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Posted: 11/3/2002 9:32:16 AM EDT
Someone was asking me about home anodizing so I am reposting my process:

1) Prepare the surface by sanding, cleaning, and sandblasting
2) Etch with a lye solution for a few seconds.
3) Rinse
4) Desmut/deox for 2 minutes (I use Caswell's solution)
5) Rinse
6) Anodize for >=90 minutes using a 2:1 distilled water to battery acid solution. The + lead of the power suply connects to the part, the - lead goes to a lead plate in the tank. Try to keep the solution as cold as possible by doing it on a cold day or using a double ice bath. Aggitate the part often (turn off the power before touching the tank bar so you don't kill yourself).
7) Neutralize the part in a baking soda solution
8) Rinse with distilled water
9) Dye for an hour (I use Caswells anodizing dye). I found that I get better results at 120 to 130 F instead of the suggested 140 F.
10) Rinse
11) Boil in a nickel acetate solution to seal the anodize for about 30 minutes
12) Rinse and apply wd40


Link Posted: 11/5/2002 8:28:11 AM EDT
Thanks for the info.(1)I have was wondering if there is additional info in a book some where?(2)Voltage used in the process ,DC voltage?,how many amps?
Link Posted: 11/5/2002 9:22:03 AM EDT
Use at least 12 V with a 10 A rating for an AR lower. It will suck current as required. With a cold acid bath the current will drop to a steady state value near 2 A.
Link Posted: 11/6/2002 6:01:42 AM EDT
I have a deep-freeze (chest freezer) that is currently not being used.

I'm wondering for these anodizing processes that require the temperature to be held low if it might be a good idea to chill the solution in the chest freezer, and to do the actual anodizing in the freezer with the "coldness" cranked all the way to max.

I'm not sure it would be any more effective than an ice bath (what's a "double ice bath"?) but it might be less of a PITA.

~Wolfrick
Link Posted: 11/6/2002 10:35:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Wolfrick:
I have a deep-freeze (chest freezer) that is currently not being used.

I'm wondering for these anodizing processes that require the temperature to be held low if it might be a good idea to chill the solution in the chest freezer, and to do the actual anodizing in the freezer with the "coldness" cranked all the way to max.

I'm not sure it would be any more effective than an ice bath (what's a "double ice bath"?) but it might be less of a PITA.

~Wolfrick



Unless I'm mistaken, a "double ice bath" means that the container with the acid solution sits in another larger container of ice water. You can't just add ice directly to the acid bath because the ice would dilute the acid solution as it melts.
Link Posted: 11/6/2002 12:35:37 PM EDT
Correct. I just put the anodizing bucket in one of those large platic storage containers, the fill the container outside the anodizing bucket with a couple bags of ice and several gal of water.
Link Posted: 11/10/2002 5:39:04 PM EDT
A lot of good information here about anodizing. However I saw no mention about rubber apron, rubber gloves or full face shield and acid nuteralizer in case of accident.

A face full of battery acid can leave you blind and or disfigured for life. I'd rather pay to have it done professionally. IMHO

Link Posted: 11/10/2002 5:52:07 PM EDT
Here's a step-by-step process with pictures to go along.

www.focuser.com/atm/anodize/anodize.html
Link Posted: 11/12/2002 4:24:21 AM EDT
Something I just remembered from Chemistry 101...you can add more acid to an acid or water solution, but you should NEVER add water to acid solution. I believe it will cause the acid to heat up instantaneously. I suppose this would go for adding ice as well, but I never put that to practice.
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