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Posted: 9/15/2010 10:26:56 AM EDT
There must be thousands of 'dead' ACOGs by now; has anyone heard of them selling refurbs for half price or less? I think they could sell all they wanted. Maybe the military has a deal with them to refurb and return to service.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 10:54:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 1saxman:
There must be thousands of 'dead' ACOGs by now; has anyone heard of them selling refurbs for half price or less? I think they could sell all they wanted. Maybe the military has a deal with them to refurb and return to service.


The good thing about ACOGs is even when the Tritium "dies", it's still a damn-fine scope. It's so dim on mine (they're only 2-3yrs old) that I probably wouldn't even notice. It has to be REALLY dark to see it, then I can't see anything anyway (might be just my eyes, though). The fiber-optic catches enough light to work fine for me.

Although I've never had/wanted to do it, it's my understanding that Trijicon will go through the scope and replace the Tritium for a very reasonable charge. Those things are truly made for a LIFETIME of service, and even the "dead" and beat-to-crap ones still command a hefty price.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 10:57:50 AM EDT
As far as I know the US military didn't start using ACOGs until the early 2000s. The tritium has a halflife of 12.5 years, so that means for a scope purchased in 2005 it will be half as bright by 2017-2018. The tritium isn't field replacable but Trijicon will service a scope to replace the dead H3. I doubt the military has *any* dead ACOGs yet.

I would be surprised if a refurbished ACOG (military or privately owned) would be worth significantly less than a new one.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 11:41:13 AM EDT
I bought a trijicon ACOG non-fiber-optic way back in the "day", ser# 1510... tritium was pretty well gone after about 15 years or so, sold it rather then re-charge the tritium. Guy I sold it too didn't care about the Tritium... he paid more then what I originally paid for it brand new and loved the price and scope. It worked out cheaper for me to sell the old one and use that to partialy fund a new one, even with the price difference it ended up cheaper then the recharge fee. Plus I got a fiber-optic option on the new one.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 1:16:50 PM EDT
Originally Posted By phurba:
As far as I know the US military didn't start using ACOGs until the early 2000s. The tritium has a halflife of 12.5 years, so that means for a scope purchased in 2005 it will be half as bright by 2017-2018. The tritium isn't field replacable but Trijicon will service a scope to replace the dead H3. I doubt the military has *any* dead ACOGs yet.

I would be surprised if a refurbished ACOG (military or privately owned) would be worth significantly less than a new one.


A poster stated that he had been issued one in the mid-90s which is why the thought of old ones came to mind.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 3:30:13 PM EDT
Just because something has a half life, it doesn't mean it is half as bright at 12 years. It will deteroirate over time, but half life isn't that simple.
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 4:52:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By marko16:
Just because something has a half life, it doesn't mean it is half as bright at 12 years. It will deteroirate over time, but half life isn't that simple.


According to Trijicon's FAQ it is
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 7:18:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By phurba:
Originally Posted By marko16:
Just because something has a half life, it doesn't mean it is half as bright at 12 years. It will deteroirate over time, but half life isn't that simple.


According to Trijicon's FAQ it is


I;m sure Trijicon wouldn't lie. The glow is produced by a radioactive isotope which does have a certain half life and that is a direct correlation to the brightness of the tritium. Thanks...
Link Posted: 9/15/2010 7:34:39 PM EDT
My appologies, I thought the Beta decay was not linear.
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