wrote the bushing info on a piece of paper for him and instructions on what i had to do to fit it.
I highly reccomend changeing out your bushing
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 3:20:39 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 2:30:07 PM EDT
That makes two of us who cant hit shit. I got a very experienced shooter to go shooting with me and point out what i was doing wrong.

SQUEEEEZE the trigger gently. dont pull or yank, but squeeze it. As my dad said, try to do it by connecting the tip of your trigger finger to the base of that same finger. Sounds funky, but it seems a smoother action.

Use your thumb on your other hand to help support the trigger pull, making equal forces on either side of the gun helps to keep the pistol where u want it.

Line up your sights.

Use the correct breathing cycles.


Although this is embarassing When i first shot a 1911, when i was around 12, i was scared of it. It was the loudest hardest kicking thing i ever had fired to date. Because of this pansy fear of mine, i was blinking, not keeping my eye on target, and i would flinch causing my rounds to hit low and left. After time, more firinig experience, and growing some balls, i got over this. Im not saying your scared of it, just maybe not accustomed to it.


PJ
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 7:45:16 PM EDT
You might have a trigger actuator problem...
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 1:04:18 AM EDT
I have this same problem... i'm goina be getting in some range time here soon so i'll try out some of the sugestions on this thread..

i'm just worryed that its not me its the pistola its a early 1911 Colt USGI slide and if its the sights i dont want to hack into that slide to fit new sights to it..

Jess
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 4:38:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Darkstar117:
You might have a trigger actuator problem...



and/or a loose front sight
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 11:46:47 AM EDT
Practise, practise, practise. I have a milspec 1911A1 and when I first got it I could not hit the broad side of a barn. I finally got smart and put a target at 5 yds and 10 yds. I went from a huge 8-10" spread down to a 2" group after a couple of weekends, the more I shoot the better I get.
I am gradually setting targets out 15 and 25 yards it has made a big difference. I am more confident i spend less time aiming and more time putting lead where I want it in nice tight groups.
JMHO YMMV
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