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Posted: 9/18/2002 3:30:30 AM EDT
Anybody have one of the XD pistols? How do you like it? I've heard a lot of good things about them.
Link Posted: 9/18/2002 5:09:55 AM EDT
I had an XD40 for a little while. Really like it. Waiting for an XD45 to come out and I'll be all over it.
Link Posted: 9/18/2002 5:54:40 AM EDT
I picked up an XD9 a couple weeks ago. Pleasant to shoot, accurate, and it's easy to modify S&W Model 5906 aftermarket pre-ban high caps to work in the gun. I picked up three of them from CDNN for $50. Can't beat that price for a high capacity 9mm mag.
Link Posted: 9/18/2002 6:23:40 AM EDT
The XD is a great combat pistol! Check this out: www.hs2000talk.com/cgi-bin/ubb/ultimatebb.cgi
Link Posted: 9/18/2002 9:01:24 AM EDT
I have a XD-9 and love it.. you can also get XD-40 mags and put 14 rounds of 9mm in them legally
Link Posted: 9/18/2002 9:03:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Gary-G23:
Anybody have one of the XD pistols? How do you like it? I've heard a lot of good things about them.



The HS200.....I mean to XD is great,LEO high caps only unless you rig a Bretta 92 mag to work.
Link Posted: 9/18/2002 1:12:12 PM EDT
I've had one of the Gen 1 HS2000s since they first came out and it's been just about perfect. This is a world class pistol and still underpriced. Get one now because it will soon be selling in the $500-800.00 range. It's that good.
Link Posted: 9/19/2002 12:52:29 AM EDT
I have a Gen 3 HS2000, same pistol as the XD9. IMHO, it's the best thing to hit the market since sliced bread, or Glock, whichever came first. Does it outGlock the Glocks? I dunno, but it's pretty damn close. Time will tell, but I think they're an excellent value.
Link Posted: 9/19/2002 7:32:47 PM EDT
paid $219 for one of the first HS2000's to come into the country. Incredible firearm that is every bit as good as a Glock. Not sure I would pay out $500+ for one, but $219... Oh yeahm that's Makarov cheap and Sig/Glock/Walther quality.
Link Posted: 10/3/2002 3:15:37 PM EDT
I have a XD40 Tac( 5") with a M3 flashlight. Nice shooter. I got my for $440 before taxes at a local dealer. There are more and more holsters being offered for the XD. I have a G-code Kydex rig. Get one. It's like a Glock with a better trigger. Plus additional safety features. Also better wight balance. I own 3 Glock.

Glock 17,23 and 30.
Link Posted: 10/8/2002 11:42:04 AM EDT
I bought an XD-9 and I love it. I DO like it better then the Glocks I've owned. I have 4-10rd .40 mags that hold 15 9mm and run like a champ. You need to slightly tap the feed lips in so the last round sits a little lower in the mag or it hold the slide open with one round still in the mag. MHO
Link Posted: 10/8/2002 3:22:49 PM EDT
Thanks for all the replies. I bought a XD-40 4" with Heinie night sights yesterday. I've only had time to put 50 rounds through it but so far I am very impressed. The feel and the trigger pull are outstanding.
Link Posted: 11/3/2002 4:39:48 PM EDT
hello!
do i need to replace the barrel of my XD cal. .40? like they used to in Glocks? to prevent KBs?

tnx
Link Posted: 11/4/2002 4:01:22 AM EDT
The KaBoom issue and GLOCKs IMHO is overstated and often missdiagnosed. The problem is that 40S&W simply has such a small margin for eror that things which are a small problem with other calibers becomes catastrophic when it's a 40S&W.

GLOCKs use a different style rifling than just about everyone else. In addition, there is the myth of GLOCK reliability that leads owners to believe that maintenance is simply not necessary. This often means that they do only minimal cleaning. The rifling in the GLOCK is slightly more suseptable to fouling than conventional rifling. When that is combined with the high pressures developed in the 40S&W, there just is no longer ANY margin for error. Any problems related to case, setback, over or under crimped bullets results in a Kaboom.

All 40S&W handguns face these problems. GLOCK, XD, H&K, Sig, whatever, if you do proper maintenance, if you pay close attention to your ammo and if everything works correctly, it will be fine.
Link Posted: 11/8/2002 7:41:33 PM EDT
Got an XD-9 about two months ago. It is a VERY good pistol, period. It does hold its weight with HK, Glock, & SIG. People will argue, but in my experience with it, it rocks with the best of them! Side by side shot comparisons are always a gas with this pistol. It really can shoot as good as the others. I shoot mine every weekend and its quite accurate. Its also affordable,( still wish I bought a HS2000 for the pittance they were going for) but I'm still quite satisfied. Another plus side is the lifetime warranty. I suggest buying them to all the Glock owners I know! I'm one of the many happy customers.
Link Posted: 11/9/2002 6:33:43 AM EDT
Sig 230.

Im thinking about getting into reloading and have heard lots of bad things about reloading for the .40. After researching it seems that if you are going to have any problems its going to be with the 180gr. bullits. The way I read it is that after bringing your overall round length into specs the 180gr. bullet is seated way deap into the case which causes the pressures to go way up. Am I correct in my thinking and would reloading with 155gr. bullets make for a safer experience?

BKVic
Link Posted: 11/9/2002 9:02:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/9/2002 9:04:43 AM EDT by sig_230]

Originally Posted By BKVic:
Sig 230.

Im thinking about getting into reloading and have heard lots of bad things about reloading for the .40. After researching it seems that if you are going to have any problems its going to be with the 180gr. bullits. The way I read it is that after bringing your overall round length into specs the 180gr. bullet is seated way deap into the case which causes the pressures to go way up. Am I correct in my thinking and would reloading with 155gr. bullets make for a safer experience?

BKVic



Before I go any further there will be many, many people who dissagree with me. I respect their opinions and hope that should they respond, it will be with constructive criticism and advice.

[Nomex Mode On]

I believe that 40S&W is snake oil,and a dangerous choice for all but the most experienced shooters and reloaders. Personally, I am afraid of the 40S&W. I got rid of mine (and the 357SiG barrels that went with them).

Here are my concerns.

The 40S&W is a very high pressure load to start with. The 40S&W cases are also relatively thin in relation to the pressures developed. The case is very straight and if the crimp is too tight the result will be over pressure. Even with factory loads, the crimp is such that if a round is chambered more than once, dropped or hung during feed, bullet setback can be affected.

Here are three factory loads. The picture came from a friend of mine. He had been practicing clearing drills using New Factory 40S&W ammunition. Later, as he was reloading his mags he noticed the setback. As he says, "If I had been handling just one round at a time, or watching tv while reloading the mags, these would have ended up getting fired."



Notice two things in the picture. First, the setback. But then look at the creasing on the casings. If you look at the center and right cases you can see a noticeable crease or bulge about half way down the case.

IMHO, the margins of error are just too small for the 40S&W. It doesn't take much to make a crisis. Barrel fouling, something stuck in a land, crimp too tight or too loose, over or under charge, case flex, metal fatigue, whatever. The difference is that what would be a problem with 9mm or 45acp becomes a catastrophy when you're talking about 40S&W.
Link Posted: 11/9/2002 1:46:16 PM EDT
I like the .40. I think it is a very good defensive round. My first handgun was a .40. I have shot THOUSANDS of .40's ever since 1993 and have never had a single problem. Our 3000 employee Sheriffs office here has been using .40 Glock 22's, 23's, and 27's since 1994. I used to help out on the range, and all officers qualify twice a year with plenty of free pratice. They have never had a KB. With all that said, I think the .40 does leave very little room for error. Rounds like the one Sig_230 posted should not be used at all. If you reload .40's, I would just be extra diligent with all your measurements, etc.
Link Posted: 11/10/2002 12:10:03 PM EDT
I have fired tens of thousands of rounds of .40 ammo, mainly through Glocks, and have never had a kBoom. Maybe I'm just living right.
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 3:25:05 AM EDT
I've been shooting .40 S&W since 1993. S&W 4006, 3 glocks (22, 23, 27), 1 HKs (USP40C), and I have never had a kaboom or a problem with bullet set back, even with rounds that have been rechambered 50 or more times.

.40 S&W is an excellent round. Literally millions of rounds have been fired since the early 90's with few problems. Look at all the Glock 22s in use by law enforcement.

Perhaps there is a problem if you shoot lead in your Glock or don't clean it enough. Or maybe you reload and got your powder measurements off. This is possible. But all these are exceptions to the rule.
Link Posted: 11/18/2002 6:14:07 AM EDT
Link Posted: 11/19/2002 8:22:48 PM EDT
Well that does it!! I was looking at an XD9 at the gun shop tonight. I liked the way it felt and I like the trigger better than my HK. Now after reading this I have to go buy one. Ggrrr you guys are hell on my wallet!!
Link Posted: 11/20/2002 5:34:45 AM EDT
Sig 230;

I don't know that I will ever get rid of my .40's or my G31 with extra barrel, but I do agree that the .40 is not a round to be taken lightly. When the FBI was in the throes of all their S&W 10mm controversy, one of the reasons their firearms people wanted to stay with the 10mm "light" (180gr/980fps) rather than go to the .40 was the fact that the case/bullet combination of the 10mm allowed the same performance at lower chamber pressures. In addition, the "time/pressure spike" for the .40 goes almost straight up...that is, it develops peak pressure almost instantaneously...this is not typical of most handgun calibers.

This fact, when combined with poor maintenance, less than perfect reloads, and partially unsupported chambers, can be a problem waiting to happen. It is also why those manufacturers that initially tried simply opening up their 9mm platform to accomodate the .40, had failures. (Now you know why HK decided to build the USP in .40 first, then downsize it to the 9mm and why Sig went to the thicker, machined slide for the 229)

My personal choice is to use the .40 since I believe it offers some advantages over other rounds in certain applications, but I do so cautiously and only with factory ammunition. For general recreational use, there are better rounds.

Flame all you want, guys, but Sig 230 has a valid point.
Link Posted: 11/20/2002 8:34:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/20/2002 8:36:42 AM EDT by sig_230]

Originally Posted By ikor:
Sig 230;

I don't know that I will ever get rid of my .40's or my G31 with extra barrel, but I do agree that the .40 is not a round to be taken lightly. When the FBI was in the throes of all their S&W 10mm controversy, one of the reasons their firearms people wanted to stay with the 10mm "light" (180gr/980fps) rather than go to the .40 was the fact that the case/bullet combination of the 10mm allowed the same performance at lower chamber pressures. In addition, the "time/pressure spike" for the .40 goes almost straight up...that is, it develops peak pressure almost instantaneously...this is not typical of most handgun calibers.

This fact, when combined with poor maintenance, less than perfect reloads, and partially unsupported chambers, can be a problem waiting to happen. It is also why those manufacturers that initially tried simply opening up their 9mm platform to accommodate the .40, had failures. (Now you know why HK decided to build the USP in .40 first, then downsize it to the 9mm and why Sig went to the thicker, machined slide for the 229)

My personal choice is to use the .40 since I believe it offers some advantages over other rounds in certain applications, but I do so cautiously and only with factory ammunition. For general recreational use, there are better rounds.

Flame all you want, guys, but Sig 230 has a valid point.



Thank you sir. If folk will take time to read what I posted, they will find that my concern is just as you state. Today there are a bunch of FIRST TIME handgunners and FIRST TIME reloaders. This group, through no fault of their own, is running the greatest risks.

The 40S&W IS different. Not better, not worse, Different. There are things with the 40S&W that can get people hurt, but that in any other caliber, would only be annoying or at worst, damaging to their gun.

My point is that those of us who might have more experience have a responsibility to help inform new users of the good, and bad points to each choice they may make.

If you graph the pressure curves vs setback for 40S&W you get a classic J curve. The pressure starts to rise and then goes almost straight up. Look at this setback table for the 180gn 40S&W from Standard OAL for the .40S&W is 1.120" ... table data from "Handloading" by Charles E. Petty, American Handgunner Jan/Feb 1998, p41.

OL Pressure

1.140" 26,195 psi
1.130" 27,521 psi
1.120" 29,079 psi
1.115" 29,924 psi
1.100" 32,900 psi
1.075" 39,641 psi
1.050" 50,954 psi
1.040" 57,926 psi
1.030" 66,890 psi
1.020" 80,345 psi
1.010" 101,286 psi
1.000" 138,744 psi


An additional .025" (25/1000th of an inch) from a setback of 1.100" adds almost 10,00 psi of pressure. Go another .020 and pressure jumps over 18000 psi. That is already at about a 50% over pressure point. Beyond that the scale goes almost straight up.

Since I started posting about this I've had lots of people flame away. But that has nothing to do with the facts, they still stand. When everything goes right, the 40S&W can be a great round. But when anything goes wrong, excessive set back, too tight or too loose crimps, fouling in the rifling, over charge, whatever, the margin of error in the 40S&W is simply too small.

That's JMHO and YMMV, but I feel we do owe it to new members of the shooting fraternity to help them make informed decisions and to give them as much information as possible to stay safe.
Link Posted: 11/24/2002 10:45:42 AM EDT
Just to hijack this thread back from the .40 debate, I did it. I went and picked up an XD9 the other day. I'll second everything you guys said about it. What a great deal!! It shoots as well as my USP and has a better trigger!! I'm glad I bought it!!
Link Posted: 11/24/2002 2:45:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/24/2002 2:53:38 PM EDT
waiting for the XD45. Anyone know if it's still scheduled for January?
Link Posted: 11/24/2002 2:58:12 PM EDT
I think the Springfield XD is a great pistol. I have a 4" and I love it. Got to shoot a Compact XD about two weeks ago. It's a really neat gun. Shorter grip and a 3" barrel. I think Springfield is going to release it at the Shot Show.
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