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Posted: 1/19/2006 8:41:36 PM EDT
I am cheap so therefor I re-use everything. My question is how do you dry out Silica Gel packs in the oven? I have heard of it being done but I was wondering if anyone had time and temp combinations?
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 9:14:50 PM EDT
I use the microwave, at a 2 or 3 setting on the power, cook it until it's not hot and steamy anymore (5-7 minutes or so). With a glass of water or something in the microwave to absorb some of the excess energy. Silica itself doesn't seem to absorb microwave energy, only the water.

I think the oven method is like 300 degrees for 30-45 minutes IIRC.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 8:34:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Gamma762:
I use the microwave, at a 2 or 3 setting on the power, cook it until it's not hot and steamy anymore (5-7 minutes or so). With a glass of water or something in the microwave to absorb some of the excess energy. Silica itself doesn't seem to absorb microwave energy, only the water.

I think the oven method is like 300 degrees for 30-45 minutes IIRC.



Wouldn't the water vapor cooking off further contaminate the Silica?
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 10:52:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BSTOCK:

Originally Posted By Gamma762:
I use the microwave, at a 2 or 3 setting on the power, cook it until it's not hot and steamy anymore (5-7 minutes or so). With a glass of water or something in the microwave to absorb some of the excess energy. Silica itself doesn't seem to absorb microwave energy, only the water.

I think the oven method is like 300 degrees for 30-45 minutes IIRC.



Wouldn't the water vapor cooking off further contaminate the Silica?


You're heating the water that's already in the silica and driving it out.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 3:33:04 PM EDT
Way back in the early 1980s, when I was working on Air Force radios, we received repaired modules from the depot. They were packed with dessicant packs of a certain capacity, and these fabric bag packages had printed instructions for how to "recharge" them. Basically, they called for putting them in an oven and baking them for a while at a low temperature to drive out the absorbed water.

I don't bother with that stuff anymore. I put "crystal" cat litter in fabric bags I make from cheap remnants at fabric stores and sew them up. If they aren't still really "crunchy" sounding when they're handled, indicating they have absorbed some water, I pull the thread closing up the bag, dump the contents in the trash, and refill them. It's inexpensive and it doesn't take much (< 1 cup for a 40mm ammo can) to protect a large volume. Problem solved.
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