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Posted: 1/21/2006 9:39:02 AM EDT
I'm still relatively new to AR's, and I'm not exactly sure how much to oil them. I know this is a topic which personal preference has a little to do with, but please let me know what you oil. After a regular cleaning, how much oil should i use, and where are the different places to oil? Pics that show how much oil, and where you put it would be appreciated. I watched an armorer video course, but it really didn't show me this in depth. Thanks guys. Scott
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 9:46:20 AM EDT
The Armors course I took the instructor told us you can't over oil a AR-15 , but that might be a different story in the desert
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 10:26:25 AM EDT
I always lightly clp my bolt/carrier by hand before I shoot any of my AR's.
Just my habit pattern.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 10:55:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/21/2006 10:59:08 AM EDT by eodinert]
It may do no harm to the weapon to slather it in lube, but it does nothing to make the weapon work better.

On the bolt carrier there are 4 polished rails that the bolt carrier rides on, two near the bottom of the carrier, and two up by the gas key. I take the carrier out, and lightly lube those rails. If I'm feeling really froggy, I'll lube the face of the hammer, as it drags on the carrier while the bolt is moving rearward.

If I don't have time to break the weapon open, I open the dust cover, and put exactly 4 drops of CLP inside the receiver; One drop at the top of the visible portion of the bolt carrier, towards the rear of the ejection port... One drop at the bottom of the visible portion of the bolt carrier, towards the rear of the ejection port...... then I lock the bolt to the rear....

Inside the upper receiver, where the steel bolt carrier actually touches the aluminum upper receiver, there will be two slight wear marks in the finish...(one up near the charging handle, one down low near the bottom edge of the upper) this is on the far side of the upper receiver though the ejection port. One drop on the bottom track, one on the upper. That's it. Any more is wasted.

Cycle the bolt a few times by pulling the charging handle and riding it forward. Insert magazine, charge weapon, go.


These two proceedures do the same thing: lubricate the points of contact between the steel bolt carrier and the aluminum upper receiver. By removing the bolt carrier, you can use less lube, and put it more precisely where you want it. If you find yourself someplace shitty, like Iraq, you will find less of the neighborhood lingering in the goo inside your rifle.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 11:04:22 AM EDT
Environment and climate dictates.At the range light coat on all surfaces and a little heavier on the finish wear surfaces wich includes Bolt lugs and extension lugs.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 11:15:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/21/2006 11:19:19 AM EDT by DaFuzz]
Thanks to all for the help so far, especially Eodinert. That helps, those are the exact places I can see shiny metal in my new M4, so those are the places I concentrated on for now. If anybody could take pics of their guns, both outside of the upper and lower closeups, and maybe even in the upper and the charging handle and bolt/carrier after their done oiling to show how much oil should be used, that would also be helpful. Thanks again.

By the way, I'm in Northern Wisconsin, so it's cold shooting right now, and I don't shoot much in sandy or dusty conditions, and I usually clean after I get home from the range, and re-oil. I shoot about 200-400 rounds per trip, on average. By the end of the range day, the action feels kind of gritty, and the charging handle just feels rough. I've only shot two different times, though, which might mean it's just because it's a brand new gun. Both times have been 250-400 rounds, then cleaned and re-oiled. After oiling, the action feels smooth again. The gun hasn't been super dirty or anything either time, but I am shooting mostly wolf, so it's a little dirtier than I'm used to with my handguns.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 11:17:03 AM EDT
The only places I use a visible coat of CLP are the cam pin, bolt (keep it off bolt face and face of lugs), and the four rails on the bolt carrier group.

Anywhere else that I oil, I will wipe off all excess oil until the only sign that it is there is that the finish is slightly darker.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 11:43:27 AM EDT
Keep it lubed and dont let it go dry and it will work even filthy.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 12:38:47 PM EDT
BTT, any pics? any other input or advice?
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 1:00:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Bartholomew_Roberts:
The only places I use a visible coat of CLP are the cam pin, bolt (keep it off bolt face and face of lugs), and the four rails on the bolt carrier group.

Anywhere else that I oil, I will wipe off all excess oil until the only sign that it is there is that the finish is slightly darker.


+1
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 1:44:16 PM EDT
I actually had problems with a type of dry lube, teflon type with my M4. I then ran the rifle completely dry, no lube and didn't have single malfunction. I think to much lube can be bad since it traps carbon but a little does go a long way.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 2:06:25 PM EDT
Dios Mio, I dont think people use enough.

Every year when going to the line (annual qual) , it was sop to show the range safety your locked back weapon on the way to your fighting position. Then, you would be givin a couple of squirts of clp straight through the ejection port. Im quite sure this practice eliminated a lot of alibi shots.

Guys, we kept an 16oz squirt bottle of clp in our QRF vehicle. A couple of squirts straight into the works always resurected a complaining weapon.

Yeah, Yeah, i know-to much clp in the desert is a no no. Well, the trick was to keep it lightly lubed, but if things didnt end real quickly, you better give it a squirt when you get a chance, cause i promise it wont run long without it.
Link Posted: 1/21/2006 6:08:35 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/21/2006 6:10:51 PM EDT by QUIB]

BTT, any pics? any other input or advice?




Link Posted: 1/22/2006 7:53:04 AM EDT
Hey, Quib, thanks a ton, that's exactly what like what I was hoping for. It helped a lot. Thanks to all for your help. Scott
Link Posted: 1/22/2006 5:02:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DaFuzz:
Hey, Quib, thanks a ton, that's exactly what like what I was hoping for. It helped a lot. Thanks to all for your help. Scott



No problem, glad to help!
Link Posted: 1/24/2006 7:28:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By QUIB:

BTT, any pics? any other input or advice?



www.hunt101.com/img/354786.JPG
www.hunt101.com/img/354788.JPG

Why do the takedown and pivot pins need generous lube? I've never heard that before and can't see why it would be needed.
Link Posted: 1/25/2006 3:00:14 AM EDT
Steel on al would be my guess.
Link Posted: 1/25/2006 6:40:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Schwoogie:
Why do the takedown and pivot pins need generous lube? I've never heard that before and can't see why it would be needed.



Where in that document do you see it saying that the takedown pins need generous lube?
Link Posted: 1/25/2006 7:41:23 AM EDT
2/3 WAY DOWN LEFT SIDE IN LINE WITH BOLT PIC.
Link Posted: 1/25/2006 5:49:19 PM EDT
I am not the most experienced AR owner, but I clean, then i put some CLP on my fingers and leave each surface on the bolt, firing pin, charging handle, carrier etc. with a light film on it. Not enough to run off, but it's not dry either. Any extra is blown out by firing. So far it's working well, but I haven't dropped it in any sand and I treat it like a safe queen.
Link Posted: 1/26/2006 10:18:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Schwoogie:

Originally Posted By QUIB:

BTT, any pics? any other input or advice?



www.hunt101.com/img/354786.JPG
www.hunt101.com/img/354788.JPG

Why do the takedown and pivot pins need generous lube? I've never heard that before and can't see why it would be needed.



They are pretty tight and a little oil/lube on the pin will reduce the wear on it when being pushed in and out. Lots of friction on those pins=lots 'o oil!
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 4:40:29 AM EDT
I use Militec-1 and I actually put a light coat on my parts especially the bolt and bolt carrier. With the way militec dries off, it's not harmful especially in the desert. I'm actually in the desert right now. You don't want to put it on so much that you can see the lube shining...

My point. Use Militec-1
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 6:28:40 AM EDT
Militec-1 only a lube, I'll stick with CLP or a LP.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 11:32:31 AM EDT
The cartoon is awesome. I have never seen that before--thanks!
Jasonh.gif
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 11:41:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jbirds1210:
The cartoon is awesome. I have never seen that before--thanks!
Jason



Your welcome!

If you’ve ever served in the Army you’ve seen those cartoons. Every month the Army publishes an equipment maintenance guide called “PS” Magazine. It covers tips on equipment upkeep on just about every type of equipment the Army has including wheeled and tracked vehicles, aircraft, como gear, weapons ect, ect.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 12:01:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pun:
Keep it lubed and dont let it go dry and it will work even filthy.



100% correct.
Link Posted: 2/3/2006 5:16:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By eodinert:

.....On the bolt carrier there are 4 polished rails that the bolt carrier rides on, two near the bottom of the carrier, and two up by the gas key. I take the carrier out, and lightly lube those rails.....




That is exactly how I lube my weapons. A thin bead of lube on the four 'rails' on the bolt carrier, a drop of lube in the cam pin hole and away we go.

When I was young (and over-cleaning my weapons the way Uncle Sugar told me to) I would slather CLP all over the bolt and bolt carrier. All I got in return for that was a bolt group covered in carbon sludge.

Live and learn...
Link Posted: 2/5/2006 8:19:02 AM EDT
Hey, DaFuzz-where in northern Wisc are you? I have a lake home out of Hayward-live in the TC...
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