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Posted: 5/12/2003 9:16:32 AM EDT
I have decided to get one. Which one?
Link Posted: 5/12/2003 10:53:48 PM EDT
Both? Kim Darby used a Walker in the movie "True Grit". A Navy will probably balance better, though.
Link Posted: 5/13/2003 6:18:38 PM EDT
Get the walker, thats a mans gun....
Link Posted: 5/13/2003 6:50:07 PM EDT
I vote also for the Walker. The history behind it is great.

It was also Josey Wale's weapon of choice.

Don't even get started with that "fictional character" nonsense. That movie was a documentary!

It is, indeed, a "man's" gun. Not a gun for some sissy, limp wristed squid .
Link Posted: 5/13/2003 6:56:33 PM EDT
Incidentally, here is a pic of me and my Walker - this is the Avatar I use on another forum:

Link Posted: 5/13/2003 7:37:14 PM EDT
The Navy in .36 will probably handle a little better, but the Walker is like the .454 Casull of its day.
Link Posted: 5/15/2003 2:18:07 AM EDT
I have a Navy in .44, best of both worlds.
The Navy is a natural pointer and good shooter.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 2:45:18 AM EDT
Have you handled each yet? Which do you like? I like my Navy for a packing pistol.

De Oppresso Liber
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 2:52:57 AM EDT
I'm partial to the .36 Navy and it is the Good, Bad, and The Ugly gun. LOL

The feel is great. It's light but nose heavy so if you hold it up and lower, it's right on target. Nice shooter plus I like the engraving. Real gun powder is a hoot in a black powder pistol. The flame shoots out the barrel followed by a cloud of smoke. I've had people move over two benches at the range. Freaks them out.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 2:55:48 AM EDT
I can't believe nobody has said it yet...



BUY BOTH!
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 12:27:17 PM EDT
So you missed that"for use with blackpowder only" stamped on the barrel?

I'd move several benches over, too, if some moron started shooting smokeless powder out of a blackpowder firearm.

As to the question at hand, the Walker would be my choice of the two listed. Personally, I am partial to the Remington in .44.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 12:36:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By flinterfan:
So you missed that"for use with blackpowder only" stamped on the barrel?

I'd move several benches over, too, if some moron started shooting smokeless powder out of a blackpowder firearm.

As to the question at hand, the Walker would be my choice of the two listed. Personally, I am partial to the Remington in .44.




The flame shoots out the barrel followed by a cloud of smoke.


Note the above line from my post! Gun Powder is Black Powder not Pyrodex or smokeless gun powder. It's what was used for centuries up to and including WWII. Carbon, Sulpher, potassium nitrate. Modern gun propellents are typically referred to as "Smokeless Gun Powder".
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 1:17:41 PM EDT

So you missed that"for use with blackpowder only" stamped on the barrel?

So you've never handled a cap & ball revolver? Quite an experience and one you shouldn't criticize because you don't understand it.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 2:48:17 PM EDT
I think flinterfan misunderstood. Tom Jeff was talking about black powder, not smokeless I'm pretty sure 'bout that. I think the navy would suit you better if this is your first. Those horse pistols are a bit heavy and cumbersome. Whatever you get grease those chambers good for a nice boom and forget about any wads.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 3:37:55 PM EDT

Those horse pistols are a bit heavy and cumbersome.

They're ALL heavy and "cumbersome."


Whatever you get grease those chambers good for a nice boom and forget about any wads.

WRONG. Wads are just about a necessity for good accuracy. More misinformation from you.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 4:01:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/16/2003 4:03:09 PM EDT by M199]

Originally Posted By Jim_Dandy:

Those horse pistols are a bit heavy and cumbersome.

They're ALL heavy and "cumbersome."


Whatever you get grease those chambers good for a nice boom and forget about any wads.

WRONG. Wads are just about a necessity for good accuracy. More misinformation from you.



Jim, you have some real problems. A Navy comes in at LESS than 2.5 pounds and a Walker weighs in the neighborhood of almost 5 pounds! Twice the weight!!!!!!A Navy is VERY well balanced and handles nicely. Who's the one who doesn't KNOW what they post? Wads DONN'T seal as WELL as grease, of course ANYBODY with experience would know this. Also keeps fouling MUCH softer. I suggest you practice more time on REAL life than cyber. Sorry to everyone about the side comments but this guy has some MAJOR problems.
Edit to say this is my last comment on this post as Jim will reposnd with more blabber.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 4:22:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/16/2003 4:34:10 PM EDT by Jim_Dandy]

A Navy comes in at LESS than 2.5 pounds and a Walker weighs in the neighborhood of almost 5 pounds! Twice the weight!!!!!!A Navy is VERY well balanced and handles nicely. Who's the one who doesn't KNOW what they post?

I'd say you're the one who doesn't know what he's posting if you think an 1851 Navy, which weighs in at over THREE pounds when it's loaded, is light and handy. Jesus Christ, get things into perspective. ALL cap & ball sixguns are HEAVY.



Wads DONN'T seal as WELL as grease, of course ANYBODY with experience would know this.

In which case it would be YOU who doesn't have the experience in this arena, my man. It's damned near impossible to get GOOD (do you even know what "GOOD" means?) consistent accuracy (you wouldn't understand that, I'm sure) without a filler of some kind. Make your filler a piece of felt soaked in wax or fat and you've killed two birds with one stone. Minimal fouling, to boot. Of course you wouldn't know that either since you're just some anonymous hack on the 'net who happens to be the bullshitter du jour.


Edit to say this is my last comment on this post as Jim will reposnd with more blabber.

If you're right, then stick to it. This only means you're full of shit and probably don't own any cap & ball sixguns, let alone having ever shot one. DON'T GIVE ADVICE YOU'RE NOT WILLING TO TAKE.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 5:06:18 PM EDT
I dont know about the wads, but I always just used Crisco on mine and never had any trouble. The pistol was plenty accurate for what it is. Its not a target pistol. My Navy isnt heavy or cumbersome. It is a well balanced pistol that does point well. Its certainly a lot lighter and handier than a Walker. The Navy weighs about 2-3/4 pounds the Walker about 4-1/2. Reguardless, they are both a lot of fun to shoot.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 5:25:16 PM EDT

The Navy weighs about 2-3/4 pounds

In other words, OVER THREE POUNDS LOADED. As in, NOT LIGHT. Lighter than a Walker, but NOT light.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 5:47:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/16/2003 5:55:37 PM EDT by TomJefferson]

Originally Posted By AK103K:
I dont know about the wads, but I always just used Crisco on mine and never had any trouble. The pistol was plenty accurate for what it is. Its not a target pistol. My Navy isnt heavy or cumbersome. It is a well balanced pistol that does point well. Its certainly a lot lighter and handier than a Walker. The Navy weighs about 2-3/4 pounds the Walker about 4-1/2. Reguardless, they are both a lot of fun to shoot.



Thought I would mention and a bit taken that Jim didn't jump on this but I use to use the Crisco cause the pioneers used bear greese until............One nice really hot summer day after firing off two three full loads, I cooked off all of them at once, hell of a head rush. I use wads only now. SHTF, I would use an old "T" shirt but no Crisco.

May not be as big an issue in PA and that did happen to me in TX on a 100 degree day.

BTW: Don't let Jim get to you. He just likes a good fight but knows his black powder and has alot of info to pass on.

Oh yea, don't bother to slam me Jim for I've made up my mind I like you whether you like it or not.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 5:54:30 PM EDT

Thought I would mention and a bit taken that Jim didn't jump on this but I use to use the Crisco cause the pioneers used bear greese until............One nice really hot summer day after firing off two three full loads, I cooked off all of them at once, hell of a head rush. I use wads only now. SHTF, I would use an old "T" shirt but no Crisco.

That's the big problem I've had with greases, Crisco, etc. Melting off prematurely. The wads eliminate that and make a nice filler, too. Pretty handy stuff.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 6:12:00 PM EDT
Tom,
It gets pretty warm here in the summer, but I never had any trouble with the crisco other than it gets messy. I've heard and read about them doing it, but I never had a cylinder flash off. I personally dont know anyone who has. I've talked to other boys who load a little bigger ball and no grease and claim they never had a problem either, I dont know, I never tried it. I'll have to get some wads and give them a try the next time I get it out. When I got mine back in the 70's, I shot the hell out of it, now days I shoot it once in awhile for something different. It is nice to shoot for a couple of hours and not blow off half a case.

Jim,
I agree its not light, but it is a lot lighter than the Walker.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 6:20:10 PM EDT

Oh yea, don't bother to slam me Jim for I've made up my mind I like you whether you like it or not.

As long as that likin' doesn't lead to something else!!!
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 6:24:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AK103K:
Tom,
It gets pretty warm here in the summer, but I never had any trouble with the crisco other than it gets messy. I've heard and read about them doing it, but I never had a cylinder flash off. I personally dont know anyone who has. I've talked to other boys who load a little bigger ball and no grease and claim they never had a problem either, I dont know, I never tried it. I'll have to get some wads and give them a try the next time I get it out. When I got mine back in the 70's, I shot the hell out of it, now days I shoot it once in awhile for something different. It is nice to shoot for a couple of hours and not blow off half a case.

Jim,
I agree its not light, but it is a lot lighter than the Walker.



You do now my man, me! LOL

You ever notice the notch right in front of the cylnder that is about to turn. It's there for a reason which is to divert that round if it cooks off. It will shoot off to the right at a sharp angle instead of blowing the handgun and your hand to pieces. Like I said, hell of a head rush, excellent recoil and big bang, and after your heart stops pounding you feel kind of lucky.
Link Posted: 5/16/2003 8:42:40 PM EDT
One thing that hasn't really been pointed out as of yet is the comparison. How in the hell do you compare a Walker with an 1851 Navy? They're not even the same class of handgun. The Walker is, quite literally, the magnum-class handgun of its day. This is like comparing a GP100 Ruger to a Super Redhawk, or a S&W 686 to a 629.
Link Posted: 5/17/2003 6:47:24 AM EDT
Its that damn weight and size issue again. The Navy(Confederate model in .44, I know a true navy is in .36) isnt a weakling by any means. I know its not the "mag" the Walker can be, but its a lot more user friendly size wise, especially if you have to carry a pair on your belt. I dont think the 686 and 629 are a good comparision as they really are not that different in size and weight. Power is a different story.
Link Posted: 5/17/2003 11:13:03 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/19/2003 5:01:00 AM EDT by AR_Rifle]
Thank you gentlemen for your kind support. I have purchased the Navy (Modern). The seller is a nice guy. I have checked the gun and it is unfired and the cylinder is unturned. Brand new, complete with original box and paper works. He also throw in a wood presentation box with a brass U.S Cavalry cross sabres. Nice.

Someone mentioned "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly", and yes it was one of the reasons I bought it. I love that gun, the movie and Mr. Eastwood.



Edit to add pic.
Link Posted: 5/17/2003 1:43:06 PM EDT
Sounds like a beut! Congrats! Don't be too impressed with it. Go out and shoot the gun, it's one of finest shooters ever built.
Link Posted: 5/17/2003 3:50:38 PM EDT
Tom Jefferson,
And I went back and re-read your original post, and admit I misunderstood it.

Blackpowder is a hoot to shoot and don't forget besides the noise and the flash you get that rotten egg smell. Of course to me it smells like perfume.

I've never cooked off a cylinder. When we shoot b.p. revolver we've never used wads or grease. The thought was when you seat the bullet you shave off lead and that seals the chamber.

We did make sure all the nipples had caps, as we have always thought the way a crossfire or chainfire was more likely to happend from the backend, not the front.

I'd be interested in anyone's thoughts.

Link Posted: 5/17/2003 3:55:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/17/2003 4:59:49 PM EDT by Jim_Dandy]

I've never cooked off a cylinder. When we shoot b.p. revolver we've never used wads or grease. The thought was when you seat the bullet you shave off lead and that seals the chamber.

What if your chamber isn't perfectly concentric? You haven't had a ring fire.....YET. The more you shoot things the way you're shooting, the better your chances of ring firing. Start using wads, grease, etc.
Link Posted: 5/17/2003 4:46:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By flinterfan:
Tom Jefferson,
And I went back and re-read your original post, and admit I misunderstood it.

Blackpowder is a hoot to shoot and don't forget besides the noise and the flash you get that rotten egg smell. Of course to me it smells like perfume.

I've never cooked off a cylinder. When we shoot b.p. revolver we've never used wads or grease. The thought was when you seat the bullet you shave off lead and that seals the chamber.

We did make sure all the nipples had caps, as we have always thought the way a crossfire or chainfire was more likely to happend from the backend, not the front.

I'd be interested in anyone's thoughts.




Funny, I have gotten so use to the smell, I forgot just how bad it does smell. Nothing like sulpher burning in the morning. It smells like victory!

I do have to agree with Jim, without a wad preferably presoaked in greese/wax, it's not a matter of if you get a cook off, it is when. Lead is very soft as metals go and all it takes is a hot realy hot gun and a little path through the lead.

What I have found is that the more you shoot the revolver the more the set pen will move which causes the gap to increase between the barrel and cylnder. So it follows the more you fire, the bigger the gap, the more spark around the cylnder with each shot. I tend to check the gap regularly just in case.

Could be I just wore the crap out of my guns. LOL
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 2:43:22 PM EDT
The 1851 Navy is a great looking and beautifully balanced pistol, rivaled only by the 1860 Army.
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 3:52:15 PM EDT
Jim Dandy & Tom Jeff,
OK, I can see the logic behind what you are saying. But one question remains:

If I use Crisco will my guns smell like fried chicken?

Thanks for the info and help, guys. I'll refrain from wadding any puns in here...oops too late.
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 5:29:02 PM EDT

If I use Crisco will my guns smell like fried chicken?

It whets the appetite.



The 1851 Navy is a great looking and beautifully balanced pistol, rivaled only by the 1860 Army.

You're forgetting the 1861 Navy. All of the best features of the 1851 Navy and 1860 Army combined.
Link Posted: 5/18/2003 6:00:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By flinterfan:
Jim Dandy & Tom Jeff,
OK, I can see the logic behind what you are saying. But one question remains:

If I use Crisco will my guns smell like fried chicken?

Thanks for the info and help, guys. I'll refrain from wadding any puns in here...oops too late.



I cheat, I buy the wads already soaked in Wonder Lube.
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