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Posted: 12/14/2003 5:18:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/14/2003 7:33:01 AM EDT by joelad]
How difficult is it to finsih an 80% lower receiver? I have zero machining skills, which I know are needed to do the job.

Are there AR builders out there who will finish the 80% receivers?

JoeLad
Link Posted: 12/14/2003 7:09:28 AM EDT
if you have machining skills it is no problem. just a little accurate measuring, drilling reaming, filing, and threading. if you don't have machining skills it would be a waste of your time and money. as for having someone complete it for you, that is not legal. it is legal for you to build your own "legal format" weapon. however, inorder for someone to build a firearm for you they have to be a licensed manufacturer. if a licensed manufaturer builds you a weapon, you then have to go through the normal purchase process.
Link Posted: 12/14/2003 7:21:30 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/14/2003 4:59:31 PM EDT by mjydrafter]
"I'd like to build one on my own, that way it's on nobodby's radar screen." Unfortunatley you just ruined this for yourself, by posting it on a public forum. I would have to say that if I were you I would take some community college machining classes and see if it's right for you. The processes for completing an 80%er aren't super difficult, but you'll at least want some good machining practices. I don't think anyone can build it for you other than Bushmaster, Rock River, et al. If you're looking for the cheapest way to make an AR, this will not be for you. The cheapest way in my opinion would be to buy a lower of your choice, and a kit to your liking and slap it together. If you're contimplating machining a 80% I'm certain you'de have very little difficulty putting a kit and lower together. Remember there are some aspects of building a 80% that don't involve machining. Anodizing comes to mind. Now, I'm not trying to talk you out of it. I'm just trying to show you the whole picture. there are people who have completed them with little more than common hand tools: [url]http://mujahadeenar15a2.tripod.com/[/url] but it will be much more fun & turn out better with proper tools. check out [url]http://quartz2.cyberstation.net/~dwpaul/bs-home.htm[/url] for an excellent overview/guide to completing an 80%er and decide if it's right for you. Good luck. Edited to fix link. Just putting a space in front of the http added the extra http, weird.
Link Posted: 12/14/2003 11:35:38 AM EDT
Are there AR builders out there who will finish the 80% receivers?
View Quote
Yep. They wear blue jackets with pull down panels on the back that say "BATF"...
Link Posted: 12/14/2003 12:05:14 PM EDT
check out http://quartz2.cyberstation.net/~dwpaul/bs-home.htm for an excellent overview/guide to completing an 80%er and decide if it's right for you. Linkee no workee! Yep. They wear blue jackets with pull down panels on the back that say "BATF"... Hey! I wear one of those jackets at work everyday! Er, I mean...
Link Posted: 12/14/2003 2:23:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/14/2003 2:25:26 PM EDT by postino]
Originally Posted By joelad: Linkee no workee!
View Quote
Copy it to the clipboard, delete the second http// and it'll work...
Link Posted: 12/15/2003 11:33:12 AM EDT
...as for having someone complete it for you, that is not legal ... inorder for someone to build a firearm for you they have to be a licensed manufacturer.
View Quote
Not strictly true. You can have assistance in finishing your 80% lower, but you have to be present for all the work being done. You can't drop the 80% lower off at a machine shop and pick it up when completed, that specific scenario would require a licensed manufacturer as the above gentleman points out. However, if you arrange for a friend or even a professional machinist to "help" you with the work, all work is completed in your presence and you take immediate possession of the completed piece then it's completely legal. Even if you compensate your assistant, YOU "made" the receiver. But it's important for the receiver not to leave your possession until it's complete and you take it home. If you're really interested in doing one of these and have minimal skills, I'd refer you to [url]ktordnance.com[/url] because he has really nice CNC machined lowers and he does some things with his design that make it even easier to finish. Costs a little more than the usual castings you see around but his stuff is really beautiful. Also, he does workshops every so often in which he opens up the shop so people can come do their own using his facility. I did that myself and came home with some very cool stuff.
Link Posted: 12/15/2003 12:26:29 PM EDT
[/quote] If you're really interested in doing one of these and have minimal skills, I'd refer you to [url]ktordnance.com[/url] because he has really nice CNC machined lowers and he does some things with his design that make it even easier to finish. Costs a little more than the usual castings you see around but his stuff is really beautiful. Also, he does workshops every so often in which he opens up the shop so people can come do their own using his facility. I did that myself and came home with some very cool stuff.[/quote] Sounds like the way to go for me. And after reading about Kt Ordnance on their website, I'd gladly pay more for an 80% receiver. JoeLad
Link Posted: 12/16/2003 5:45:16 AM EDT
So I finish the KT Ordnance receiver, can I then send it out to have it phosphated? Is that legal? I've seen pictures on the web of 80% receivers built up into rifles, and every one is still shiny aluminum surround by a black rifle.
Link Posted: 12/16/2003 8:59:08 AM EDT
Yes, you can, but since it is now completed, you have to follow the laws for shipping firearms, which includes it being logged in the FFL bound book when he receives it to be phosphated.
Link Posted: 12/16/2003 9:05:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/16/2003 1:39:36 PM EDT by mjydrafter]
If I were you I'de check out one of KT's barbeques, he'll allow you to finish the 80% on the same equipment that did the 1st 80% of the machining. I would suggest you check out the forum over at [url]http://www.roderuscustom.tzo.com[/url] I know of a couple of people that successfully anodized thier recievers at home. If you have any questions on this procedure let me know. Or you can do as others and paint it (with gun paint). But you'll lose the benifit of the anodizing process which adds a layer of very hard protection to your lower.
Link Posted: 12/16/2003 11:08:43 AM EDT
[url=ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=4&t=148435]BIY lower build sites[/url]
Link Posted: 12/16/2003 5:16:16 PM EDT
Once you've finished it then it's treated just like any other firearm/receiver. You don't have to send it off to have it finished. I hear a lot of people talk about anodizing, but I don't believe it's really necessary. You could have all of that done, but you could also finish it yourself. I used John Norrell's Moly Resin ([url]http://www.johnnorrellarms.com/default.asp[/url]) to refinish some of mine and quite a few rounds later, so far, so good. You buy his resins and a cheap air brush at Hobby Lobby and you're good to go. One tip: be sure your lowers are blasted with abrasive to prepare the surface, or the resin could posibly be less durable than you'd like. If you don't have a blasting cabinet you can get this done at machine shops, welders, etc.
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