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Posted: 12/8/2003 2:31:53 PM EDT
I'm a LEO and I just broke my right hand, which is now in a cast for 6 weeks. Now,I'm working a desk until I can qualify in a timed, stress fire course with my weak hand, or until my right hand heals. Anyone have tips for a crash course in weak hand, unsupported, firing??
Link Posted: 12/8/2003 2:40:53 PM EDT
dry fire until your hand is numb and you cant hardly hold your arm up.. and then dry fire some more

this is of course when you are not at the range or sleeping

only thing I can think of that could provide quick results

... and have fun racking the slide after each trigger pull with a broken hand
Link Posted: 12/8/2003 3:35:42 PM EDT
I used to do dry fire exercises with a Smith & Wesson 686 by balancing a dime behind the front sight. However, it doesn't seem like much of a challenge with a Glock because of the flat slide.
Link Posted: 12/8/2003 6:01:32 PM EDT
the idea is to develope muscle memory

the idea with the coin on top is just to learn the trigger pull.. and as you said wouldnt be too hard with a glock slide

practice unholstering the gun, bringing the sights up and firing

the hard part about weak hand is to get in a rythm of bringing the sights up the same way

trigger pull will also be something to be "re-mastered" when using weak arm

the main idea is for all the actions that you would need to use if you had to draw your weapon to become natural.. to where you do not have to think, "im using my left hand so i'll have to grip the pistol this way and bring the sights up using this eye/both eyes"

dry firing is good to learn trigger control but is also great for becoming familar with the motions.. and in this case with your left hand.. making it slightly harder.

whenever not eating/sleeping you should have your gun out dry firing and practicing bringing up the sights to the same place every time.. naturally.. without thought
Link Posted: 12/9/2003 10:29:24 PM EDT
When shooting with your weak hand, don't forget to continue to use your dominant eye. Also cant the pistol, about 45 degrees to the right, to help with the recoil. To rack the slide with one hand,
1) finger off the trigger
2) muzzle pointed down
3) hook the rear sight on your belt
4) push down

Hope this helps!
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 5:28:37 PM EDT
Personally, when shooting week handed I do something I do not do when shooting two handed... I stick my arm straight out and lock the elbow...this works for me, Ditto on the above comment on canting the gun to your right, this helps... dont go overboard and go "gangsta" on us...but a bit of cant of the gun is ok. Practice that draw as it is the most awkward part of the event. As far as shooting, if you have a plate rack wear it out.

Personally, I think your nuts to go on the street with a broken stong hand, but thats just MHO.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 12/12/2003 7:49:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ChrisG19:
When shooting with your weak hand, don't forget to continue to use your dominant eye. Also cant the pistol, about 45 degrees to the right, to help with the recoil. To rack the slide with one hand,
1) finger off the trigger
2) muzzle pointed down
3) hook the rear sight on your belt
4) push down

Hope this helps!



It's somewhat safer to kneel down and hook the front sight on the back of the heel of your shoe.
It's also possible to hold the fore part of the slide (front cocking serrations help here) and rack the slide back bracing the back of the grip against your thigh. Keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction!
Link Posted: 12/12/2003 6:57:15 PM EDT
Nine weeks ago I injured my right (dominant) hand, and was in a splint for 6 weeks as well. I carry a 1911 in an IWB, and here is what worked for me.
1. Installed ambi-safety.
2. Bought a left-handed holster.
3. Began with a lot of dry-firing before going to the range.
4. First 20 live-fire rounds were terrible, as trigger control was poor
5. After a few hundred rounds accuracy and speed were adequate, but far inferior to previous dominant hand shooting.
6. Lock left arm and rotate gun 45 degrees clockwise (as described above).
7. I used the back of my heal to cycle the slide, as recommended above. It obviously requires you drop down to the floor, but this has some positive features, depending upon the situation.
8. Most of all, don’t give up, and practice.

GOOD LUCK!
Link Posted: 12/14/2003 11:38:16 AM EDT
Stand with weak sholder toward target, feet shoulder width, 90 degrees away from target, Cross strong arm across chest (with hand basically over your heart in a fist, if a righty) cant pistol about 45 degrees and use either eye that is most comfortable. I use weak eye.

This method has served me very well with 1911s, Glocks and revolvers in many years of IPSC and IDPA.

Good luck!
Link Posted: 12/17/2003 12:29:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HiCapMag:

Personally, I think your nuts to go on the street with a broken stong hand, but thats just MHO.

Good luck.



Mine too. The one dirtbag who had the gaul to think about rushing/resisting might just take your disability into mind and decide to risk your life and his. =
However, I am strongly for learning how to shoot weak handed regardless of your choice.

Aim small, miss small.
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