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Posted: 4/30/2003 7:57:05 AM EDT
How much lube/CLP should the rifle be swimming in? Should you lube it, then wipe off all the excess like an AK? Or should you lube your bolt carrier and let it swim in CLP? I'd think swimming in lube wouldnt be too good because it gives the carbon something to stick to, but I know these can be finicky.

How much?
Link Posted: 4/30/2003 8:17:36 AM EDT
Wow. You will get varying answers here. I used to think a little CLP on the bolt, some lube (NOT CLP) on the rails, and she was good to go. And, I never had any problems with that. I competed in a CMP event last weekend (a clinic for newbies) and they checked our rifles. The experienced shooters pulled my bolt, and smeared LUBE all over the bolt, bolt carrier, inside the charging handle. I have to say, it cycled faster and smoother. On cleanup, their comment was the carbon sticks to the LUBE which is easier to wipe off than the carbon is to clean off the metal. Dunno. I'm gonna try their way for a while and see.
Link Posted: 4/30/2003 8:54:42 AM EDT
That is a very good point! When I clean my bolt I use a toothbrush, maybe with a lot of gunk I would just wipe it off? That would be wonderful. I take it CLP is too thin for this type of application though. What lube did the CMP guys use?
Link Posted: 4/30/2003 9:37:30 AM EDT
Not sure. Looked like plain old fashion grease from a large tin. I just nbought some white lithium grease I plan on using.
Link Posted: 4/30/2003 12:00:42 PM EDT
I was down at walmarts AUtomotive section, and they had a tube of Moly-Lithium extreme pressure grease. Made with molybedenum and lithium, sold by 'Super Tech'. It looks like extremely good stuff, I'm going to degrease my bolt with engine degreaser and apply this stuff. I love buying from the automotive section, basically same products as used in gun care but at 1/10 the price :)
Link Posted: 4/30/2003 12:02:26 PM EDT
I wonder if this is similar to the moly coating people use in bullets/bores? If so that would be an amazing savings, $1 vs the $15 that the gun store sells it for. Only drawback is it's black, so you dont know when it's filthy or not. Oh well it's so cheap I can replace it every time I go shooting. Cant wait!
Link Posted: 4/30/2003 1:36:52 PM EDT
Ok, got a even coat of this extremely thick grease over the entire bolt carrier as well as the internals of bolt carrier. It was degreased first, and the moly grease is sticking firmly. I dunno, it's a THICK grease, I don't have much on it, but where CLP drips and drabs and moves all around, this stuff is like elmers glue but slippery, it's sticking where I put it. I don't know what to expect with this thick of a grease, I'll find out tomorrow when I go shooting though, and will report back here.
Link Posted: 4/30/2003 5:55:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Syk: I was down at walmarts AUtomotive section, and they had a tube of Moly-Lithium extreme pressure grease. Made with molybedenum and lithium, sold by 'Super Tech'. It looks like extremely good stuff, I'm going to degrease my bolt with engine degreaser and apply this stuff. I love buying from the automotive section, basically same products as used in gun care but at 1/10 the price :)
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Again, public education or glue? [url]http://www.glocktalk.com/showthread.php?s=11d566f20807bbd5c6c399c023e6e17e&threadid=152813[/url] Dave S
Link Posted: 4/30/2003 6:54:40 PM EDT
Syk, One of the big differences between oil (CLP) and lube (grease) is that lube stays where you put it. This is a good thing. If you soaked the bolt in CLP the first couple shots would soak you in CLP, and the bolt would be running on the small amount that stayed on it. it would probably be enough, but why take a shower in CLP? The disadvantage to lube over oils is that many lubes do not preserve. Rust can form underneath the lube. So if the rifle is stored for a period of time applying oil is probably a good idea. Don't know for sure what all the right answers are. I am kinda surprised no one else is interested in this subject.
Link Posted: 4/30/2003 7:06:15 PM EDT
"rust can form under lube" not if that lube has a petroleum base and has sealed the metal off from air. and lube an AK? dude thats dumb all that does in get an AK dirty.
Link Posted: 4/30/2003 7:11:53 PM EDT
darth, Might be I heard about the rust thing with the teflon based lubes. Can't remember.
Link Posted: 4/30/2003 8:39:31 PM EDT
Well, engine greases like you guys are mentioning do protect from rust, or at least thats what the can of grease in the garage claims.
Link Posted: 5/1/2003 7:11:24 PM EDT
The worst of the carbon build up is behind the gas rings on the bolt and inside the bolt carrier. In my experience, it doesn't matter what is used for lube in the before mentioned areas. Either oil or grease just gets blown away or cooked into place after the first few shots. The Tetra lubes have little or no rust prevention.
Link Posted: 5/3/2003 7:03:35 PM EDT
Miltec1 makes the lube/grease (synthetic) which is the same as their oil, great stuff and I use the Miltec1 oil on my handguns.
Link Posted: 5/3/2003 7:14:05 PM EDT
Public education or glue? Um, what do you mean by that?
Link Posted: 5/3/2003 8:02:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ARS10: Public education or glue? Um, what do you mean by that?
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It's just proof that assholes are everywhere.
Link Posted: 5/4/2003 11:52:10 AM EDT
When I bought my first AR.. I had just sold my M1A and was very used to using grease. I found that on a cold day grease will stop a AR dead in it's tracks with short stroking. I now use nothing heavier than CLP. The military guys would say never to coat your bolt with oil as it attracts dirt/sand and can lead to jamming. I'm not crawling in the sand so I lightly lube my bolt. As always your milage may vary...
Link Posted: 5/4/2003 7:28:38 PM EDT
Guy's, If I may. Auto/industrial grease is heavy and designed for resistence to increadible pressures. This a good thing for M14 bolt lugs and kingpins in trucks. The bolt and carrier in the AR dosn't need such heavy film thickness.In fact the film thickness can CAUSE problems. Firearm specific greases(Tetra,Mil-Comm etc.) have the consistency of cold cream to reduce drag on the moving parts cold or hot. Auto grease gets thicker and hard with age and temperature. In effect the stuff becomes like old peanut butter when you don't want it too.Expensive synthetic grease aside of course. The USMC and Army have a commonly available guide to the maint. and use of CLP on the M16/AR. The reccomended amounts of lube are clear and have had more than a little thought put into the matter. For Highpower or DCM competitors that will scrub the rifle right after the shoot,and not have to hump 10 hours before the next chance of cleaning,a heavy coat of CLP makes sense. For the grunt in a dusty environment with grit sticking to lube it's another matter entirely. The applications are different to fit the environment the rifle must operate in. It's one of those things. Keep the bolt carrier group lubed with a light coat for storage. Go for the "Wet" look when at the range or look to the firearms specific greases for a balance. Find what works best for you and your rifle in your conditions. There is NO cure for the carbon build up on the gas ring flange of the bolt.It happens. Some lubes I have tried keep it from sticking as bad,but that's it.Still gotta go to war with the elbow grease and brush regardless. It's part of the little black rifles "Charm". One other thing. Lithium is not too healthy for humans. Be carefull with the stuff. Keep safe! S-28
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