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Posted: 1/17/2006 12:13:02 PM EDT
I've been looking at different pistols and trying to decide if paying a little more to get stainless is worth it.

I know I prefer the LOOKS of stainless, but aside from that and corrosion resistance, what else is the advantage?

Is stainless harder than carbon steel?

I really should use logic and get the carbon steel if my only reason for getting the stainless is for the looks. Help me with my decision.

This came about since the coming of the CZ75 in stainless. It sure looks purty.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 12:17:04 PM EDT
The finish on a stainless is usually a bit more durable. But, with the world of after market refinishing - to be honest - it's really just aestetics. Get whatever you like the most - some people like shiney guns, and others insist that they be black.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:50:25 PM EDT
Generally, stainless alloys used in firearms are softer than carbon steels. Charles.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 1:59:53 PM EDT
Thanks a lot fellas. No stainless for me.

I live in Houston, not going to be carrying the pistol in any harsh environment. I guess I can sacrifice aesthetics to save some money. Heck, I think the blued one will look better with time as it "ages" anyway. Wear on the finish should give it character.

Thanks again.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 2:07:17 PM EDT
I like stainless myself, but they say blued or matt guns work better
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 3:32:09 PM EDT
I refuse to buy anything but stainless anymore. Got sick of holster wear and rust after a day of carrying blued guns in warm weather. Damn things need constant care. But I'm also a tad prejudiced, as I prefer the look of stainless, and as I carry on duty, I want the bad guy looking into a dark hole surrounded by a shiny barrel, the contrast makes it look bigger. I have yet to do anything to prevent rust or corrosion on a stainless gun, but even in the midwest, blued guns need constant care. I'll gladly pay the extra for stainless. Besides, if you're in Texas you need a BBQ gun, and stainless looks great with a nice set of wood grips!

Just mine dos pesos.

Papajohn
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 4:36:30 PM EDT
Carbon steel is easier to work on if your going to go that route. Also, you can always reblue. If no custom work, it doesn't matter.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 4:54:45 PM EDT
Well, I just bought the blued one tonight. It's gone up in price since I first started looking at the cz75b. About a year and a half abo, it was $389. I just bought it for $406.

Thanks for all your help.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 11:15:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By papajohn:
I refuse to buy anything but stainless anymore. Got sick of holster wear and rust after a day of carrying blued guns in warm weather. Damn things need constant care. But I'm also a tad prejudiced, as I prefer the look of stainless, and as I carry on duty, I want the bad guy looking into a dark hole surrounded by a shiny barrel, the contrast makes it look bigger. I have yet to do anything to prevent rust or corrosion on a stainless gun, but even in the midwest, blued guns need constant care. I'll gladly pay the extra for stainless. Besides, if you're in Texas you need a BBQ gun, and stainless looks great with a nice set of wood grips!

Just mine dos pesos.

Papajohn



That's funny, because my blued guns have NEVER rusted. Ever.

Even when exposed to salt water.

Link Posted: 1/18/2006 11:16:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 1911builder:
Generally, stainless alloys used in firearms are softer than carbon steels. Charles.



Ding ding ding ding!!!

Good carbon steel guns hold up better to prolonged and heavy use. They may require slightly more maintenence, but only slightly more.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:57:02 PM EDT
While were on this topic...

I happened across a stainless frame last night at the gun shop. I have a carbon steel slide assembly sitting at home waiting on a new frame. I was tickled by the idea of putting the two together, but I'm not sure. I would think that galling due to dissimilar metals may be a concern, right? But at the same time, we're not talking about low quality junk steel. The slide and frame are both Springfield Armory, though the frame is marked Imbel, Brazil. I figure they know how to forge steel at Imbel by now.

So is this a project I can go forward with? Or should I wait and get a carbon steel frame?
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 2:01:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Subzero:
While were on this topic...

I happened across a stainless frame last night at the gun shop. I have a carbon steel slide assembly sitting at home waiting on a new frame. I was tickled by the idea of putting the two together, but I'm not sure. I would think that galling due to dissimilar metals may be a concern, right? But at the same time, we're not talking about low quality junk steel. The slide and frame are both Springfield Armory, though the frame is marked Imbel, Brazil. I figure they know how to forge steel at Imbel by now.

So is this a project I can go forward with? Or should I wait and get a carbon steel frame?

it'll work and shouldn't have any abnormal wear or anything like that. They do make factory 2-tone guns, so I couldn't see this being any different. And if it doesn't work....well.... I guess you'll just have to build 2 guns, and what a shame that would be
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 3:57:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Subzero:
While were on this topic...

I happened across a stainless frame last night at the gun shop. I have a carbon steel slide assembly sitting at home waiting on a new frame. I was tickled by the idea of putting the two together, but I'm not sure. I would think that galling due to dissimilar metals may be a concern, right?



Galling shouldn't be a concern. There are lots of stainless frames and carbon slides out there that work just fine.



But at the same time, we're not talking about low quality junk steel. The slide and frame are both Springfield Armory,



I wouldn't consider SA in the high quality department.




though the frame is marked Imbel, Brazil. I figure they know how to forge steel at Imbel by now.

So is this a project I can go forward with? Or should I wait and get a carbon steel frame?



You should be just fine.

Speaking personally I am only interested in all carbon steel 1911s from now on, but I happen to own a stainless framed 1911 and I am pretty sure it will survive longer than I will. My great grandkids will probably be shooting the weapon long after I am dead.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 10:58:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Subzero:
While were on this topic...

I happened across a stainless frame last night at the gun shop. I have a carbon steel slide assembly sitting at home waiting on a new frame. I was tickled by the idea of putting the two together, but I'm not sure. I would think that galling due to dissimilar metals may be a concern, right? But at the same time, we're not talking about low quality junk steel. The slide and frame are both Springfield Armory, though the frame is marked Imbel, Brazil. I figure they know how to forge steel at Imbel by now.

So is this a project I can go forward with? Or should I wait and get a carbon steel frame?


Galling is a problem that can occur when two similar stainless alloys wear on each other. This problem was largely solved years ago by using two slightly different SS alloys, or hardening the two part differently.
Link Posted: 1/25/2006 1:29:04 AM EDT
Blued guns do require a little more care, but unless you soak the gun regularly it shouldn't be a huge issue. I use Birchwood Casey "Sheath" with excellent results. My daily CCW carry gun is a blued Les Baer Stinger and it is rust-free. It gets treated with Sheath once a month, or whenever I clean it after shooting. Just be sure to treat under the grip panels and in any checkering. That is a popular place for rust bunnies to take hold.
Link Posted: 1/25/2006 3:30:54 PM EDT
I prefer stainless for their ability to tolerate neglect better. Nothing at all wrong with carbon steel at all, it is just SS doesn't rust when rained on or covered in sweat and they will withstand saltwater a hell of a lot better.
Link Posted: 1/25/2006 6:10:10 PM EDT
I'm not partial to stainless guns either, but one advantage they do have is that they can be worked on without having to refinish. Beavertails can be added, sight dovetails cut, dehorning done, etc.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 10:50:19 AM EDT
Stainless is everybit as hard as carbon if not harder. Modern SS are passing carbon up in just about everything. Look at some knife making sites and see what they think. Heat treat is a big part of it too.
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