Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 2/19/2006 5:32:08 AM EDT
So what are the rules? If i can use a lathe, and make my own piston what proof is needed that i made it or does it need to be purchased? The reciever counts, and that is made from a flat so why couldnt i make my own piston, it looks easy enough to make.
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 5:44:54 AM EDT
If you make your own piston it will certainly count as a US part. If I were making them I would possibly mark it as US made or otherwise make it a little different than the original. There is nothing that says your compliance parts have to be marked as US made, (that I have ever seen anyway).
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 1:02:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/19/2006 1:07:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By schmalts:
So what are the rules? If i can use a lathe, and make my own piston what proof is needed that i made it or does it need to be purchased? The reciever counts, and that is made from a flat so why couldnt i make my own piston, it looks easy enough to make.



There are no rules
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 6:59:10 AM EDT
if you possess the knowlege and compotence to make a safe functional part, then as long as you make it in the USA its U.S. made.

I am a studieing manufacturing engineer and I plan on making at least a couple of my own parts when I get around to assembling my own AK.
Link Posted: 2/20/2006 7:27:44 AM EDT
if you turn a piston
anyone who looks at it will know its us made
thats not how they are made elsewhere

and you dont need to mark it
you can if you want but almost any custom /us made parts that arnt made in bulk arnt marked

Link Posted: 2/20/2006 7:40:11 AM EDT
Its cheaper and less time consuming to simply buy the compliance parts than to machine them yourself.

The only reason to do it yourself is for the sake of doing it yourself.

The gas piston is probably the simplest item to make, needing only a lathe. You can cut the threads single point on the lathe if your lathe can do metric threads. Otherwise, a metric die is probably going to cost more than the ready made piston.

John
Top Top