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Posted: 4/1/2006 3:47:55 AM EDT
I saw this on Ammoman's sight and in the description it says to be used only in "throated match guns"



What will happen if shot with a 20" heavy barrel ? Is it too hot for the gun, will it wear out the inside of the barrel ? Also can someone explain what a throated match gun is. Thanks
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 4:14:13 PM EDT
Well either I asked a real stupid question, or I found something that stumps arfcom
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 6:22:38 PM EDT
The only thing I know is that you have to feed each bullet at a time because they are too long.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 6:34:19 PM EDT
I think you need to use a barrel with a twist rate of 1:8 or 1:7 but I am not sure.

Wait until one of the pros respond.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 6:35:58 PM EDT
I think you need to use a barrel with a twist rate of 1:8 or 1:7 but I am not sure.

Wait until one of the pros respond.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 7:18:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/3/2006 7:23:26 PM EDT by Vapor-Trail]
The throat must be cut to accomodate the profile of the bullet.

If it is not deep enough you wont be able to chamber the cartridge.

Plus these are seated longer than magazine length.

ETA:

Competition shooters who use this ammo often have thier chambers and throats cut specifically for the cartridge they use for the tightest fit.
Link Posted: 4/3/2006 7:31:19 PM EDT
These are super popular in high power for the 600 yard stage.

Many 5.56 and Wylde chambers will fit these fine, as well as some .223 chambers. Some will not. You pretty much have to check you individual gun. These are generally loaded about as hot as the .223 is made to go and bullet setback is a potential risk. Even though these bullets are longer, most of the length is in the ogive.

If you get a box and try them in an AR make sure your bolt is closing easily.

The only advantage these have over the 77 grain projectiles is the longer bullet shape and better long range ballistics as a result. The trade off is that they don't fit in AR magazines, but will fit in most short action bolt gun magazines. The faster twists are pretty much required, although that again comes down to individual gun, as long barrels can sometimes get by on slower twists.

I don't have my reloading log book handly, but my 80 grain handloads made to match one of my rifle's chambers is a very long projectile for the .223. I can't remember off the top of my head, but it made 55grain FMJ's look like short stubby rounds.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 2:23:41 AM EDT
UVvis and Vapor-Trail thanks for the explanations. This is why I love this place. When I need to know I can usually get some solid info.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 7:03:05 AM EDT
I thought the throated match gun thing was a concern that the bullet was so long that the bullet would contact the lands when chambered and if not fired the bullet would stick and be extracted from the case when the case was extracted.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:27:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FZ1Steve:
I thought the throated match gun thing was a concern that the bullet was so long that the bullet would contact the lands when chambered and if not fired the bullet would stick and be extracted from the case when the case was extracted.



I think that's less of a concern than the fact that since the bullet is seated so tight the chamber pressures will jump several thousand PSI and could cause a kaboom. Same problem if you load a 5.56 cartridge in a .223-only chamber.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:59:23 AM EDT
The bullet sticking thing is possible. It is more of a problem in bolt action guns where you have a mechanical advantage and can "soft seat" a bullet. There should be enough neck tension on a new round that it more likely to cause your round not to chamber than wedge the bullet in the throat. If this did happen, you'd have a horrible time pulling the case apart from the bullet in the first place. Then a cleaning rod to bang the bullet free.
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