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Posted: 2/24/2006 5:04:53 AM EDT
I've been pretty much exclusively shooting a Glock 19 over the past few months and have over 3000 rounds of 9mm and 1100 rounds of .22LR (Advantage Arms conversion) down range at this point. The primary purpose of the .22 conversion is to put finding the trigger reset into muscle memory.

I can see the utility of the trigger reset point to a degree. It allows for very smooth follow up shots with nearly no trigger travel. When target shooting I can more easily punch out the center of the target if I stage at the reset.

But how practical is it? Beyond the need for a fast followup shot I'm not going to keep the trigger at the reset in a serious situation - the chance of an ND would be astronomical while moving or communicating.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 5:12:36 AM EDT
You are correct "catching the link" is only for when you intended to take another shot. Moving your trigger finger is off the trigger along side of the weapon.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 5:20:14 AM EDT
I practice first shots with follow up shots being from the reset. If I ever have to use it in self defense, I don't plan on shooting just once.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 5:22:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ONG:
You are correct "catching the link" is only for when you intended to take another shot. Moving your trigger finger is off the trigger along side of the weapon.



Absolutely!

I've now have an XD-45 that I am really enjoying. It's reset point is further out than the Glock but this seems to be a non-issue as it takes longer to recover from recoil with it than with a 9mm so followup shots aren't going to be as fast anyhow.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 5:02:04 PM EDT
I always caught the link as just part of my follow through. The front sight needs to come back too. Then after firing finger comes off the trigger and trigger finger goes on index point on the frame, and then if possible, scan and asses.

The way you operate your pistol should be the same for the most part when shooting on the move. The way you follow through should definitely be the same. Do you really think that you are suddenly going to be able to shoot in a completely different manner than how you trained in a "serious situation" as you called it? If you are not on target and actively engaging you should have your finger on the index point and out of the trigger guard. When actively shooting on the move there is nothing wrong with using proper shooting technique.

What does your finger usually do after you have fired a shot?
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