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3/20/2017 5:03:23 PM
Posted: 6/12/2002 7:09:43 AM EDT
I saw these on "American Shooter". Are they made for all revolvers, or they made for only the s&w the guy was using?
Link Posted: 6/12/2002 11:05:15 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/12/2002 12:12:57 PM EDT
Ok,
I thought they were used as speed loaders.

Thanks
Link Posted: 6/12/2002 12:28:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/12/2002 2:16:09 PM EDT
The gun isteslf has to be modified, or desiged form the first place, to use them. As stated, they're normally used for rimless cartridges in revovlers, but there are several typse that use them for rimmed rounds.

In the case of using them for rimmed rounds, they are being used as a form of speed-loader. They are quite fast. The whole 6 (or7) rounds goes in at once, without having to deal with manipulating and removing the speed-loader. On extraction, all the rounds come out at once as they are still connected. Extraction itself is VERY positive, as the extractor works against the clip. With loose rounds you can sometimes get the extractor star to ride over and empty on extraction, which can't happen with a moon clip.

If you think of, say the 7 shot M27 with moon clips, you basically have the same firepower as a Government Model. 7rnds in a clip. Only they're .357 Mag which is alot of cartridge.

So, the short answer is they make them for certain guns, and in soem they are used as speed loaders.

Ross
Link Posted: 6/13/2002 6:06:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Aimless:
Moon clips are usually used to allow a revolver to fire a round designed for use in a pistol. For example, 10mm, .45 acp. There is no rim on the bottom of the round so it would not normally stay in place when inserted into a revolver cylinder.

Usually (I always thought) an auto round used in a revolver, made for that round, the headspace is on the mouth of ctg. in the cylinder, like an auto. You should be able to fire rounds without the moon clips but can not extract spent shells with the ejector rod. A strong fingernail or a dowel would be needed for that task. Unless you have a stash of 9MM rimmed or .45 autorim ammo, moon clips are mighty handy. I think Ruger also made moon clips for their speed six in 9MM, years ago too.
Link Posted: 6/13/2002 8:36:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/13/2002 8:37:50 AM EDT by Hannah_Reitsch]
Exactly right, the full moons are for an auto round into a revolver.
I had a Smith 610 that was designed for these, to allow it to use the rimless 10mm or .40 S&W rounds.
It wasn't really quicker than a speed loader, because the rounds could wobble at the bullet end, making it a bit harder to load quickly, whereas the speed loader held the rounds more securely. But, the extra step of releasing the rounds from the speedloader, was of course, eliminated.
I also dreaded loading and unloading the moons, as I always seemed to get cut up by the sharp edges.
A wooden dowel rod to help *roll* load them into the moons worked somewhat, and also seemed to assist in getting the spent cases out of the clips, but, in general, the whole process was a hassle.
There are also "half moon" clips that hold 3 rounds each. Also a pain in the Arsch.
Because of other problems with the 610, I finally sold it in disgust a few years ago.
Link Posted: 6/13/2002 12:19:10 PM EDT
I use Moonclips in nearly all my revolvers, no matter if they are .45ACP, .44magnum, .357 Magnum, or .38 Special. Most 627 S&W .357 Magnums are already milled for moonclips, and can shoot either with, or without the clips.

The semi-auto calibers, 10mm, 9mm, .45ACP, etc., need the moonclips for extraction, as stated by others.

You can have 6 shot .38's and 7 shot .38's (or .357's) milled for moonclips, also. I have a 686+ that is being milled as I write this. I like them for speed, but they do eliminate the tactical reload, unless you use 1/3 or 2/3 moonclips. But for pure speed reloading, moonclips are hard to beat!
Link Posted: 6/13/2002 2:28:35 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/14/2002 5:21:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By anothergene:

Originally Posted By Aimless:
Moon clips are usually used to allow a revolver to fire a round designed for use in a pistol. For example, 10mm, .45 acp. There is no rim on the bottom of the round so it would not normally stay in place when inserted into a revolver cylinder.

Usually (I always thought) an auto round used in a revolver, made for that round, the headspace is on the mouth of ctg. in the cylinder, like an auto. You should be able to fire rounds without the moon clips but can not extract spent shells with the ejector rod. A strong fingernail or a dowel would be needed for that task. Unless you have a stash of 9MM rimmed or .45 autorim ammo, moon clips are mighty handy. I think Ruger also made moon clips for their speed six in 9MM, years ago too.



Yes, Ruger used moon clips in their 9mm revolvers. There were some M1917's that supposedly require moon clips even to fire, because they weren't cut properly to headspace on the rim, like and auto. Something about speed of manufacture early in the war. Also some conversions (like a .45ACP converted Webley I had) required moon clips just to keep the rounds in the right place.

I own a S&W M547 which is a "K" frame revolver in 9mm para. It does not require any clips at all because of a specially designed extractor that works on rimmless cases. It headspaces on the mouth of the case like an auto. It also uses conventional speedloaders and is just like any other revolver, except the rimless 9mm Parabellum round is used. They're kinda hard to find(and ain't cheap when you do) but I recommend this gun to anyone. The 9mm in a revolver is a great performer, being between a .38 and a .357 in the same type gun. The short case allows FAST extraction, and it's accurate as all heck. Recoil is also less than a .357 mag. All in all it's a great gun, especially if you shoot 9mm alot like I do.

Ross
Link Posted: 6/14/2002 4:18:34 PM EDT
One of the really nice things about moon-clips is that they are probably the fastest way to load and re-load a revolver. Using moon-clips I can re-load my revolver faster than most folks can change a mag in a pistol.
Link Posted: 6/14/2002 9:47:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Ross:
I own a S&W M547 which is a "K" frame revolver in 9mm para. It does not require any clips at all because of a specially designed extractor that works on rimmless cases. It headspaces on the mouth of the case like an auto. It also uses conventional speedloaders and is just like any other revolver, except the rimless 9mm Parabellum round is used. They're kinda hard to find(and ain't cheap when you do) but I recommend this gun to anyone. The 9mm in a revolver is a great performer, being between a .38 and a .357 in the same type gun. The short case allows FAST extraction, and it's accurate as all heck. Recoil is also less than a .357 mag. All in all it's a great gun, especially if you shoot 9mm alot like I do.
Ross


That M547 sounds COOL! I will have to keep an eye out for one of those. There is a speed loader for that?
Link Posted: 6/15/2002 3:37:15 AM EDT

That M547 sounds COOL! I will have to keep an eye out for one of those. There is a speed loader for that?


Yeah, HKS makes them. They always seem to be in stock with anyone who carries them, because nobody buys them. The M547 came in 3" round butt and 4" square butt. The 3" (the model I have) has a unique hammer. It's factory semi-bobbed. Still more than enough to cock single-action, just less to get snagged. It also has unique factory grips. They were longer than normal "K" round butt and were deep checkered. S&W never used either feature on any other model.

The extractor works by using "fingers" that pop out into the extraction groove on the case when the rod is depressed. They remain out of the way until used. They are pretty robust. While it's more complicated an arangement than a simple star, it doesn't look fragile by any streatch and I don't see it as a point that would fail.

They were made for some European police contract, and the overruns were sold in the US. You don't see them often, but often enough that you can find one sooner or later. I'm still looking for a 4" to go along with the 3" I already have.

Ross
Link Posted: 6/16/2002 2:58:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ross:

I'm still looking for a 4" to go along with the 3" I already have.

Ross



Not if I see it first.
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